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Chaste Venus
Charcoal, White chalk on wove paper. XIX century
Madrazo y Agudo, José de
Chaste Venus
Charcoal, White chalk on wove paper. XIX century
Madrazo y Agudo, José de

The celebrated picador, Fernando del Toro, draws the fierce beast on with his pique
Red chalk, Red wash on wove paper. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The celebrated picador, Fernando del Toro, draws the fierce beast on with his pique
Red chalk, Red wash on wove paper. 1814 - 1816
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Here Goya bears witness to the prominence of the role of picadors in bullfights, showing both the triumphs and the calamities they face due to the risk inherent in their activity. He concentrates the lighting exclusively on three horses, one of which is dead, thus emphasizing their victimhood. The drawing offers an expressive confrontation of forces: the bulk of the dark bull against the white che

Bravo toro
Crayon lithography, Scraper on wove paper. 1825
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Bravo toro
Crayon lithography, Scraper on wove paper. 1825
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Although Goya had already shown an interest in lithography while in Madrid, it was in Bordeaux tht he fully explored the expressive possibilities of this new medium. In November 1825, a year after his arrival in the city, he made the four prints of the Bulls of Bordeaux, of which 100 copies were run off at the workshop of the celebrated lithographer Cyprien Gaulon. The lithograph suited the needs

What is the use of a cup?
Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
What is the use of a cup?
Etching, Aquatint, Wash, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 59, What is the use of a cup?. Goya devoted many of the prints in the first part of The Disasters of War to scenes in which the civilian population is the innocent victim of soldiers´ excesses, particularly with women presented as the object of the invaders´ sexual violence. Although the Disasters do not follow a strict order, there is a structure that allows us to see how Goya a

The Famous American Mariano Ceballos
Crayon lithography, Scraper on wove paper. 1825
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Famous American Mariano Ceballos
Crayon lithography, Scraper on wove paper. 1825
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Although Goya had already shown an interest in lithography while in Madrid, it was in Bordeaux tht he fully explored the expressive possibilities of this new medium. In November 1825, a year after his arrival in the city, he made the four prints of the Bulls of Bordeaux, of which 100 copies were run off at the workshop of the celebrated lithographer Cyprien Gaulon. The lithograph suited the needs

There is No Time Left
Drypoint, Etching, Wash, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
There is No Time Left
Drypoint, Etching, Wash, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Rather than simply reflecting concrete events, Goya sought to capture their essence. He therefore placed himself alongside the action, taking part in a way that no previous artist ever had. This explains the proximity of the figures presented in each of the Disasters, which are monumental and very close to the viewer, barely leaving room for anecdotal details in the background. It is possible to i

Plaza partida
Crayon lithography, Scraper on wove paper. 1825
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Plaza partida
Crayon lithography, Scraper on wove paper. 1825
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Although Goya had already shown an interest in lithography while in Madrid, it was in Bordeaux tht he fully explored the expressive possibilities of this new medium. In November 1825, a year after his arrival in the city, he made the four prints of the Bulls of Bordeaux, of which 100 copies were run off at the workshop of the celebrated lithographer Cyprien Gaulon. The lithograph suited the needs

Harvest of the Dead
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Harvest of the Dead
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 63, Harvest of the Dead.Goya devoted many of the prints in the first part of The Disasters of War to scenes in which the civilian population is the innocent victim of soldiers´ excesses, particularly with women presented as the object of the invaders´ sexual violence. Although the Disasters do not follow a strict order, there is a structure that allows us to see how Goya approach

It’s no use crying out
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
It’s no use crying out
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on ivory paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 58, It’s no use crying out. Goya devoted many of the prints in the first part of The Disasters of War to scenes in which the civilian population is the innocent victim of soldiers´ excesses, particularly with women presented as the object of the invaders´ sexual violence. Although the Disasters do not follow a strict order, there is a structure that allows us to see how Goya appr

The Worst is to beg
Etching, Wash, Burnisher on wove paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Worst is to beg
Etching, Wash, Burnisher on wove paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 55, The Worst is to beg. One of Goya’s most singular conceptual contributions in his series of prints, Disasters of War, is his manner of representing the role of women in the conflict. They sometimes appear as heroines, but are more often depicted as victims of abuse and violence. In his desire to convey the war’s dire consequences for all levels of the population, he made women

Dibersión de España
Lithography on wove paper. 1825
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Dibersión de España
Lithography on wove paper. 1825
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Although Goya had already shown an interest in lithography while in Madrid, it was in Bordeaux tht he fully explored the expressive possibilities of this new medium. In November 1825, a year after his arrival in the city, he made the four prints of the Bulls of Bordeaux, of which 100 copies were run off at the workshop of the celebrated lithographer Cyprien Gaulon. The lithograph suited the needs

Truth has died
Etching, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Truth has died
Etching, Burnisher on ivory paper. 1814 - 1815
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This scene, along with Disaster 80, Will she live again?, marks the end of the series of engravings that constitute the first edition of the Disasters of War (1863). Despite the apparent disorder visible in this series, it has an inner logic that presents the subjects more or less in groups, using titles to link the images and creating sequences in which the artist uses narrative tools to develop

The healthy and the sick
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The healthy and the sick
Etching, Aquatint, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1812 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 57, The healthy and the sick.Goya devoted many of the prints in the first part of The Disasters of War to scenes in which the civilian population is the innocent victim of soldiers´ excesses, particularly with women presented as the object of the invaders´ sexual violence. Although the Disasters do not follow a strict order, there is a structure that allows us to see how Goya app

Prince Baltasar Carlos on Horseback
Drypoint, Etching on white wove paper. 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Prince Baltasar Carlos on Horseback
Drypoint, Etching on white wove paper. 1778
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Entre 1777 y 1778 diversos ilustrados manifestaron su preocupación por la falta de grabadores que acometieran el proyecto de reproducir las pinturas que se conservaban en las colecciones españolas, fundamentalmente en los Palacios Reales, como medio para dar a conocer a nacionales y extranjeros la riqueza y el valor de nuestra pintura. Goya se hizo eco de esta idea y comenzó a grabar una serie de

Rabble
Drypoint, Etching, Wash, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Rabble
Drypoint, Etching, Wash, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War,28, Rabble.In this series of prints executed between 1810 and 1814 Goya offers a critical and personal vision of the consequences of the Spanish Peninsular War (1808-14) that is remote from the propagandistic images produced by his contemporaries. Through his etchings the artist condemned the irrationality of war and the brutality of both sides, which inevitably resulted in suffer

He deserved it
Drypoint, Etching, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
He deserved it
Drypoint, Etching, Burnisher, Burin on wove paper. 1810 - 1814
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Disasters of War, 29, He Deserved it. There have been efforts to identify the concrete events depicted in this print, but as Lafuente Ferrari pointed out, there were so many that it may be easier to believe that Goya chose a more abstract presentation to represent events so frequent that they constituted one of the fatal consequences of the war. This desire for abstraction, or rather, for universa

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