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Portrait of Queen María Luisa
Oil on unlined canvas. 1790
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de (Copy)
Portrait of Queen María Luisa
Oil on unlined canvas. 1790
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de (Copy)

Upon the death of Charles III, Goya was asked to paint portraits of the new monarchs, Charles Bourbon IV and his wife, María Luisa of Parma. As a recently named Royal Painter, the artist was responsible for supplying portraits of the Royal Family; aided by several painters in his workshop, he was required to fulfill the commissions of numerous different institutions and private citizens thr

María Luisa de Parma, Queen of Spain
Oil on canvas. 1789 - 1792
Maella, Mariano Salvador
María Luisa de Parma, Queen of Spain
Oil on canvas. 1789 - 1792
Maella, Mariano Salvador

This canvas, which retains its original frame, was painted around 1789 as a pair to a portrait of Charles IV to mark the couple`s ascent to the throne, referred to by the crown, sceptre and ermine mantle. Maella later added the sash of the Order of María Luisa, founded by the Queen in 1792, and simplified the hair ornament to take the form of a jewel with attached feather.

María Luisa of Parma, Princess of Asturias
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1765
Mengs, Anton Raphael
María Luisa of Parma, Princess of Asturias
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1765
Mengs, Anton Raphael

Mengs painted these portraits of the heirs to the Spanish throne -the prince and princess of Asturias, Carlos de Borbón and Maria Luisa of Parma- on the occasion of their wedding. As the daughter of Philip I, Duke of Parma, and Louise Isabelle of France, and thus granddaughter of Kings Philip V and Louis XV, Maria Luisa was Queen Consort of Spain between 1788 and 1808. She wears a light-col

Portrait of Queen María Luisa as Princess of Asturias
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1765
Mengs, Anton Raphael (Replica)
Portrait of Queen María Luisa as Princess of Asturias
Oil on canvas. Ca. 1765
Mengs, Anton Raphael (Replica)

Mengs had a profound influence on the younger generation of Spanish painters, notably on the Bayeus, Maella, Inza, Goya and Vicente López Portaña. His Neoclassical style was diametrically opposed to Tiepolo´s, whose style and paintings were falling out of fashion. The Spanish Collections hold many of his portraits. He was a refined and skyfull court painter with exquisite technique,

Maria Luisa of Parma
Oil on canvas. 1765 - 1769
Mengs, Anton Raphael
Maria Luisa of Parma
Oil on canvas. 1765 - 1769
Mengs, Anton Raphael

El cuadro muestra a la futura reina de España, hija de Felipe de Borbón (1720-1765) y de Luisa Isabel de Francia, duques de Parma. Nació en la capital del ducado el 9 de diciembre de 1751; contrajo matrimonio con su primo el príncipe de Asturias, más tarde Carlos IV, el 5 de septiembre de 1765; fueron reyes entre 1788 y 1808; falleció en el exilio, en Roma, el 2 de enero de 1819, unos días antes q

Female Portrait
Oil on canvas attached to plastic. Ca. 1900
Anonymous
Female Portrait
Oil on canvas attached to plastic. Ca. 1900
Anonymous

Reproducción de un retrato pintado hacia 1740-45. La dama representada guarda cierto parecido con Luisa Isabel de Borbón (1727-1759), hija de Luis XV y María Leszczynska, esposa del infante Felipe de Borbón, duque de Parma (1720-1765). A mediados del siglo XVIII, el retrato miniatura se pintaba sobre vitela o marfil y rara vez se optó por pintar al óleo sobre naipes o chapas de cobre; es excepcion

Dogs on a Leash
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Dogs on a Leash
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

A tapestry cartoon with two chained dogs, two shotguns, a powder horn, and other hunting implements on a small hill, with a landscape in the background. The resulting tapestry was intended to hang over one of the doors of the dining room of the Prince and Princess of Asturias (the future Carlos IV and his wife, Maria Luis de Parma) at the Monastery of El Escorial. It´s intended location expl

A Hunter with his Hounds
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
A Hunter with his Hounds
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This cartoon is for a tapestry to hang in a corner next to a door or window and is the pair to Hunter loading his Rifle (P-5539). Goya creates a perfect fusion between the figure and the natural setting and also suggests the close relation between the hunter and his two dogs, whom he seems to be urging on.The sinuous upward movement of the tree strengthens this vertical composition. The painting i

Decoy Hunting
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Decoy Hunting
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This is a hunting stand with two caged birds as decoys, a crouching dog, and a net on the tree that frames the group. The study of the birds and dog, as well as the bush in the foreground, reveal Goya´s interest in flora and fauna, which he paints with precision. The mitte owl, a nocturnal bird, is quite similar to the owl Goya used in his drawings and etchings as a personification of evil f

Hunting Party
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Hunting Party
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

Goya uses a single work to present two types of hunting —on foot and on horseback— and various types of individuals. In the foreground, one hunter shoots quail while another follows his dog, which smells prey hiding among the bushes. In the background, two riders hunt a hare being coursed by greyhounds. The study of animals and movement is this work´s greatest contribution. The white horse is base

Hunter loading his Rifle
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Hunter loading his Rifle
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon shows a hunter loading a shotgun, with a dog lying at his feet and other hunters behind him. This work is as fine example of Goya´s interest in Nature. He perfectly integrates the hunter´s figure among the sinuous silhouettes of the trees whose vertical elongation fits the format of this composition. The resulting tapestry was intended to hang in the dining room o

The Angler
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Angler
Oil on canvas. 1775
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

In this work, Goya represented two different country activities. The background shows hunters, but the foreground has a boy fishing in a river, which gives this work its title. This was a cartoon for one of the tapestries in the Prince and Princess of Asturias´ dining room at El Escorial. In it, the artist resolves the relation of the different planes with greater freedom than in other examp

The Picnic
Oil on canvas. 1776
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Picnic
Oil on canvas. 1776
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon represents a popular scene of Majos and Majas on the banks of Madrid´s Manzanares River. The Hermitage of the Virgin of the Port is just visible behind a group of trees on the right. Worthy of mention in this work are the still life in the foreground and the amorous play among the orange-seller and the Majos. The resultant tapestry was intended to hang in the dining roo

Dance on the Banks of the Manzanares
Oil on canvas. 1776 - 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
Dance on the Banks of the Manzanares
Oil on canvas. 1776 - 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon represents a popular scene of Majos and Majas dancing Seguidillas on the banks of Madrid´s Manzanares River. In the background, Goya painted the area around the Pontones Bridge, near la Quinta del Sordo, the land and house he bought in 1819. The resultant tapestry was intended to hang in the dining room of the Prince and Princess of Asturias (the future Carlos IV and hi

A Fight at the Venta Nueva
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
A Fight at the Venta Nueva
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon represents a quarrel among men in front of a tavern which Goya calls the New Tavern. The area near Madrid now called “Ventas,” and tknown as “Ventas del Espíritu Santo” in Goya´s time, was frequented by muleteers, caleche drivers, troublemakers and gamblers, as Goya illustrates here. The cards thrown on the table seem to be the origin of the dispute. The subject recall

An Avenue in Andalusia, or The Maja and the Cloaked Men
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
An Avenue in Andalusia, or The Maja and the Cloaked Men
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This cartoon depicts an encounter between a young woman in elaborate traditional costume and her partner, described by Goya in his bill to the Tapestry Manufactory as a “gypsy man and woman”. Accompanying them are various sinister looking cloaked men. This scene of love and jealousy takes place in a park with dense Mediterranean pines enclosed by a fence, a location described by the artist in his

The Drinker
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Drinker
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon depicts five people. The young man in the foreground is drinking from a wineskin while his companion eats a chive or tender onion. This scene has been interpreted as an allegory of gluttony, represented here by the boy with the cane and the blind drinker who are the main characters from the picaresque novel, Lazarillo de Tormes. The di sotto in sù perspective indicates

The Parasol
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de
The Parasol
Oil on canvas. 1777
Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de

This tapestry cartoon depicts a young woman. She is sitting, with a dog on her lap, and is accompanied by a Majo who protects her from the sun with a parasol. This work's format and bottom-to-top perspective indicates that it was intended to hang over a window. It's pyramidal composition, with the figures in the foreground, reflects the influence of classical Italian painting on Goya, as well as h

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