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Coffered Ceiling
Polychromed, Carved. Ca. 1400
Anonymous
Coffered Ceiling
Polychromed, Carved. Ca. 1400
Anonymous

The principal beams are decorated with secular scenes, including dances, jousts or men fighting monsters, and with the coats-of-arms of Castile and León and those of the Luna and Rojas families. Other decoration includes sacred scenes (the Last Supper and the Last Judgement, for example). Between the transversal beams are panels with alternating castles and lions and elongated hexagonal pan

Portable oratory with the penitent Saint Jerome
Polychromed, Carved, Gilded. Ca. 1520
Juanes, Juan de (Vicente Juan Masip); Forment, Damián
Portable oratory with the penitent Saint Jerome
Polychromed, Carved, Gilded. Ca. 1520
Juanes, Juan de (Vicente Juan Masip); Forment, Damián

Este oratorio portátil es una pieza excepcional que aúna dos delicados trabajos de Damián Forment y Juan de Juanes, figuras fundamentales del Renacimiento en la Corona de Aragón. La representación central del conjunto es la placa de alabastro donde aparece san Jerónimo en su retiro penitencial en el desierto, aunque convertido éste en ámbito rocoso significado por el árbol del primer término en do

Roman Woman
White marble. 150 - 155
Roman Sculptor
Roman Woman
White marble. 150 - 155
Roman Sculptor

The portrait is of a mature, high-class lady with a serene and somewhat tired expression. Like many portraits of its era, it imitates the hairstyles adopted in the imperial household, in this case of Faustina the Elder (105-141 B. C.), wife of the emperor Antoninus Pius.

Hadrian as a hero
White marble. Ca. 136
Roman Sculptor
Hadrian as a hero
White marble. Ca. 136
Roman Sculptor

In 136 A.D., two years before his death, Emperor Hadrian had the previous realism of his portraits replaced with an idealized image of him as a young hero. Gold coins with this portrait, minted during his last years as emperor, indicate that he was probably represented as New Romulus. The bust was added in the sixteenth-century.

Apolo inspirado por la música
Carrara marble. 1814 - 1819
Álvarez Cubero, José
Apolo inspirado por la música
Carrara marble. 1814 - 1819
Álvarez Cubero, José

Apollo holds a lyre and in keeping with Praxitelean ideals adopts an elegant contraposto pose. The original version was commissioned by Antonio Canova to decorate the Real Casa del Labrador at Aranjuez, but during the Pensinsula War Álvarez Cubero was forced to sell it in order to survive. He later made this second version, which he never completed.

Penitent Mary Magdalene
Wood. 1664
Mena, Pedro de
Penitent Mary Magdalene
Wood. 1664
Mena, Pedro de

Mary Magdalene contemplates a crucifix she holds in her left hand. Her right hand is on her bosom, indicating her love and devotion to Jesus Christ. Her narrow, expressive face, sad gaze and slightly open mouth are framed by long hair that drapes across her back, shoulders and bust. The movement begun by her left foot is softened by a rough, rigid habit of palm fibers that hides this saint´s anato

Heroic Funerary Sculpture of a Boy
Marble. 80 - 110
Roman Sculptor
Heroic Funerary Sculpture of a Boy
Marble. 80 - 110
Roman Sculptor

The boy is depicted as a victorious athlete, with a foliate wreath on his head. His right arm was originally bent, his hand touching the wreath. He has individualised features and a hairstyle typical of the late first century AD. His parents intended this image to reflect an image of their son as one of the famous athletes of the past, happy in the other world.

Hermes-Sakkôn
Marble. 100 - 110
Roman Sculptor
Hermes-Sakkôn
Marble. 100 - 110
Roman Sculptor

This is a Roman copy of an Athenian original from the early fourth century B. C. Its archaising appearance responds not only to the hermae tradition but also to the oriental nature of this particular manifestation of the god Hermes, in keeping with a prototype created for a Phoenician sanctuary in the Piraeus, the harbour of Athens.

Small Kouros
Marble. Ca. 545 a.C.
Naxian Sculptor
Small Kouros
Marble. Ca. 545 a.C.
Naxian Sculptor

The kouroi (“young people”), statues of nude men with long hair and a somewhat stiff posture, based on Egyptian art, are the most representative sculptures in marble of the Greek Archaic Period. They were created from the seventh century B.C. onwards in the whole of Greece, frequently in monumental size. The statues may represent both humans and gods. On account of its small size, this statue prob

Apollo with Zither
White marble. 175 - 200
Roman Sculptor
Apollo with Zither
White marble. 175 - 200
Roman Sculptor

This statue is a Roman copy of a late Hellenistic statue (c. 100 B. C.) which, in turn, was inspired by the main statue of the temple of Apollo Sosianus in Rome, made by the Athenian sculptor Timarchides (c. 150 B. C.). The god is represented as the guide of the muses and the source of divine inspiration, playing his favourite instrument with his (now lost) right hand.

The Wrestlers
Serpentine. XVIII century
Anonymous
The Wrestlers
Serpentine. XVIII century
Anonymous

This is a version of the celebrated Hellenistic group which depicts two athletes engaging in a form of wrestling considered an Olympic sport in ancient Greece. Serpentine, known in the past as “green from Prato”, was used for ornamental pieces. Requiring tremendous technical skill to carve, it was not used by sculptors in Italy until the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

The Defence of Zaragoza
Carrara marble. 1818 - 1825
Álvarez Cubero, José
The Defence of Zaragoza
Carrara marble. 1818 - 1825
Álvarez Cubero, José

This is the most important work by the artist known as the “Spanish Canova”, in reference to the great master of Neo-classical sculpture, Antonio Canova, who was Álvarez Cubero’s master. The group was designed in the Castel Sant’Angelo in Rome where the sculptor was imprisoned in 1808 for refusing to accept Napoleon’s brother Joseph Bonaparte as King of Spain. The sculpture represents the s

Peace
Marble. 1811
Capellani, Antonio
Peace
Marble. 1811
Capellani, Antonio

This sculpture represents Victorious Peace: the figure wears a laurel wreath and holds an olive branch in her left hand, while in her right she has a blazing torch, with which she destroys the symbols of war at her feet. It was formerly attributed to the French sculptor Robert Michel (1720-1786) due to its classicist style.

Sappho
Marble. S XVI - XVII century
Anonymous
Sappho
Marble. S XVI - XVII century
Anonymous

Cabeza femenina con el pelo sujeto por una cinta y cubierto por un pañuelo. Por delante de las orejas caen dos pares de rizos sobre las mejillas. Este prototipo creado en Grecia fue tradicionalmente identificado como Safo, aunque también como ninfa o musa.Cacciotti (1994) opina que la cabeza del Museo del Prado pudo pertenecer a la colección Giustiniani, basándose en la identificación de un grabad

Portrait of a young Man
Marble. 161 - 170
Roman Sculptor
Portrait of a young Man
Marble. 161 - 170
Roman Sculptor

The sitter is depicted with a dense head of curly hair, a carefully trimmed beard, thin moustache, and a goatee beard between his mouth and chin. The young man’s elegant hairstyle imitates portraits of the Emperors Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus of 161 A. D. The military cloak indicates that the sitter had recently embarked on a military career.

Young Roman, formerly identified as Domitian
White marble. Ca. 100
Roman Sculptor
Young Roman, formerly identified as Domitian
White marble. Ca. 100
Roman Sculptor

The refined features of this distinguished young man recall those of the Emperor Nerva (96-98 AD) and his hairstyle reflects that of the previous Emperor, Domitian (81-96 AD). But this head also has some individualised features. One of a series of the Twelve Emperors given by Pius V to Philip II in 1568, it is likely that at that time this portrait was considered to depict Domitian.

Torso of a Youth
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor
Torso of a Youth
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor

This sculpture reproduces a Greek original of around 410 BC by a follower of Polyclitus. There are numerous copies of that work, known as the "Dresden Youth type" in reference to the best and most complete surviving example, now in the Albertinum in Dresden. From that work it is known that the young athlete was looking pensively at his left hand in which he held a now unknown object.

Boxer
Marble. 50 - 70
Roman Sculptor
Boxer
Marble. 50 - 70
Roman Sculptor

This is a Roman copy of an athlete, made in about 370 B. C. by one of Policlytus’s pupils, perhaps Daedalus of Sikion (act. 400-360 B. C.). From a version of the sculpture in Berlin, we know that he is tying a strap around his right wrist, with both forearms outstretched. The sensual appearance of the muscular and well-built body was achieved by smooth undulations on the surface.

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