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Portrait of a young Man
Marble. 161 - 170
Roman Sculptor
Portrait of a young Man
Marble. 161 - 170
Roman Sculptor

The sitter is depicted with a dense head of curly hair, a carefully trimmed beard, thin moustache, and a goatee beard between his mouth and chin. The young man’s elegant hairstyle imitates portraits of the Emperors Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus of 161 A. D. The military cloak indicates that the sitter had recently embarked on a military career.

Young Roman, formerly identified as Domitian
White marble. Ca. 100
Roman Sculptor
Young Roman, formerly identified as Domitian
White marble. Ca. 100
Roman Sculptor

The refined features of this distinguished young man recall those of the Emperor Nerva (96-98 AD) and his hairstyle reflects that of the previous Emperor, Domitian (81-96 AD). But this head also has some individualised features. One of a series of the Twelve Emperors given by Pius V to Philip II in 1568, it is likely that at that time this portrait was considered to depict Domitian.

Portrait of a Young Man
White marble, Jasper. 1570 - 1600
Roman Sculptor
Portrait of a Young Man
White marble, Jasper. 1570 - 1600
Roman Sculptor

This is a modern copy of a Roman portrait of a young man from the period of the Emperor Commodus (180-192 AD). While the beard recalls portraits of Hadrian (such as E-176 in the Prado) and others from the Antonine period (E-113), the hairstyle suggests images of Alexander the Great. The subject may have been an officer in the Roman army.

Roman Woman
White marble. 150 - 155
Roman Sculptor
Roman Woman
White marble. 150 - 155
Roman Sculptor

The portrait is of a mature, high-class lady with a serene and somewhat tired expression. Like many portraits of its era, it imitates the hairstyles adopted in the imperial household, in this case of Faustina the Elder (105-141 B. C.), wife of the emperor Antoninus Pius.

Hadrian as a hero
White marble. Ca. 136
Roman Sculptor
Hadrian as a hero
White marble. Ca. 136
Roman Sculptor

In 136 A.D., two years before his death, Emperor Hadrian had the previous realism of his portraits replaced with an idealized image of him as a young hero. Gold coins with this portrait, minted during his last years as emperor, indicate that he was probably represented as New Romulus. The bust was added in the sixteenth-century.

Caracalla or Geta
White marble. 205 - 209
Taller Italiano; Roman Sculptor
Caracalla or Geta
White marble. 205 - 209
Taller Italiano; Roman Sculptor

Caracalla and Geta, sons of the Emperor Septimus Severus, were elected consuls in 205 AD and over the following years were depicted as twins. Their very short hairstyle, which reflected military fashion, was subsequently adopted by almost all the emperors of the period of Military Anarchy (3rd century AD). Caracalla murdered his brother in 211 AD and only outlived him for a few years.205-209 AD (h

The Emperor Antoninus Pius
White marble. Ca. 140
Roman Sculptor
The Emperor Antoninus Pius
White marble. Ca. 140
Roman Sculptor

Titus Aurelius Boionius Arrius Antoninus (86-161 A. D.) was adopted in 138 A. D. by the moribund emperor Hadrian to be his successor. His portrait, dating from shortly after, did not change during the whole of his reign. The effigy prolongs the style of Hadrian’s portraits, intending to emphasize the loyalty of Antoninus Pius to the pacifist policy of his predecessor.

The Empress Sabina
White marble. Ca. 130
Roman Sculptor
The Empress Sabina
White marble. Ca. 130
Roman Sculptor

This is the last portrait of Vibia Sabina (83-136 A. D.), wife of the emperor Hadrian. It does not represent her at her real age (some 48 years), but is a highly idealised and rejuvenated image. Her hairstyle is not a traditional roman one but is inspired by the imagery of the goddess of Diana. The portrait reflects the intention of making her appear ageless.

The Emperor Hadrian
White marble. 130 - 138
Roman Sculptor
The Emperor Hadrian
White marble. 130 - 138
Roman Sculptor

The image of Publius Aelius Hadrian (76-138 A. D.) did not change much during his rule (117-138 A. D.). This effigy shows him in his maturity, and can thus be dated between 130 and 138 A.D. Despite a degree of realism in his features, the emperor´s interest in idealization is visible here in the curly hair and short beard, which allude to his philosophical bent and his passion for Classical Greece

Deified Emperor
Marble. Ca. 50
Roman Sculptor
Deified Emperor
Marble. Ca. 50
Roman Sculptor

This sculpture consists of a seventeenth-century head of Augustus and a torso of Augustus or Tiberius dating from the beginning of the first century A.D. This type of iconography, with a body based on the art of Polycletus (fifth century B.C.) and clothed in the traditional Roman toga, was used to represent emperors deified after death. These statues were made for the temples of imperial worship.

Woman with a Flavian Hairstyle
White marble. 90 - 110
Roman Sculptor
Woman with a Flavian Hairstyle
White marble. 90 - 110
Roman Sculptor

Realism in the depiction of physical features is one of the characteristics of Roman portraiture. The hairstyle became a further identifying element, indicating the importance given to personal adornment and changes in fashion. Here the subject wears a false, curly hairpiece, a common practice among noblewomen of the period in emulation of the Emperor Titus’s daughter Julia Flavia (AD 64-91).

Prince Gaius Caesar
White marble. Ca. 13 a.C.
Roman Sculptor
Prince Gaius Caesar
White marble. Ca. 13 a.C.
Roman Sculptor

Gaius Caesar (20 B. C.- 4 A. D.) was adopted, together with his brother Lucius Caesar, in the year 16 B.C. by his grandfather the emperor Augustus, with a view to possibly having him succeed him. This portrait, created when the boy was seven years old, was conceived to be like a young version of the portrait of Augustus with a hairstyle very similar to that of the emperor.

Roman Matron
White marble. 85 - 120
Roman Sculptor
Roman Matron
White marble. 85 - 120
Roman Sculptor

Este retrato de una romana entrada en años y con una mirada que delata seguridad de sí misma impresiona aún hoy por su realismo bien dosificado. En tanto los rasgos faciales autenticos de la retratada, dan la impresión de haber sido reproducidos sin mayores modificaciones, las zonas de piel desnuda, en cambio, aparecen alisadas debido al pulimento de la superficie del marmol, de modo que la repres

Young Roman Woman
White marble. 225 - 250
Roman Sculptor
Young Roman Woman
White marble. 225 - 250
Roman Sculptor

La representada es una romana joven cuyos ojos grandes, con perforaciones profundas marcando las pupilas, miran hacia la derecha en actitud reflexiva. Como este, numerosos retratos de particulares realizados a finales de la época severiana documentan el florecimiento del retrato femenino y el gran prestigio de la mujer en una época en que Iulia Mamaea, la madre del emperador Alejandro Severo, era

Drusus the Younger
Marble. I century
Roman Sculptor
Drusus the Younger
Marble. I century
Roman Sculptor

The son and heir of Tiberius, Drusus the Younger was portrayed from his father’s assumption of imperial power in 14 A. D., until his own violent death at the hands of his wife in 23 A. D. The realism of his facial features pays tribute to the Republican tradition of the gens Claudia, the patrician family to which he belonged.

Augustus wearing a toga
White marble. Late I a.C. century
Roman Sculptor
Augustus wearing a toga
White marble. Late I a.C. century
Roman Sculptor

Two ancient fragments with a different origin were skilfully joined in the seventeenth century to create the statue. Augustus, clad in the toga of a Roman citizen, offers a sacrifice with his head covered, thereby demonstrating veneration of the gods. The portrait, less common than the other type in the Prado (E00119), offers a more realistic representation and a more natural hairstyle. Both portr

Trajan (?) in military costume
White marble. Ca. 100
Roman Sculptor
Trajan (?) in military costume
White marble. Ca. 100
Roman Sculptor

Originally, the statue was probably the effigy of the emperor Trajan (98-117 A. D.) as a general. The only ancient part of the sculpture is the torso covered with anatomical armour (thorax in Latin), adorned with the head of the Medusa and a trophy with two victories. The head, which copies a portrait of the era of Trajan, and the bottom part with the footwear, date from the seventeenth century an

Roman Patrician, formerly known as Nero
White marble. 65 - 70
Roman Sculptor
Roman Patrician, formerly known as Nero
White marble. 65 - 70
Roman Sculptor

This youth, with his distinctive features, has a hairstyle introduced under Nero (54-68 AD). The Emperor’s undulating locks scandalised the upper classes in Rome at the time but were highly appreciated by the jeunesse dorée. One of a series of the Twelve Emperors given by Pius V to Philip II in 1568, it is likely that at that time this portrait was considered to depict Nero.

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