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Joaquín Sorolla (1863-1923)

26.05.2009 - 13.09.2009

Joaquín Sorolla (1863-1923) is the first major, monographic exhibition to be devoted to the artist since the one also organised in the Casón del Buen Retiro by the Ministry of Science and Education in 1963. It is also one of the most important ever organised, in Spain and abroad on this great 19th-century painter, both with regard to the number of works and their quality. The exhibition brings together around one hundred paintings by Sorolla, the most internationally known Spanish artist of his day and one of the key figures in the history of Spanish art. It offers a comprehensive survey based on examples of his finest works and includes the fourteen panels known as the Vision of Spain painted for The Hispanic Society of America, which were brought to Spain in 2007 by Bancaja, sponsor of the present exhibition.

Besides the collaboration of numerous private collections and institutions all around the world, the contribution of the Museo Sorolla (Madrid) deserves a special thanks, since it loans a group of fourteen works among them some of the artist's masterpieces.

The exhibition has a fundamentally chronological structure, organised into various sections that emphasise the importance of the various themes and subjects that Sorolla depicted at different periods in his career. For example, there is a space dedicated to the paintings of social themes that brought the artist fame in the last decades of the 19th century. This is followed by a sizeable group of portraits and a nude that reveal the profound influence of Velázquez on his compositions during the early years of the 20th century. Another area displays his finest beach scenes, painted in 1908 and 1909. Due to their particular importance and large size, the fourteen panels of Visions of Spain painted for the Hispanic Society of America will fill an entire room of the four occupied by the exhibition. This spectacular group was the most complex and important decorative scheme of Sorolla’s entire career and can also be seen as an epilogue and summary of his entire oeuvre. The exhibition ends with examples of his landscape paintings.

Curators:
José Luis Díez, Head of 19th Painting Department and Javier Barón, 19th Painting Department

Access

Room A, B, C y D. Jerónimos Building

Opening time

Tuesdays to Sundays, from 9am to 8pm. 11, 12 and 13 September 9am to 12am

Supported by:
Bancaja

Multimedia

Exhibition

1884 - 1892: the academic perfection

1884 - 1892: the academic perfection
And They Still Say Fish is Expensive! Joaquín Sorolla. Oil on canvas, 151.5 x 204 cm. 1894. Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado.

Following his years as a student at the Royal Academy of San Carlos, Sorolla travelled to Italy with a scholarship from the Provincial Council of Valencia. During his stay there, he spent time in Rome and the small town of Assisi, where he perfected his academic training. The study of the nude and the opportunity to familiarize himself with old and modern masters in Italy played a decisive role in his formation as an artist. But the grant also allowed him to visit the other artistic capital of the period, Paris, where he was exposed to the academic realism that would inspire him to paint social themes. Upon his return to Spain, Sorolla settled in Madrid, where he successfully participated in several National Fine Art Exhibitions. In these events he presented his most committed paintings in this new genre. And They Still Say Fish is Expensive! sums up his ambitious efforts at the time to strike a balance between subjects of a contained dramatic nature, and realistic execution with special attention to light, which began to emerge as his chief concern. These public successes also brought him his fi rst commissions for private collectors, paintings that refl ected attractive popular themes in which Sorolla gradually introduced his bold artistic innovations.

Around 1895: the first international successes

Around 1895: the first international successes
Return from Fishing. Joaquín Sorolla. Oil on canvas, 265 x 325 cm. 1894. Paris, Musée d’Orsay.

Return from Fishing was Sorolla’s first major international success. Shown at the 1895 Paris Salon, it marked his debut on the European stage and consolidated his reputation in Spain. Sorolla’s stay in the French capital also infl uenced his work in canvases such as After the Bath, which shows a shift in taste towards the academic style that dominated the Parisian market. Sewing the Sail confirmed his previous success. The pictorial representation of the effects of sunlight that characterize these two major works increasingly drew the artist’s attention, becoming the true hallmark of his art. This quest to portray sunlight, using the sails of fi shing boats as his best resource, led to Eating on the Boat, a painting in which the sail also enabled the artist to enclose the space where the action unfolds.

These same years saw the rise in Sorolla’s international reputation echoed by a greater interest on the part of private clients to buy his work. To meet this demand, he increasingly painted popular genre subjects and began a successful career as a portrait painter.

1900: the Grand Prix at the World Fair

1900: the Grand Prix at the World Fair
Sad Inheritance, Joaquín Sorolla. Oil on canvas, 212 x 288 cm. 1899. Bancaja Collection.

Sad Inheritance established Sorolla’s reputation in Paris and secured his status on the international scene. The impact of this work, which earned him the Grand Prix at the 1900 World Fair, made him the most successful living Spanish painter, confi rming critical interest in his art—an art that explored nature with sincerity and had the seashore as the privileged setting for his paintings. From then on, we see a change in the execution of his work. In canvases such as Mending the Sails, the brushstrokes became freer and more energetic, in search of a more direct portrayal of the depicted moment and a more faithful rendition of the effect of light. Preparing Raisins shows a progression towards a much more daring modernity, in which contemporary social themes are subordinated to the pure expression of an image.

Mother, on the other hand, marked the appearance in his oeuvre of distinctly intimate images, linked to the most private aspects of Sorolla’s life. These became a regular feature of his work, and following their success, the artist continued to pursue them until the end of his career.

Velázquez’s influence

Velázquez’s influence
Female Nude. Joaquín Sorolla. Oil on canvas, 106 x 186 cm. 1902. Private collection.

As with so many other artists of his day, Sorolla’s visits to the Museo del Prado, where he was able to learn directly from the great Spanish masters, had great impact on his painting. Velázquez’s influence on his work, which critics recognized from the start, in the fi rst canvases he presented to public contests in Spain, became much more evident following his international success in Paris in 1900. From that moment on, Sorolla adopted Velázquez’s models as his own, alluding to some of his most famous pieces and even copying the resources used by the Sevillian artist.

Sorolla’s provocative Female Nude—in which the artist secretly celebrated the sensual quality of his wife’s body—evokes Velázquez’s Venus at her Mirror, while his family group portraits are modelled after Las Meninas. But references to the Sevillian master’s works are not always so direct. His admiration and appropriation of the Sevillian master’s portrait models resulted in dignifi ed likenesses such as those of the Beruetes, in which Sorolla achieves a characteristic sensation of immediacy, or that of The Photographer Christian Franzen where, again mimicking Velázquez, he provides the arresting image of a shared gaze, creating a disjunction between represented space and real space.

The complete artistic freedom

The complete artistic freedom
Afternoon Sun. Joaquín Sorolla. Oil on canvas, 299 x 441 cm. 1903. New York, The Hispanic Society of America.

Sorolla’s art reached the peak of its maturity in Afternoon Sun. Here, the painter’s interest in capturing the effects of natural light, in this case in a scene featuring a fishing boat being hauled ashore after a day’s work, bathed in the setting sun of a Valencian summer evening —a theme already explored in Return from Fishing—is carried to its utmost limits. Tackled with complete artistic freedom, this visually powerful canvas allowed him to exploit the potential of the colossal dimensions of the fi gures and the imposing presence of the sail, as well as the swelling movement of the sea, captured here with frenzied energy.

Exhibited in various cities in the United States, the painting now returns to Spain for the fi rst time since it was acquired for The Hispanic Society of America of New York in 1909. When Sorolla discovered the harsh, rugged geography of Jávea and the vividly blue tonality of its transparent waters, he found the perfect setting for some of the scenes that allowed him to tackle compositions more daring than those which appear in his earlier paintings. These pieces already bear the artist’s uniquely personal and immediately recognizable mark.

The field of portraiture

The field of portraiture
Antonio García on the Beach. Joaquín Sorolla. Oil on canvas, 150 x 150 cm. 1909. Madrid, Museo Sorolla.

Following his overwhelming international success, Sorolla enjoyed an unprecedented degree of creative freedom that is reflected in all aspects of his work. In the field of portraiture, he produced wholly original prototypes, using the closest members of his family as his main models. Though key portraits such as Señora de Sorolla in Black present the artist’s elegant wife indoors, in a room of their home in Madrid, in most of his best likenesses he used a garden as the natural backdrop for his sitters. The canvas that sums up better than any other the passionate, unrestrained sense of painting in Sorolla is María Dressed as a Valencian Peasant Girl, in which he recreates the rich play of light on the young woman’s regional costume with dazzling refl ections and bold, changing colours.

At around the same time, Sorolla painted Summer, one of the most powerful beach scenes he had produced until then. In this exceptional painting, the infl uence of Greek statuary fuses with that of photography as the painter attempts to capture a snapshot of the fi gures moving on the seashore, paralyzing them in the midst of their actions.

Around 1909: the Malvarrosa beach

Around 1909: the Malvarrosa beach
The Horse’s Bath. Joaquín Sorolla. Oil on canvas, 205 x 250 cm. 1909. Madrid, Museo Sorolla.

During the summer of 1909, Sorolla moved to La Malvarrosa beach, where he felt a completely happy man. His triumph in Europe had been followed by further success in the United States, and the critical acclaim his work received was only surpassed by its warm reception on the market, which continued to demand more and more paintings by the artist.

This period of fulfi lment and self-assurance saw the artist create a series of interesting paintings, all set on the water’s edge. They are euphoric, extraordinarily luminous works that include some of the artist’s most representative pieces. In them, the Mediterranean classicism that hovers over all of Sorolla’s oeuvre achieves its fullest expression, an effect that was reinforced by the frames the artist chose for many of them, inspired by Greek architecture. In fact, an almost musical harmony, like that of a calm classical procession, informs Strolling along the Seashore, a work that validates the artist’s fame, in which the material treatment is given special prominence. Scenes such as The Horse’s Bath and Boys on the Beach became not only evocations of the Mediterranean’s Greco-Roman past, but also icons of Sorolla’s work and the expression of a joyful interpretation of reality, in contrast to the pessimism of the Generation of ’98.

Towards 1915: the return to his own artistic order

Towards 1915: the return to his own artistic order
The Pink Robe. Joaquín Sorolla. Oil on canvas, 208 x 126.5 cm. 1916. Madrid, Museo Sorolla.

Sorolla’s quest for creative freedom came to a climax in his mature work, in which he refused to be constrained by expressive limitations of any kind. Thus, while remaining faithful to the realistic definition of his art, during this stage he produced his most daring works, paintings in which the material execution of the piece took precedence over all other aspects. La siesta is the clearest example of his desire to attain artistic independence. The portrait of Louis Comfort Tiffany also belongs to this experimental line. In this work, Sorolla manipulated a background landscape of motley-hued fl owers to recreate the aesthetic of the stained glass windows responsible for making Tiffany internationally famous, attempting in this way to capture the essence of the sitter’s own art and personality.

In the final years of his life, however, Sorolla abandoned the experimental line he had pursued in works such as La siesta and, around 1915, he returned to his own artistic order. That year, during his summer painting expedition, his art adopted a forceful, monumental tone. This tone, already visible in Beached Boats, whose sails—as smooth as polished stone—are so swollen with wind that they are cut off by the edge of the canvas, culminates in the sensual, pagan presence of The Pink Robe, where the sculptural physique of a female fi gure is emphatically humanized by means of a realistic and completely modern treatment of light.

The Hispanic Society of America

The Hispanic Society of America
Castile, The Bread Festival Joaquín Sorolla, 1913. Oil on canvas. 351 x 1392 cm. Nueva York, The Hispanic Society of America.

The Hispanic Society of America was founded in 1904 by the American magnate Archer M. Huntington, who conceived it as a place for the study and preservation of Hispanic culture in New York. Its founder also left the Society his vast and rich collection of artwork and historic pieces, primarily from Spain. In 1909, Sorolla and Huntington began a fertile relationship that greatly contributed to the painter’s success in the United States; the collector also bought some of his best works. In 1910, they planned the mural which Sorolla was to paint for the Library of the Society’s new headquarters, built in 1908, which was designed to be the nucleus of the institution’s activities. Though Huntington felt that this room should be decorated with the most important episodes from Spanish and Portuguese history, Sorolla convinced his patron to let him do a monumental frieze with the different landscapes of Spain, including the characteristic types of each region.

The artist devoted all his energy to this project, almost uninterruptedly, from 1911 to 1919, leaving behind a vision of the country consistent with the one held by Huntington and other Anglo-Saxon Hispanists who, despite the process of industrialization that had already begun in Spain, still had a neo-Romantic vision of the country, focused on its more timeless aspects and the survival of past customs. Huntington was very satisfied with the result, and in 1918, when he saw the nearly-complete series of panels, he said: ‘Sorolla has taken his theory of painting to the limit, and for that alone it will endure.’

Visión de España

Visión de España
Seville, Holy Week Penitents Joaquín Sorolla, 1914. Oil on canvas. 351 x 300,5 cm, Nueva York, The Hispanic Society of America.

Despite Sorolla’s initial plans to represent all the regions of the Iberian Peninsula in an orderly fashion on the walls of the Hispanic Society Library, the subjects he portrayed and the painting trips he made to various Spanish provinces emerged gradually, according to the painter’s interest. He first painted the large panel Castile, the Bread Festival, between 1912 and 1913, which, due to its monumental dimensions and grand aspirations, took longer to complete than any other in the series. From March to April 1914 he tackled the first panel on Seville, Holy Week Penitents. In the summer of 1914 he painted Aragon, The Jota; Navarre, The Town Council of Roncal and Guipúzcoa, The Game of Skittles. That autumn he worked on another panel, Andalusia, The Round-up, his last piece of the year. He started off 1915 with two more panels depicting Andalusian themes, Seville, the Dance and Seville, the Bullfi ghters, which kept him busy until April. That same summer he painted Galicia, the Pilgrimage, followed by Catalonia, the Fish, in September. Between January and March of 1916 he worked on Valencia, Couples on Horseback. He then rested for nearly a year, until the following October, when he began Extremadura, the Market. In November of 1918 he returned to Valencia, where he painted Elche, the Palm Grove. After fi nishing that panel, in January of the following year, Sorolla went back to Andalusia to make the last painting in the series, Ayamonte, the Tuna Catch, which he completed in June of 1919.

The illness that fi rst surfaced when he was fi nishing the last panels, and which led to a stroke in 1920, prevented him from overseeing the mural’s installation in the room for which it had been painted. In 1922 the panels were sent to New York, but they were not hung in the Library of the Hispanic Society of America until 1926.

Landscape

Landscape
Looking for Shellfish Joaquín Sorolla, 1919. Oil on canvas, 64x96cm. Madrid, Colección Santander.

As with his portraits, Sorolla’s landscapes were so outstanding that they alone would have been worthy of major recognition in his day. Infl uenced by his friend Aureliano de Beruete, the leading master of the genre in Spain at the time, Sorolla always showed an interest in the realistic portrayal of the effects of light in all kinds of weather and the faithful refl ection of the natural terrain. His landscapes are often the most tangible, immediate proof of the total freedom with which he painted. Though he concentrated on views of beaches, meadows, mountains and cities, from 1901 onwards Sorolla also executed landscapes that are a product of the contemplation of a single detail, representations of a daring modernity expressed through unusual framings and a very direct and fresh pictorial language.

The artist’s efforts to portray nature en plein air, which required a great deal of physical stamina, diminished as Sorolla grew older and he became weakened by illness. His fi nal work was therefore limited to the garden of his home in Madrid, now the Museo Sorolla. Sorolla painted his last pieces between the walls of these gardens, and it was there that he laid down his brushes for the last time.

Artworks

1

The Palleter Declaring War on Napoleon

Oil on canvas, 154 x 205 cm
1884
Valencia, Diputación de Valencia, on deposit at the Palau de la Generalitat

2

Resting Bacchante

Oil on canvas, 30 x 69.5 cm
ca. 1887
Valencia, Museo de Bellas Artes de Valencia

3

Praying Saint

Oil on canvas, 78 x 61cm
1888
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

4

Valencian Dance in the Orange Grove

Oil on canvas, 60.5 x 102.5 cm
1889–90
Madrid, Villar-Mir Collection
 

5

Another Marguerite!

Oil on canvas, 129.5 x 198.1 cm
1892
Missouri, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Washington University in St Louis

6

After the Bath

Oil on canvas, 128 x 193 cm
1892
Private collection

7

Ex voto

Oil on canvas, 85 x 118 cm
1892
Private collection
 

8

Fishing Nets

Oil on canvas, 50 x 70 cm
1893
Private collection

9

The Suckling Child

Oil on canvas, 55.9 x 78.1 cm
1894
Masaveu Collection
 

10

And They Still Say Fish is Expensive!

Oil on canvas, 151.5 x 204 cm
1894
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

11

The Novelist Benito Pérez Galdós

Oil on canvas, 73 x 98 cm
1894
Cabildo de Gran Canaria, Casa Museo Pérez Galdós

12

Return from Fishing

Oil on canvas, 265 x 325 cm
1894
Paris, Musée d’Orsay

13

White Slave Trade

Oil on canvas, 166.5 x 194 cm
1895
Madrid, Museo Sorolla

14

Valencian Fishermen

Oil on canvas, 65 x 87 cm
1895
Private collection

15

Peeling Potatoes

Oil on canvas, 40 x 48 cm
1891–[1896?]
London, Gavin Gram

16

Sewing the Sail

Oil on canvas, 222 x 300 cm
1896
Venice, Fondazione Musei Civici, Galleria Internazionale d’Arte Moderna di Ca’Pesaro

17

An Investigation

Oil on canvas, 122 x 151 cm
1897
Madrid, Museo Sorolla

18

Clotilde Contemplating the Venus de Milo

Oil on canvas, 58.5 x 47.6 cm
ca. 1897–98
Valencia, Museo de Bellas Artes de Valencia
 

19

The Small Cove, Jávea

Oil on canvas, 47.5 x 97 cm
1898
Valencia, Private collection

20

Eating on the Boat

Oil on canvas, 180 x 250 cm
1898
Madrid, Museo de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando

21

Sad Inheritance

Oil on canvas, 212 x 288 cm
1899
Bancaja Collection

22

Mother

Oil on canvas, 125 x 169 cm
1895?–1900
Madrid, Museo Sorolla

23

Preparing Raisins (Transporting Grapes, Jávea)

Oil on canvas, 125 x 200 cm
1900
Oviedo, Principality of Asturias, Pedro Masaveu Collection, on deposit at the Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias

24

End of the Day, Jávea

Oil on canvas, 88 x 128 cm
1900
Private collection

25

María Clotilde

Oil on canvas, 110 x 80 cm
1900
Private collection

26

The Family

Oil on canvas, 185 x 159 cm
1901
Valencia, Museo de la Ciudad, Ayuntamiento

27

María Teresa Moret, the Wife of Beruete

Oil on canvas, 111 x 88 cm
1901
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

28

Mending Nets

Oil on canvas, 162.5 x 131 cm
1901
Mexico City, Museo Nacional de San Carlos Collection

29

Morning Sun

Oil on canvas, 81 x 128 cm
1901
Mexico, Pérez Simón Collection

30

Grey Day on Valencia Beach

Oil on canvas, 64 x 95 cm
1901
Private collection

31

After the Bath

Oil on canvas, 103 x 163 cm
1902
Private collection

32

Female Nude

Oil on canvas, 106 x 186 cm
1902
Private collection

35

Field in Asturias, San Esteban de Pravia

Oil on canvas, 66 x 95 cm
1903
United Status, Private collection

36

Sea and Rocks in San Esteban, Asturias

Oil on canvas, 67 x 96 cm
1903
Madrid, Museo Sorolla

37

Afternoon Sun

Oil on canvas, 299 x 441 cm
1903
New York, The Hispanic Society of America

38

Bulls in the Sea

Oil on canvas, 131 x 190 cm
1903
Private collection

39

The Photographer Christian Franzen

Oil on canvas, 100 x 66 cm
1903
Lorenzana Collection

40

Self-Portrait

Oil on canvas, 66 x 100.5 cm
1904
Madrid, Museo Sorolla

41

My Children

Oil on canvas, 160.5 x 230.5 cm
1904
Madrid, Museo Sorolla

42

Summer

Oil on canvas, 149 x 252 cm
1904
Havana, Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de Cuba

43

Bath Time

Oil on canvas, 84 x 119 cm
1904
Private collection

44

Midday at Valencia Beach

Oil on canvas, 64 x 97 cm
1904
Arango Collection

45

Sewing the Sail

Oil on canvas, 93 x 130 cm
1904
Masaveu Collection

46

José Echegaray

Oil on canvas, 100 x 133 cm
1905
Madrid, Banco de España

47

The Family of Rafael Errázuriz

Oil on canvas, 226 x 333 cm
1905
Masaveu Collection

48

The White Boat, Jávea

Oil on canvas, 105 x 150 cm
1905
Private collection

49

Clotilde and Elena on the Rocks, Jávea

Oil on canvas, 89.7 x 126.5 cm
1905
Private collection

50

Rocks and White boat, Jávea

Oil on canvas, 62.8 x 84.7 cm
1905
Madrid, Carmen Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, on deposit at the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza

51

My Children’s Grandparents

Oil on canvas, 142 x 182.5 cm
1905
Valencia, Museo de Bellas Artes de Valencia

52

Lucrecia Arana and her Son

Oil on canvas, 126.7 x 92 cm
1906
Private collection

53

Señora de Sorolla (Clotilde García del Castillo) in Black

Oil on canvas, 186.7 x 118.7 cm
1906
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Catharine Lorillard Wolfe Collection, Wolfe Fund, 1909

55

Santiago Ramón y Cajal

Oil on canvas, 107 x 144.5 cm
1906
Saragossa, Museo de Zaragoza

56

María Dressed as a Valencian Peasant Girl

Oil on canvas, 189 x 95 cm
1906
Private collection

57

The Painter Raimundo de Madrazo

Oil on canvas, 97.5 x 114.2 cm
1906
New York, The Hispanic Society of America

58

Lighthouse Walk at Biarritz

Oil on canvas, 68.3 x 188.6 cm
1906
Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, Peter Chardon Brooks Memorial Collection, Gift of Mrs Richard M. Saltonstall

59

The Blind Man of Toledo

Oil on canvas, 62 x 93 cm
1906
Dallas, Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University, Museum Purchase; Meadows Foundation Fund with private donations

60

The Shadow of Alcántara Bridge, Toledo

Oil on canvas, 66 x 93 cm
1906
Private collection

61

My Daughter’s Convalescence (María in El Pardo)

Oil on canvas, 74 x 115 cm
1907
Private collection

62

María at La Granja

Oil on canvas, 170.5 x 85.1 cm
1907
San Diego, San Diego Museum of Art, gift of Mr Archer M. Huntington in memory of his mother, Arabella D. Huntington

63

Clotilde Strolling in the Gardens of La Granja

Oil on canvas, 170 x 100 cm
1907
Havana, Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de Cuba

64

Leonese Peasants

Oil on canvas, 198.6 x 253.6 cm
1907
New York, The Hispanic Society of America

65

Reflections in a Fountain

Oil on canvas, 58.5 x 99 cm
1908
Madrid, Fundación Museo Sorolla

66

At the Bath, Valencia

Oil on canvas, 200 x 150 cm
1908
Private collection

67

Sea Idyll

Oil on canvas, 151 x 199 cm
1908
New York, The Hispanic Society of America

68

After the Bath

Oil on canvas, 176 x 111.5 cm
1908
New York, The Hispanic Society of America

69

Valencian Boats

Oil on canvas, 52 x 85.5 cm
1908
Private collection

70

The Photographer Antonio García in his Laboratory

Oil on canvas, 91 x 111.5 cm
1908
New York, The Hispanic Society of America

71

The Horse’s Bath

Oil on canvas, 205 x 250 cm
1909
Madrid, Museo Sorolla

72

Antonio García on the Beach

Oil on canvas, 150 x 150 cm

1909

Madrid, Museo Sorolla

73

Strolling Along the Seashore

Oil on canvas, 205 x 200 cm

1909

Madrid, Fundación Museo Sorolla

74

The Young Yachtsman

Oil on canvas, 100 x 110 cm

1909

Madrid, Museo Sorolla

76

Reservoir, Alcázar of Seville

Oil on canvas, 82.5 x 105.5 cm

1910

Madrid, Museo Sorolla

77

Afternoon Sun at the Alcázar of Seville

Oil on canvas, 94 x 64 cm

1910

Private collection

78

José Echegaray

Oil on canvas, 114.2 x 109.1 cm

1910

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

79

Under the Awning, Zarauz

Oil on canvas, 99.1 x 114.3 cm

1910

St Louis, Saint Louis Art Museum
 

80

Louis Comfort Tiffany

Oil on canvas, 150.5 x 225.5 cm

1911

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

81

The Nap

Oil on canvas, 200 x 201 cm

1911

Madrid, Museo Sorolla

82

Castile, The Bread Festival

Oil on canvas, 351 x 1392 cm

1913

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

83

Seville, Holy Week Penitents

Oil on canvas, 351 x 300.5 cm

1914

New York, The Hispanic Society of America
 

84

Aragon, The Jota

Oil on canvas, 351 x 301 cm

1914

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

85

Navarre, The Town Council of Roncal

Oil on canvas, 349 x 230 cm

1914

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

86

Guipúzcoa, The Game of Skittles

Oil on canvas, 350 x 231.5 cm

1914

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

87

Andalusia, The Round-Up

Oil on canvas, 351 x 752 cm

1914

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

88

Seville, The Dance

Oil on canvas, 351 x 302.5 cm

1915

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

89

Seville, The Bullfighters

Oil on canvas, 350 x 231 cm

1915

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

90

Galicia, The Pilgrimage

Oil on canvas, 351 x 300 cm

1915

New York, The Hispanic Society of America
 

91

Catalonia, The Fish

Oil on canvas, 351 x 485 cm

1915

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

92

Valencia, Couples on Horseback

Oil on canvas, 351 x 301 cm

1916

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

93

Extremadura, The Market

Oil on canvas, 351 x 302 cm

1917

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

94

Elche, The Palm Grove

Oil on canvas, 350 x 321 cm

1918–19

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

95

Ayamonte, The Tuna Catch

Oil on canvas, 349 x 485 cm

1919

New York, The Hispanic Society of America

96

Beached Boats

Oil on canvas, 100 x 120 cm

1915

Private collection

97

The Pink Robe

Oil on canvas, 208 x 126,5 cm

1916

Madrid, Museo Sorolla

98

Sierra Nevada, Granada

Oil on canvas, 65 x 95 cm

1917

Private collection

99

Looking for Shellfish

Oil on canvas, 64 x 96 cm

1919

Madrid, Santander Collection

100

The Smugglers

Oil on canvas, 84 x 167 cm

1919

Private collection

101

Garden of the Sorolla House

Oil on canvas, 105 x 87.5 cm

1920

Madrid, Museo Sorolla

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