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Crouching Aphrodite
White marble. Mid-IIcentury
Roman Sculptor
Crouching Aphrodite
White marble. Mid-IIcentury
Roman Sculptor

Roman copy of a crouching Aphrodite who originally had both arms raised to shake her long hair with her hands. The copy is based on a late Hellenistic original created circa 100 B. C. in Rhodes which, in turn, combines the figure of the famous Crouching Aphrodite by the sculptor Doidalsas of Bithynia (c. 250 B. C.) with a standing Aphrodite Anadyomene (rising from the waters) from the same period.

The Empress Sabina
White marble. Ca. 130
Roman Sculptor
The Empress Sabina
White marble. Ca. 130
Roman Sculptor

This is the last portrait of Vibia Sabina (83-136 A. D.), wife of the emperor Hadrian. It does not represent her at her real age (some 48 years), but is a highly idealised and rejuvenated image. Her hairstyle is not a traditional roman one but is inspired by the imagery of the goddess of Diana. The portrait reflects the intention of making her appear ageless.

Ariadne sleeping
White marble. 150 - 175
Roman Sculptor
Ariadne sleeping
White marble. 150 - 175
Roman Sculptor

En la pintura de Velázquez que representa una vista del jardín de la Villa Medici en Roma (P1211) se identifica en una logia la estatua de una figura yacente apenas esbozada por el artista. De la figura recostada, que en 1787 pasó a Florencia, al Palazzo Pitti, y posteriormente al Museo Arqueológico de aquella ciudad, ya entonces se conocían otras dos réplicas de tamaño mayor que el natural, en Ro

The Emperor Hadrian
White marble. 130 - 138
Roman Sculptor
The Emperor Hadrian
White marble. 130 - 138
Roman Sculptor

The image of Publius Aelius Hadrian (76-138 A. D.) did not change much during his rule (117-138 A. D.). This effigy shows him in his maturity, and can thus be dated between 130 and 138 A.D. Despite a degree of realism in his features, the emperor´s interest in idealization is visible here in the curly hair and short beard, which allude to his philosophical bent and his passion for Classical Greece

Young Roman, formerly identified as Domitian
White marble. Ca. 100
Roman Sculptor
Young Roman, formerly identified as Domitian
White marble. Ca. 100
Roman Sculptor

The refined features of this distinguished young man recall those of the Emperor Nerva (96-98 AD) and his hairstyle reflects that of the previous Emperor, Domitian (81-96 AD). But this head also has some individualised features. One of a series of the Twelve Emperors given by Pius V to Philip II in 1568, it is likely that at that time this portrait was considered to depict Domitian.

Torso of a Youth
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor
Torso of a Youth
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor

This sculpture reproduces a Greek original of around 410 BC by a follower of Polyclitus. There are numerous copies of that work, known as the "Dresden Youth type" in reference to the best and most complete surviving example, now in the Albertinum in Dresden. From that work it is known that the young athlete was looking pensively at his left hand in which he held a now unknown object.

Homer
White marble. II century
Roman Sculptor
Homer
White marble. II century
Roman Sculptor

This idealised portrait of the blind poet, author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, depicts him as an old, bearded man, a typology established in the 3rd century BC. In the 18th century the interest in establishing the appearance of figures from Antiquity led the bust’s owner, José Nicolás de Azara, to identify it as the philosopher Plato, whose name he had inscribed on it.

Portrait of a Young Man
White marble, Jasper. 1570 - 1600
Roman Sculptor
Portrait of a Young Man
White marble, Jasper. 1570 - 1600
Roman Sculptor

This is a modern copy of a Roman portrait of a young man from the period of the Emperor Commodus (180-192 AD). While the beard recalls portraits of Hadrian (such as E-176 in the Prado) and others from the Antonine period (E-113), the hairstyle suggests images of Alexander the Great. The subject may have been an officer in the Roman army.

Greek Youth
White marble. 200 - 217
Roman Sculptor
Greek Youth
White marble. 200 - 217
Roman Sculptor

The Greek word “neoni” inscribed on this portrait means “young”, but it could also be the name of this unknown sitter, Neon. With regard to his appearance, the hairstyle recalls that of Alexander the Great and the features those of Antinous. This head can be approximately dated to the period of the Emperor Caracalla, a great admirer of Alexander.

Fragments of a Roman sarcophagus with the Four Seasons
White marble. Ca. 250
Roman Sculptor
Fragments of a Roman sarcophagus with the Four Seasons
White marble. Ca. 250
Roman Sculptor

The cycle of the Four Seasons has a long tradition in figurative art. The personifications of the different periods of the year were accompanied by the element that identified them, all associated with the rural world. As part of a sarcophagus lid, this pair of reliefs makes clear reference to the passing of time.

Herm of the epic poet Homer
White marble. Third quarter of the I century
Roman Sculptor
Herm of the epic poet Homer
White marble. Third quarter of the I century
Roman Sculptor

Portraits of Homer, author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, the earliest works of Western literature (8th century B.C.), were made only many years after his death, when any reliable memories of his appearance had long disappeared. As Pliny the Younger (23-79 A.C.) noted, “If no portraits exist they are invented, out of a wish to know the features of someone like Homer, whose appearance has not been t

Hercules
White marble. Ca. 200
Roman Sculptor
Hercules
White marble. Ca. 200
Roman Sculptor

This Roman statue reproduces with some changes the Lansdowne Hercules (Malibu, Getty Museum) by a pupil of Polyclitus made about 350 B. C. In addition to inverting the two sides of the model, this work changes the facial expression which stands out on account of its emotiveness. The hero is shown in a victorious pose holding a club (currently restored) and the pelt of the lion of Nemea. The death

Woman with a Flavian Hairstyle
White marble. 90 - 110
Roman Sculptor
Woman with a Flavian Hairstyle
White marble. 90 - 110
Roman Sculptor

Realism in the depiction of physical features is one of the characteristics of Roman portraiture. The hairstyle became a further identifying element, indicating the importance given to personal adornment and changes in fashion. Here the subject wears a false, curly hairpiece, a common practice among noblewomen of the period in emulation of the Emperor Titus’s daughter Julia Flavia (AD 64-91).

Prince Gaius Caesar
White marble. Ca. 13 a.C.
Roman Sculptor
Prince Gaius Caesar
White marble. Ca. 13 a.C.
Roman Sculptor

Gaius Caesar (20 B. C.- 4 A. D.) was adopted, together with his brother Lucius Caesar, in the year 16 B.C. by his grandfather the emperor Augustus, with a view to possibly having him succeed him. This portrait, created when the boy was seven years old, was conceived to be like a young version of the portrait of Augustus with a hairstyle very similar to that of the emperor.

Venus of Madrid
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor
Venus of Madrid
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor

This sculpture is a Roman copy of a Hellenistic original dating from the second-first century B.C. Stripped of the baroque additions that distorted it, it is part of a large cycle of Venuses linked by similar postures. The beginning of this type of sculpture would seem to lie in a work by Lysipus or his school known through a Roman copy: the Venus of Capua. In it, the goddess, with a nude torso, l

Roman Matron
White marble. 85 - 120
Roman Sculptor
Roman Matron
White marble. 85 - 120
Roman Sculptor

Este retrato de una romana entrada en años y con una mirada que delata seguridad de sí misma impresiona aún hoy por su realismo bien dosificado. En tanto los rasgos faciales autenticos de la retratada, dan la impresión de haber sido reproducidos sin mayores modificaciones, las zonas de piel desnuda, en cambio, aparecen alisadas debido al pulimento de la superficie del marmol, de modo que la repres

Aegis-Bearing Jupiter
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor
Aegis-Bearing Jupiter
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor

The Roman image of Jupiter, inspired by a statue of Zeus from the fifth century B. C., shows the god wearing the aegis (protective cloak) which, according to Homer, was used by Zeus as a weapon to create clouds and thunderstorms. Zeus later gave it to Athena as a magic shield. The sculpture was restored to include a lightning bolt in the right hand.

Boar
White marble. Ca. 20
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor
Boar
White marble. Ca. 20
Anonymous; Roman Sculptor

Probablemente en el siglo XVII, un autor desconocido dividió mediante un corte longitudinal el torso de la estatua de un jabalí de tamaño natural en dos partes; luego, las completó y montó cada una de las dos mitades sobre un tablero liso de mármol de color. Aún hoy se percibe fácilmente que la cabeza del animal estaba levemente girada hacia la derecha. Originalmente el pesado cuerpo no descansaba

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