The itinerary <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> has been successfully created. Now you can add in works from the Collection browser
<em>TITULOOBRA</em> added to <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> itinerary

Search

Explore the collection

Refine results
61 results
Conjugal row
Grey-brown wash on ivory paper, laid paper. 1812 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Conjugal row
Grey-brown wash on ivory paper, laid paper. 1812 - 1823
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Created in the tumultuous years of the war, Sketchbook F offers a set of drawings marked by cruelty. Among the most heartrending of these is this unequal struggle between a man and a woman, by means of which Goya demonstrates his capacity to depict the essence of gender violence. The somber atmosphere of the bedroom and the lights cast on the bodies dressed in their nightgowns show the movement of

What is the use of a cup?
Black chalk, Red chalk on ivory paper, laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
What is the use of a cup?
Black chalk, Red chalk on ivory paper, laid paper. Ca. 1813
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 59, What is the use of a cup?.In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the brutality of bot

Duels. On guard!
Grey-brown wash on ivory paper, dark yellow laid paper. 1815 - 1820
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Duels. On guard!
Grey-brown wash on ivory paper, dark yellow laid paper. 1815 - 1820
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Because of its technique and theme, this Sketchbook F seems to have been produced around the same time as Album C, roughly between 1812 and 1820. The drawings were executed using a brush an iron gall ink, the same ink as used for standard writing at that time. In this case, Goya reused an old notebook due to the shortage of paper at that time. Despite its thematic variety, the Sketchbook F present

What is the use of a cup?
Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
What is the use of a cup?
Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 59, What is the use of a cup?. Goya devoted many of the prints in the first part of The Disasters of War to scenes in which the civilian population is the innocent victim of soldiers´ excesses, particularly with women presented as the object of the invaders´ sexual violence. Although the Disasters do not follow a strict order, there is a structure that allows us to see how Goya a

The filiation
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The filiation
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 57, The filiation. In the composition, a standing man reads to a seated woman. Both wear masks. Another man scrutinizes them with a monocle while the monkey on his shoulders looks directly out at the viewer, and various other figures appear in the background. The layout of the print does not entirely correspond to that of the preparatory drawing. The reading man has been replaced by a wo

Two of a Kind
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Two of a Kind
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 5, Two of a Kind is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in depictions of that period. At first glance, the preparatory drawing might seem to be a simple genre scene—a lady being courted by a gentleman while two older women converse behind them—but the upper-class appearance of both the woman’s clothing (a mantilla and black shawl, a silk lace garment covering her head and

There is No Time Left
Drypoint, Etching, Wash, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
There is No Time Left
Drypoint, Etching, Wash, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Rather than simply reflecting concrete events, Goya sought to capture their essence. He therefore placed himself alongside the action, taking part in a way that no previous artist ever had. This explains the proximity of the figures presented in each of the Disasters, which are monumental and very close to the viewer, barely leaving room for anecdotal details in the background. It is possible to i

The kidnapping horse
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The kidnapping horse
Drypoint, Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 10, The Kidnapping Horse, closely resembles Folly of Fear (D04274) in its technique, with light reddish washes to define the wooded background and more intense washes for the figures. Its notable similarity to the corresponding engraving (G02178) reveals that Goya conceived this drawing with considerable compositional clarity, unlike others in the series. However, he made significant c

Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 63, Look how solemn they are! is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in representations of that period. The composition has three figures, one of whom is being ridden by the one closest to the viewer, and the same occurs in the corresponding print. These are the lazy drones who live off of others. The handwritten commentary at the Biblioteca Nacional observes: Only monstr

Nothing. The Event will tell
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Nothing. The Event will tell
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

More has been written about Nothing. The Event will tell (number 69 of the Disasters of War), than about any other preparatory drawing for the Disasters. Its cryptic character has sparked a variety of iconographic readings, and even more interpretations that seek to divine Goya’s inner thoughts at a time that was unquestionably adverse for him in the personal sense. Its obscure meaning may well be

They already have a seat
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They already have a seat
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

En esta escena Goya alude a conceptos como “moza de silla”, identificado con la práctica de la prostitución, o a expresiones tales como “sentar la cabeza”, en el sentido de volverse una persona juiciosa, entendiéndose esto como un acto de ironía por parte de Goya. El tipo de sillas y la contraposición entre las mujeres y los petimetres permite suponer una escena paródica del madrileño Paseo o Saló

Harvest of the Dead
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Harvest of the Dead
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 63, Harvest of the Dead.Goya devoted many of the prints in the first part of The Disasters of War to scenes in which the civilian population is the innocent victim of soldiers´ excesses, particularly with women presented as the object of the invaders´ sexual violence. Although the Disasters do not follow a strict order, there is a structure that allows us to see how Goya approach

It’s no use crying out
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
It’s no use crying out
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 58, It’s no use crying out. Goya devoted many of the prints in the first part of The Disasters of War to scenes in which the civilian population is the innocent victim of soldiers´ excesses, particularly with women presented as the object of the invaders´ sexual violence. Although the Disasters do not follow a strict order, there is a structure that allows us to see how Goya appr

He gets something out of it
Drypoint, Etching, Burin on ivory paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
He gets something out of it
Drypoint, Etching, Burin on ivory paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 40, He gets something out of it.In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the brutality of both sides, which inevita

Exhortation
Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Exhortation
Retroussage, Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1815 - 1819
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disparates, 16, Exhortation. The print varies from this preparatory drawing in certain aspects of its composition. It increases the number of figures, which makes it more confusing, and adds a dramatic tone to the woman’s facial expression. The series of figures aligned to form a chain alludes to the difficulty of choosing between virtue and chastity, on one hand; and lechery and vice, on the othe

There was nothing to be done and he died
Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
There was nothing to be done and he died
Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 53, There was nothing to be done and he died.In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the brutality of both sides,

Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 4, Mummy´s Boy (El de la rollona). The word rollona used in the title refers to a strong, plump woman and was only used in the expression “el niño de la rollona”, which appears in various proverbs and sayings in the 17th and 18th centuries and refers to a foolish, spoilt individual who behaves like a baby.

Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 63, Look how solemn they are! is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in representations of that period. The composition has three figures, one of whom is being ridden by the one closest to the viewer, and the same occurs in the corresponding print. These are the lazy drones who live off of others. The handwritten commentary at the Biblioteca Nacional observes: Only monstr

Up