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Sánchez, Mariano Ramón

Valencia, 1740 - Valencia (Spain), 1822

At the age of seven, this Spanish painter and miniaturist moved to Madrid, where he entered the Academy of San Fernando in 1752. Fifteen years later, he painted a likeness of Saint Charles Borromeo on a small sheet of copper to decorate the Prince and Princess of Asturias' portable prayer stand, a commission he shared with Luis Meléndez Valdés. He used that same technique in a series of scenes for the cloister of the Convent of Santo Tomás, but he turned to canvas for various images of Our Lady of Mercy and several miniature portraits in an unsuccessful attempt to enter royal service. Moving to the Portuguese court, he made several miniatures for Joseph I and the future Queen Mary. After returning to Madrid in the early 1760s, he was elected academician of merit for miniatures. In 1781, Charles III commissioned him to paint an extensive collection of panoramic views of paths, ports, bays, islands and arsenals on the Iberian Peninsula. These large-format canvases were intended to decorate the Prince of Asturias and future King Charles IV's cabinet of seascapes. That commission reflects the Enlightenment's fondness for describing places, and its artistic precedents lie in Joseph Vernet's views of ports and other series of topographical paintings from that period. Unlike Vernet, or the views of Basque ports that the king had assigned to Luis Paret y Alcázar, Sánchez eschewed artistic interpretations of the landscape. Instead, he sought to capture the topography as faithfully as possible, and often depicted each location from several different viewpoints. Beginning in Cadiz, he traveled to Seville and Cordoba in 1783, moving on the Malaga two years later. There he painted views of the Mediterranean coast as far as Alicante. By 1784, he was in Valencia, where he included images of the adjacent islands, including Majorca, and the coast of Catalonia. Despite tireless work—by 1792 he had already painted fifty-eight views—his request for appointment as the king's chamber painter was again rejected. He continued work on the same project for several more years, traveling to northern Spain and La Coruña. After returning to court in the mid-1790s, he painted the main plaza in Badajoz, the bridges in Mérida and Alcántara, and the royal seats of El Escorial and Aranjuez before moving to Granada. In 1803, after completing 118 works (most now at Patrimonio Nacional), Mariano Sánchez grew ill and finally retired from a painting project that had occupied almost all of his artistic career. He was succeeded by Antonio Carnicero, who had already participated in it (Reuter, A. in: Enciclopedia M.N.P., 2006, vol. VI, pp. 1970-1971).

Artworks (17)

Vista de Puerto Real por el Este
Oil on canvas, Ca. 1782
Sánchez, Mariano Ramón
Vista del muelle de Alicante
Oil on canvas, 1781 - 1803
Sánchez, Mariano Ramón
View of the Port of Santa María
Oil on canvas, 1781 - 1785
Sánchez, Mariano Ramón
The San Telmo Tower
Oil on canvas, 1781 - 1803
Sánchez, Mariano Ramón
Landscape
Oil on canvas, 1781 - 1803
Sánchez, Mariano Ramón
Landscape with river and boat
Oil on canvas, 1781 - 1803
Sánchez, Mariano Ramón
Landscape
Oil on canvas, 1781 - 1803
Sánchez, Mariano Ramón
Vista del arsenal de La Carraca
Oil on canvas, 1781 - 1803
Sánchez, Mariano Ramón
Vista de Puerto Real por Poniente
Oil on canvas, 1781 - 1803
Sánchez, Mariano Ramón

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