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Willaerts, Adam
London, 1577 - Utrecht, 1664
Willaerts, Adam
London, 1577 - Utrecht, 1664

He arrived in Holland around 1602 and was accepted as a citizen of Utrecht in 1608. His first surviving painting dates from that year, A Fleet from the Dutch East India Company heading East arriving on an Island off the West Coast of Africa. In 1611, he was a founding member of the Utrecht Guild of Saint Luke, where he repeatedly held the position of dean (1620–1622, 1624–1631 and 1636–1637). Desp

Coccapani, Sigismondo
Florence, 1583 - Florence, 1643
Coccapani, Sigismondo
Florence, 1583 - Florence, 1643

A student of the architect Bernardo Buontalenti (c. 1531-1608) and of Cigoli (1559-1613), together with the latter, he frescoed the dome of the Pauline Chapel in S. Maria Maggiore, Rome, c. 1610-1612. His first work to have been executed without assistance seems to have been a fresco depicting S. Antonio Taking Away Money from Two False Mendicants (1613) in the cloister of S. Marco, Florence. Ther

Candid, Pieter
Bruges, H. 1548 - Munich, 1628
Candid, Pieter
Bruges, H. 1548 - Munich, 1628

A Netherlander by birth, Candid moved to Florence with his father, the bronze-caster Elias de Witte, when he was about ten years old. Biographical details are provided by Karel van Mander (1548-1606), whom he met in that city in 1574. According to van Mander, Candid assisted Vasari (1511-1574) with the decoration of the interior of the Sala Regia in the Vatican, as well as with the cupola of Flore

Snyders, Frans
Antwerp, 1579 - Antwerp, 1657
Snyders, Frans
Antwerp, 1579 - Antwerp, 1657

Snyders is one of the 17th-century Flemish painters of highest repute, both for his still lifes and for his hunting scenes, and was very well known and appreciated, particularly in Spain. Considering that one of the major specialities of the Flemish schools is animal paintings, its artists were truly geniuses at inventing the most varied hunting scenes and compositions in which beasts played a pre

Rubens, Peter Paul
Siegen, Westphalia (Germany), 1577 - Antwerp (Belgium), 1640
Rubens, Peter Paul
Siegen, Westphalia (Germany), 1577 - Antwerp (Belgium), 1640

No other 17th-century European painter combined artistic talent, social and economic success and a high cultural level like Rubens. Though primarily a painter, he also made numerous designs for prints, tapestries, architecture, sculpture and decorative objects. His abundant work is strikingly versatile in its subject matter, including paintings on mythological, religious and historical subjects as

Peeters, Clara
Antwerp (?), Ca. 1588/90 - Antwerp (?), Post. 1621
Peeters, Clara
Antwerp (?), Ca. 1588/90 - Antwerp (?), Post. 1621

Because all the information that we have on Clara Peeters comes from her paintings, we have to content ourselves with trying to piece together a limited biography. Her first picture dates from 1607. Her place of birth is not documented, but there are reasons to think that she based her career in Antwerp. A painting in a collection in Amsterdam is described in a document from 1635 as: "a sugar banq

Passignano
Passignano, 1559 - Florence, 1638
Passignano
Passignano, 1559 - Florence, 1638

He studied in Florence under Girolamo Macchietti (1535-1592) and Giovanni Battista Naldini (c. 1537-1591), but his principal master was Federico Zuccaro (1540/41-1609), whit whom he worked from 1575 to 1579 on the fresco decoration of the cupola of Florence Cathedral, left incomplete at Vasari’s death. Following periods of activity in Rome (1580-1582) and Venice (1582-1588), Passignano returned to

Pantoja de la Cruz, Juan
Valladolid (Spain), Ca. 1553 - Madrid (Spain), 1608
Pantoja de la Cruz, Juan
Valladolid (Spain), Ca. 1553 - Madrid (Spain), 1608

A painter of religious works, still lifes and some frescoes, Juan Pantoja de la Cruz began his career as a portraitist during the reign of Philip II after collaborating with Alonso Sánchez Coello in the final years of the latter's career. He had previously learned his trade in other European courts, where the influence of Antonis Mor was considerable. His finest works are unmistakeable for their s

Leoni, Pompeo
Milan, hacia 1533 - Madrid, 1608
Leoni, Pompeo
Milan, hacia 1533 - Madrid, 1608

Working with his father, Leone Leoni, on all his pieces, Italian sculptor Pompeo Leoni was able to create a workshop in Madrid and to undertake projects beside the El Escorial altarpiece that obliged him to make repeated and lengthy visits to Milan. On September 28, 1556 he arrived in Spain with a series of imperial portraits and was assigned a salary of 30 ducats a month by the Queen Regent, Joan

González, Bartolomé
Valladolid (Spain), 1564 - Madrid (Spain), 1627
González, Bartolomé
Valladolid (Spain), 1564 - Madrid (Spain), 1627

This Spanish painter was a disciple of Patricio Cajés in Valladolid, and of Juan Pantoja de la Cruz, whom he succeeded to the post of royal painter along with Rodrigo de Villandrando, Pedro Antonio Vidal, Santiago Morán and Andrés López. After the court moved from his native Valladolid to Madrid, he became the king's painter, filling the post left by Fabricio Castello's death in 1617. His testamen

Carducho, Bartolomé
Florence (Italy), Ca. 1560 - Madrid (Spain), 1608
Carducho, Bartolomé
Florence (Italy), Ca. 1560 - Madrid (Spain), 1608

Of this Italian painter, sculptor and architect, Ceán Bermúdez observed: "Few painters from Italy have been as useful for the fine arts in Spain as Carducho." And indeed, he is a key figure for understanding the development of painting at the Spanish court at the beginning of the 17th century. This is due not so much to his work as to the school of artists that trained under him, beginning with h

Cardi, Ludovico
Castelvecchio di Cigoli, Tuscany, 1559 - Rome, 1613
Cardi, Ludovico
Castelvecchio di Cigoli, Tuscany, 1559 - Rome, 1613

A student of the Florentine painters Alessandro Allori (1535-1607) and Santi di Tito (1536-1602), and of the architect Bernardo Buontalenti (1536-1608). During the early 1580s Cigoli painted two lunettes in the Chiostro Grande of S. Maria Novella, Florence. In the same decade he also received numerous commissions from the Medici family, such as that to design decorations to celebrate the marriage

Cajés, Eugenio
Madrid, 1574 - Madrid (Spain), 1634
Cajés, Eugenio
Madrid, 1574 - Madrid (Spain), 1634

He was a disciple of his father, Italian painter Patricio Cajés, who had moved to Madrid to work on the monastery of El Escorial. He is thought to have spent time in Rome around 1595, where he would have taken part in the birth of Caravaggio's naturalism, and he must have returned to Spain with a fondness for Tempesta's battle compositions, which Vicente Carducho's generation knew through prints a

Boscoli, Andrea
Florence (?), H. 1560 - Rome, 1608
Boscoli, Andrea
Florence (?), H. 1560 - Rome, 1608

Boscoli was a prolific draftsman. A student in the school of Santi di Tito (1536-1602), much of his knowledge was, however, self-taught. Time spent in Rome -probably early in the 1580s- enabled him to study both the antique and the more recent work of Polidoro da Caravaggio (c. 1499-c. 1543). Boscoli had returned to Florence by 1582, and thereafter he executed numerous private commissions, for the

Balen, Hendrick van
Antwerp, 1575 - 1632
Balen, Hendrick van
Antwerp, 1575 - 1632

He received his training from Adam van Noort and Martin de Vos. In 1592–1593, he entered the Guild of Saint Luke as a master in the city of Antwerp. Shortly afterwards, he travelled to Italy where he remained until 1600–1602, visiting Rome and Venice. There is no record of his works from his time in Italy, although his early paintings reveal a great similarity to the works of Annibale Carracci and

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