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Study for the dead Christ
Black chalk, Touches of white chalk on ivory laid paper. 1768
Mengs, Anton Raphael
Study for the dead Christ
Black chalk, Touches of white chalk on ivory laid paper. 1768
Mengs, Anton Raphael

Neoclassical painter Anton Raphael Mengs spent some eleven years in Spain -from 1761 to 1769, and again from 1774 to 1777- working primarily on the decoration of Madrid’s Royal Palace for King Charles III. For the king’s bedroom, Mengs made a series of easel paintings on the Passion of Christ -most importantly, Descent from the Cross, Patrimonio Nacional, on permanent loan to the Museu Nacional d’

Italian Notebook
Black chalk, Pencil, Red chalk, Bistre, Grey-brown ink, Iron gall ink on laid paper. 1771 - 1788
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Italian Notebook
Black chalk, Pencil, Red chalk, Bistre, Grey-brown ink, Iron gall ink on laid paper. 1771 - 1788
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Goya bought this sketchbook during his two-year sojourn in Italy, between 1769 and 1771. A taccuino or aide-mémoire, it includes the earliest drawings made at the time, among them copies of paintings and sculptures seen in Rome and sketches for paintings executed either there or immediately following his return to Spain. It also contains handwritten notes recording the names of cities visit

Saint Ildephonsus and Recceswinth in the Tomb of Saint Leocadia / Two Standing Figures of Saints
Pencil, Pencil on ivory laid paper. XVII century
Cajés, Eugenio (Attributed To)
Saint Ildephonsus and Recceswinth in the Tomb of Saint Leocadia / Two Standing Figures of Saints
Pencil, Pencil on ivory laid paper. XVII century
Cajés, Eugenio (Attributed To)

The scene takes place in an architectural setting with an altar on the right and an open sarcophagus on which the saint is half-kneeling. To the left, Saint Ildephonsus, wearing pontifical vestments, holds out his hands to receive the scissors that are held out by Recceswinth, standing behind the tomb. The attribution to Cajés is perfectly plausible in view of the character, the technique a

Charles III, King of Spain
Taille douce: etching and engraving on ivory laid paper. 1788
Ximeno y Planes, Rafael; Selma, Fernando
Charles III, King of Spain
Taille douce: etching and engraving on ivory laid paper. 1788
Ximeno y Planes, Rafael; Selma, Fernando

This portrait is closely based on Charles III in hunting Dress by Francisco de Goya. The monarch, wearing a dress coat, has the same pose as in the painting, leaning forward slightly and with sloping shoulders. The modelling of the face is also the same. The print was published in 1788 in the revised edition of the Bibliotheca hispana vetus (1672) by Nicolás Antonio.

Que sacrificio!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Que sacrificio!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 14, What a Sacrifice! is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in that period as dreams were used to represent the world from the perspective of the artist’s imagination without reference to any concrete reality. The print and the preparatory drawing (D04195) are identical except for some background details. We know the subject thanks to handwritten comments by Valent&iacu

Devout profession
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Devout profession
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Caprichos, 70, Devout profession. The harsh criticism set out by the artist in these images, which he ironically titled Devout profession, to openly reveal the scene’s meaning, is directed against ignorant and hypocritical clergymen, metaphorically represented here by witchcraft.

All will fall
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
All will fall
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 19. The satirical tone that Goya employs in the Caprichos in which he criticises prostitution is applied to both the girls and their clients, the latter depicted as plucked chickens. The artist’s comment on this drawing refers to the young men and women’s inevitable end: “And to think those about to fall won’t take warning from those already fallen. But there is no remedy: all will fall.”

There it goes
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
There it goes
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 66, There it goes is part of The Carpichos. The subject matter was common in representations of that period. The preparatory drawing’s composition shows a witch riding on a mischievous devil, as does the corresponding print (G02154). Valentín Carderera’s handwritten commentary at the the Museo del Prado in Madrid reads: There goes a witch, riding on a mischievous devil. This poor d

The filiation
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The filiation
Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 57, The filiation. In the composition, a standing man reads to a seated woman. Both wear masks. Another man scrutinizes them with a monocle while the monkey on his shoulders looks directly out at the viewer, and various other figures appear in the background. The layout of the print does not entirely correspond to that of the preparatory drawing. The reading man has been replaced by a wo

Two of a Kind
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Two of a Kind
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 5, Two of a Kind is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in depictions of that period. At first glance, the preparatory drawing might seem to be a simple genre scene—a lady being courted by a gentleman while two older women converse behind them—but the upper-class appearance of both the woman’s clothing (a mantilla and black shawl, a silk lace garment covering her head and

Even thus he cannot make her out
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Even thus he cannot make her out
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 7, Even thus he cannot make her out is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter—social criticism—was a useful tool for both the artist and other members of the Enlightenment, and its intentions are clarified by Valentín Carderera’s handwritten notes at both the Museo del Prado and the Biblioteca Nacional. The former reads: How can he make her out? To know what she is, eyeglasses a

Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 63, Look how solemn they are! is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in representations of that period. The composition has three figures, one of whom is being ridden by the one closest to the viewer, and the same occurs in the corresponding print. These are the lazy drones who live off of others. The handwritten commentary at the Biblioteca Nacional observes: Only monstr

They already have a seat
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
They already have a seat
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

En esta escena Goya alude a conceptos como “moza de silla”, identificado con la práctica de la prostitución, o a expresiones tales como “sentar la cabeza”, en el sentido de volverse una persona juiciosa, entendiéndose esto como un acto de ironía por parte de Goya. El tipo de sillas y la contraposición entre las mujeres y los petimetres permite suponer una escena paródica del madrileño Paseo o Saló

Pretty teacher!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Pretty teacher!
Drypoint, Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 68, Pretty teacher!

Where is mommy going?
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Where is mommy going?
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 65, Where is mommy going? (G02102) is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in representations of that period. The composition presents four figures accompanied by nocturnal animals. The owl and two of the figures hold up the large nude woman at the center of the drawing. Another wraps herself around her from behind. This placement corresponds to that of the preparatory dra

Funeral Catafalque of Maria Amalia of Saxony in Barcelona
Etching on ivory laid paper. 1761
Valls, Ignacio; Grau, Carlos
Funeral Catafalque of Maria Amalia of Saxony in Barcelona
Etching on ivory laid paper. 1761
Valls, Ignacio; Grau, Carlos

The Queen Maria Amalia died on 27 September 1760, leaving Charles III a widower. He never remarried. This etching shows the funeral held in Barcelona. The work of the brothers Francisco and Manuel Tramullas, the print represents different allegories crowned by Eternal Bliss.

Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Mummy’s Boy
Burnished aquatint, Etching on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 4, Mummy´s Boy (El de la rollona). The word rollona used in the title refers to a strong, plump woman and was only used in the expression “el niño de la rollona”, which appears in various proverbs and sayings in the 17th and 18th centuries and refers to a foolish, spoilt individual who behaves like a baby.

Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Look how solemn they are!
Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint on ivory laid paper. 1797 - 1799
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Capricho 63, Look how solemn they are! is part of The Caprichos. The subject matter was common in representations of that period. The composition has three figures, one of whom is being ridden by the one closest to the viewer, and the same occurs in the corresponding print. These are the lazy drones who live off of others. The handwritten commentary at the Biblioteca Nacional observes: Only monstr

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