Adam and Eve, Titian

Among other features of particular interest with regard to the museological criteria that have determined this new hanging of the Museum Collections are two interesting encounters. The first is between Titian's Adam and Eve and Rubens's version of that subject, to be seen in the area of the Central Gallery devoted to Venetian painting, while the second is between Rubens's copy of Titian's Rape of Europa (the original of which is in Boston) and Velázquez's The Spinners. In the latter, Velázquez paid tribute to Titian's painting by depicting The Rape on the tapestry woven by Arachne in the competition with the goddess Minerva. Rubens and Velázquez's works are now on display in the same room.

Another juxtaposition likely to arouse great interest is the view to be obtained from the centre of the Gallery (room 27) of three of the most important portraits in the history of western art: Charles V at the Battle of Mühlberg by Titian, located in this section, Las Meninas by Velázquez, looking directly across to that work in room 12; and The Family of Charles IV by Goya, to be seen in the distance in the room that connects with the final section of the Central Gallery (room 32).

With regard to the Italian paintings that occupy the first and second sections of the Central Gallery (rooms 25 and 26), a particularly striking juxtaposition is the one between two remarkable depictions of Venus and Adonis, the first by Paolo Veronese of around 1580 and the second by Annibale Carracci of around ten years later, painted in his most Venetian manner.

Among works from the Spanish school displayed in the rooms adjoining the Gallery, a particularly close dialogue has been established (albeit across different rooms) between the two most important depictions of The Trinity in the Museo del Prado: the version by El Greco painted in Toledo in 1577-79 and the one executed by Ribera in Naples in the 1630s.

 
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