The itinerary <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> has been successfully created. Now you can add in works from the Collection browser
<em>TITULOOBRA</em> added to <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> itinerary

Search

Explore the collection

Refine results
32 results
Nymphs and Satyrs
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1615
Rubens, Peter Paul
Nymphs and Satyrs
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1615
Rubens, Peter Paul

In this picture, the setting epitomises the classical concept of a Locus amoenus ("pleasant place") which developed from the time of Homer and referred to an ideal place for sensual being, with flowing water that impregnates the land and shade provided by trees. Socrates describes such a place in Plato’s dialogue Phaedrus. Rubens’s Locus amoenus is recreated with such conviction that it makes me t

Dance of Mythological Figures and Villagers
Oil on panel. 1630 - 1635
Rubens, Peter Paul
Dance of Mythological Figures and Villagers
Oil on panel. 1630 - 1635
Rubens, Peter Paul

A group of figures dance to the tune of a flute played by a man perched on an oak tree, and to the bells that some dancers have attached to their lower legs. The scene evokes the dances that are part of Ancient Greek history and myths and the tradition that followed - the book Hypnerotomachia Poliphili includes a description and a woodcut of a similar dance. The painting also evokes the arcadian s

Figure of a Woman
Oil on canvas. 1636
Ribera, Jusepe de, lo Spagnoletto
Figure of a Woman
Oil on canvas. 1636
Ribera, Jusepe de, lo Spagnoletto

This work is a fragment of a painting that showed the visit of the god of wine to mortals, as is Detail of the Head of Bacchus (P-1123) and another painting in Bogotá. The work, based on an Hellenistic relief, may have formed a pair with A Sacrifice to Bacchus by Massimo Stanzione (P-259).

Bacchus and Ariadne
Oil on canvas. 1636 - 1638
Quellinus, Erasmus
Bacchus and Ariadne
Oil on canvas. 1636 - 1638
Quellinus, Erasmus

La historia de Ariadna y el dios tiene dos momentos fundamentales: uno es el encuentro entre ellos en la isla de Naxos después de que ésta fuera abandonada allí por Teseo, tema que representó Tiziano para Alfonso I de Este y que ceunta Ovidio en las Metamorfosis en el libro VIII (174-182): "(...) El hijo de Egeo raptó a la hija de Minos, largó velas rumbo a Día, y en aquella playa abandonó, cruel,

Dionysus (Bacchus)
Pencil on paper. Mid-XVIIIcentury
Ajello, Eutichio
Dionysus (Bacchus)
Pencil on paper. Mid-XVIIIcentury
Ajello, Eutichio

This drawing belongs to the Ajello Sketchbook, a group of fifty-nine unbound pencil drawings that were models for engraving to illustrate a descriptive calendar of sculptures that Philip V and his wife, Elizabeth of Farnesio, had gathered in the Royal Palace of La Granja de San Ildefonso.

Silenus and Sophocles
Pencil on paper. Mid-XVIIIcentury
Ajello, Eutichio
Silenus and Sophocles
Pencil on paper. Mid-XVIIIcentury
Ajello, Eutichio

This drawing belongs to the Ajello Sketchbook, a group of fifty-nine unbound pencil drawings that were models for engraving to illustrate a descriptive calendar of sculptures that Philip V and his wife, Elizabeth of Farnesio, had gathered in the Royal Palace of La Granja de San Ildefonso.

Dionysus
White marble. 75 - 100
Roman Sculptor
Dionysus
White marble. 75 - 100
Roman Sculptor

This Roman herm, which was probably made to decorate a theatre, uses an image of Dionysus in the form of a mask, created between 425 and 400 B. C. in Athens. At that time, it was usual to hang these masks, which only reproduce the god’s head, in the sanctuaries of Dionysus for his worship. The archaic hairstyle is also repeated in masks of the Classical period.

Dionysus with a Panther
White marble. Ca. 135
Roman Sculptor
Dionysus with a Panther
White marble. Ca. 135
Roman Sculptor

A work from the period of the emperor Hadrian which combines stylistic elements from the early classical period (490-470 B. C.) with others from the end of the fourth century B. C. Currently missing are the thyrsus, supported like a lance with the left hand, the head with its long hair tied back and crowned with ivy, and the cantharus of wine which Dionysus held in his right hand. According to the

Dionysus
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor
Dionysus
White marble. Ca. 150
Roman Sculptor

The Roman copy of a late Hellenistic model (125-100 B. C.) which, on account of its relaxed posture, recalls Praxiteles’ art. The god, who is leaning on a herm, a distinctive feature of the late first century B. C., personifies the abundance of a good life through his soft, sensual body. He was also worshipped in Antiquity as the benefactor of humanity for his gift of wine.

Dionysus and his Entourage
White marble. Ca. 50 a.C.
Hellenistic Workshop
Dionysus and his Entourage
White marble. Ca. 50 a.C.
Hellenistic Workshop

The static figure of Dionysus appears in the midst of the uncontrolled dance of his entourage, leaning on a small satyr, his servant. The relief highlights the contrast between his thoughtful posture and the enthusiasm of the satyr-flautist, and also between the soft body of the god and the muscles of the satyr. The other Maenads and satyrs who complemented the frieze of this decorative krater are

Dance in honour of Dionysus
White marble. 50 A.C. - 30 a.C.
Hellenistic Workshop
Dance in honour of Dionysus
White marble. 50 A.C. - 30 a.C.
Hellenistic Workshop

Silenus, satyrs and Maenads accompanied Dionysus from his mythical childhood. Their dance was performed at all the satirical plays of Athens and repeated in the Dionysian cults. The drum and the double flute, tied onto the head of the satyr with the strings clearly visible, produced the exciting bacchic music. These reliefs were either embedded in the painted walls of Roman mansions or displayed o

Dionysus (Bacchus)
White marble. 190 - 210
Anonymous
Dionysus (Bacchus)
White marble. 190 - 210
Anonymous

This Roman work is based on a classical Greek model by the School of Polyclitus (c. 400 B. C.) known as the Dresden Ephebe. The statue of the athlete was transformed into the god of wine in the Roman period and a new head was added with a Dionysian band, an ivy wreath and grapes. The hands holding a goblet and grapes were added in the seventeenth century.

Boy wearing an Ivy Wreath
White marble. 115 A.C. - 100 a.C.
Anonymous
Boy wearing an Ivy Wreath
White marble. 115 A.C. - 100 a.C.
Anonymous

This is a late Hellenistic head set on a bust, the tiger skin transforming the subject into a young Dionysus. The ivy wreath, over which another bronze one would have been placed, tends to confirm this identification although the hairstyle is not the habitual type for depictions of the god of wine. This may be the head of one of the so-called “mute servants” that decorated Roman residences.

Head of a Male Goat
White marble. 15 - 30
Anonymous
Head of a Male Goat
White marble. 15 - 30
Anonymous

This head of a goat, formerly in the collection of the Marquis of Carpio (1629-1687), is a fragment of a sculpture depicting a common subject in Antiquity, in which a small rider (Bacchus, Cupid or Venus) is mounted on the animal. On the right of the head are remains of a hand that would have been clutching the goat’s hair.

Bacchus
Marble. 125 - 150
Anonymous
Bacchus
Marble. 125 - 150
Anonymous

El pequeño torso de mármol fue completado acertadamente como Baco o como Dioniso por el restaurador del siglo XVII. La estatuilla se ajusta a un tipo de representación muy difundida de Dioniso, quien aparece por primera vez en las artes menores hacia 200 a.C. En cuanto a la composición, se remonta a una famosa estatua de Apolo Liceo, probablemente de Praxíteles, que había sido instalada en el Lice

Antinous of Bithynia
Marble. First half of the XVI century
Anonymous
Antinous of Bithynia
Marble. First half of the XVI century
Anonymous

Antinous (c. 105-130 AD), the Emperor Hadrian’s favourite, was deified with the name of Osiris to commemorate his death in the Nile and he was venerated as a god under the Roman Empire. By the fifteenth century his beautiful head with its ideal features had become the model for numerous artists. The present bust, which depicts him as a satyr with small horns, was acquired in Italy by the Spanish p

Krater with reliefs of a Centaur Fighting
White marble, Italian marble. Ca. 50 a.C.
Roman Sculptor
Krater with reliefs of a Centaur Fighting
White marble, Italian marble. Ca. 50 a.C.
Roman Sculptor

The central part of a late Hellenistic marble krater. The receptacle has high reliefs which show the mythical fight of the lapiths against the centaurs, understood in the fifth century B. C. as a symbol of the fight between Greek civilisation and Persian savagery. The figures reproduce the design which the famous painter Parrhasius made circa 420 B. C. to adorn the shield of Phidias’s Athena Proma

Dionysiac Party
Marble. 50 A.C. - 25 a.C.
Roman Sculptor
Dionysiac Party
Marble. 50 A.C. - 25 a.C.
Roman Sculptor

Queen Christina of Sweden’s famous puteal is not a parapet (puteal in Latin), but an altar from the garden of a Roman villa (the top is currently missing). The different scenes of the relief show several moments of a Dionysiac party in a sacred enclosure with its commemorative columns, altars, a Priapus herm and a sacred tree with a grapevine. The dance, music and drunkenness scenes interchange wi

Up