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Bramer, Leonaert
Delft, 1596 - Delft, 1674
Bramer, Leonaert
Delft, 1596 - Delft, 1674

The son of Hendrick Bramer and Christynge Jans, nothing is known about his training. The first documented biographical fact is the journey he started through France and Italy in 1614. He resided in Arras and Amiens in 1614 and in Aix-en-Provence in 1616 on his way to Rome, where he lived between 1619 and 1627 (although not continuously). Cornelis de Bie states that he spent time in Venice, Florenc

Vroom, Hendrick Cornelisz
Haarlem, H. 1566 - Haarlem, 1640
Vroom, Hendrick Cornelisz
Haarlem, H. 1566 - Haarlem, 1640

Considered the pioneer of Dutch seascape painting, he received his training in Delft, where his mother’s family lived. According to Van Mander, his stepfather, a ceramic painter like Vroom’s father, wanted him to follow the same career path. Consequently, Hendrick Cornelisz fled and embarked to Spain. From there, he went to Italy, where he worked for various ecclesiastical patrons in Florence and

Camprobín, Pedro de
Almagro, Ciudad Real, 1605 - Sevilla, 1674
Camprobín, Pedro de
Almagro, Ciudad Real, 1605 - Sevilla, 1674

He is known to have signed an apprenticeship contract with well-known painter Luis Tristán in Toledo when he was fourteen years old (1619). That explains his strong tenebrist approach, which decidedly contrasts with what could be presumed to have been his education as a child, given that his mother, Juana Passano, was related to the wives of the Peroli brothers, Juan Bautista and Esteban, Genoese

Wouwerman, Philips
Haarlem, 1619 - Haarlem, 1668
Wouwerman, Philips
Haarlem, 1619 - Haarlem, 1668

It is thought that he began his training at the workshop of his father, the history painter Paulus Joostenz. Wouwerman (+1642), by whom no work has been identified to date. According to Cornelis de Bie, he received training in Frans Hals’s workshop, but his painting does not reveal any connection to Hals’s. According to information provided by his student Matthias Scheits (around 1625/30–1700), in

Velázquez, Diego Rodríguez de Silva y
Sevilla (Spain), 1599 - Madrid (Spain), 1660
Velázquez, Diego Rodríguez de Silva y
Sevilla (Spain), 1599 - Madrid (Spain), 1660

Born in Seville, Velázquez adopted his mothers surname, as was common in Andalusia, signing “Diego Velázquez” or “Diego de Silva Velázquez". He studied painting and worked professionally in his native city until he was twenty-four, then moved with his family to Madrid. There, he entered the king’s service, remaining until his death in 1660. Much of his work was painted for the royal collection and

Snyders, Frans
Antwerp, 1579 - Antwerp, 1657
Snyders, Frans
Antwerp, 1579 - Antwerp, 1657

Snyders is one of the 17th-century Flemish painters of highest repute, both for his still lifes and for his hunting scenes, and was very well known and appreciated, particularly in Spain. Considering that one of the major specialities of the Flemish schools is animal paintings, its artists were truly geniuses at inventing the most varied hunting scenes and compositions in which beasts played a pre

Passignano
Passignano, 1559 - Florence, 1638
Passignano
Passignano, 1559 - Florence, 1638

He studied in Florence under Girolamo Macchietti (1535-1592) and Giovanni Battista Naldini (c. 1537-1591), but his principal master was Federico Zuccaro (1540/41-1609), whit whom he worked from 1575 to 1579 on the fresco decoration of the cupola of Florence Cathedral, left incomplete at Vasari’s death. Following periods of activity in Rome (1580-1582) and Venice (1582-1588), Passignano returned to

Loarte, Alejandro de
Madrid? (Sapain), 1590/1600 - Toledo (Spain), 1626
Loarte, Alejandro de
Madrid? (Sapain), 1590/1600 - Toledo (Spain), 1626

A Spanish painter from Madrid whose father, Jerónimo de Loarte was also a painter and probably Alejandro's first teacher. Little is known abut this artist as he is not mentioned by his contemporaries. Despite his great promise, he must have died while still a youth, as none of his known works dates from before 1622 and his death occurred in 1626, while his father was still alive. We know he marrie

La Tour, Georges de
Vic-sur-Seille, 1593 - Luneville, 30/01/1652
La Tour, Georges de
Vic-sur-Seille, 1593 - Luneville, 30/01/1652

The artist was born in a small town in the Duchy of Lorraine, an independent territory in the Germanic Holy Roman Empire, a century and a half before it became part of France. A baker's son, he is documented for the first time in 1616. In 1617 he married the daughter of Jean Le Nerf, silversmith to the reigning duke. One of his sons was Etienne de La Tour, also a painter, who assisted him in the f

Hamen y León, Juan van der
Madrid, 1596 - Madrid, 1631
Hamen y León, Juan van der
Madrid, 1596 - Madrid, 1631

Despite his early death, considerable documentation of his life still exists today. We know he was born to a Flemish family and, like his father, he was a member of the Guardia de Arqueros, a corps dedicated to the protection of the king of Spain whose members were all from the Netherlands. In 1615, he married Eugenia Herrera, whose family was known for its sculptors and painters. By then, he was

Guercino (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri)
Cento, Ferrara (Italy), 1591 - Bologna (Italy), 1666
Guercino (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri)
Cento, Ferrara (Italy), 1591 - Bologna (Italy), 1666

Born in a town halfway between Ferrara and Bologna, Barbieri soon received the nickname "Il Guercino" owing to his squint ("quercio" in Italian means cross-eyed). He was chiefly self taught in a particularly rich artistic environment: by studying the altar paintings of Ludovico Carracci, which he was able to see in Cento or Bologna, he introduced a vehement dynamism and fluidity of execution into

Cesi, Bartolomeo
Bologna, 1556 - Bologna, 1629
Cesi, Bartolomeo
Bologna, 1556 - Bologna, 1629

Cesi was born into a wealthy family and received a humanist education before he studied painting. Little is known of his training, which was probably under Giovanni Francesco Bezzi (c. 1500-1571), and the first commission that is securely attributable to him were the frescoes depicting the Life of the Virgin (1574) in the Vezzi Chapel in S. Stefano, Bologna. Around the same time he also assisted P

Carracci, Annibale
Bologna, 1560 - Rome, 1609
Carracci, Annibale
Bologna, 1560 - Rome, 1609

Annibale was probably trained by his elder cousin, Ludovico Carracci (1555-1619), as well as by Bartolomeo Passarotti (1529-1592). In 1582, he and other family members established an academy for the study of art, later known as the Accademia degli Incamminati, which was fundamental to the subsequent development of Bolognese painting in the seventeenth century. Among his earliest works are a number

Calvaert, Denys
Antwerp, H.1540 - Bologna, 1619
Calvaert, Denys
Antwerp, H.1540 - Bologna, 1619

Flemish painter and draftsman, he was for long active in Italy. In 1556-1557, he is recorded in Antwerp as the pupil of the landscape painter Kerstiaen van Queboom (1515-1578). He arrived in Bologna in c. 1560, where he was to remain for the remainder of his career, except for a period in Rome in 1572-1575. On his arrival in Bologna, he entered the workshop of Prospero Fontana (1512-1597), leaving

Cajés, Eugenio
Madrid, 1574 - Madrid (Spain), 1634
Cajés, Eugenio
Madrid, 1574 - Madrid (Spain), 1634

He was a disciple of his father, Italian painter Patricio Cajés, who had moved to Madrid to work on the monastery of El Escorial. He is thought to have spent time in Rome around 1595, where he would have taken part in the birth of Caravaggio's naturalism, and he must have returned to Spain with a fondness for Tempesta's battle compositions, which Vicente Carducho's generation knew through prints a

Brueghel el Joven, Pieter
Brussels (Belgium), 1564/65 - Antwerp (Belgium), 1637/38
Brueghel el Joven, Pieter
Brussels (Belgium), 1564/65 - Antwerp (Belgium), 1637/38

Born to a family of extraordinary painters, he was the son of Pieter Brueghel the Elder and the brother of Jan Brueghel de Velours. Both he and Jan were trained by their father, and learned watercolor painting from their grandmother, Mayken Verhulst. Pieter also studied with landscape painter Gillis van Coninxloo and became a master in 1588. Perhaps the most outstanding of his numerous apprentices

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