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Witches' Flight
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1798
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Witches' Flight
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1798
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Three bare-chested characters wearing dunce caps hold a fourth, nude character in the air while another lies on the floor, covering his ears, A sixth figure flees, his head covered with a white cloth. With his hand, he makes the gesture intended to protect him from the evil eye. At the right of the scene, a donkey stands out against the neutral background. This was one of six canvases Goya sold to

Will She Live Again?
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Will She Live Again?
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disasters of War, 80, Will She Live Again? This drawing presents the outcome of the previous one (D03983). The volume of prints that the artist gave to Ceán with the title Fatal Consequences of Spain’s Bloody War with Bonaparte. And other Emphatic Caprices began with the premonitory image of a dejected man, defenseless before the terrible circumstances brought on b

Truth has died
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Truth has died
Red chalk on laid paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A preparatory drawing for Disaster 79, Truth has died. This scene, along with Disaster 80, Will she live again?, marks the end of the series of engravings that constitute the first edition of the Disasters of War (1863). Despite the apparent disorder visible in this series, it has an inner logic that presents the subjects more or less in groups, using titles to link the images and creating sequenc

Truth has died
Etching, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Truth has died
Etching, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This scene, along with Disaster 80, Will she live again?, marks the end of the series of engravings that constitute the first edition of the Disasters of War (1863). Despite the apparent disorder visible in this series, it has an inner logic that presents the subjects more or less in groups, using titles to link the images and creating sequences in which the artist uses narrative tools to develop

Disaster 80. Will She Live Again?
Etching, Burnisher on paper. XIX century
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Disaster 80. Will She Live Again?
Etching, Burnisher on paper. XIX century
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

The volume of prints that the artist gave to Ceán with the title Fatal Consequences of Spain’s Bloody War with Bonaparte. And other Emphatic Caprices began with the premonitory image of a dejected man, defenseless before the terrible circumstances brought on by the approaching war. The end of the series shows just how accurate that premonition was, although Goya leaves room for some small b

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