The itinerary <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> has been successfully created. Now you can add in works from the Collection browser
<em>TITULOOBRA</em> added to <em>TITULORECORRIDO</em> itinerary

Collection <Back

Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti

Venice, 1518/19 - Venice, 1594

In his biography of Tintoretto Carlo Ridolfi recounts the painter’s fleeting stay at Titian’s studio. But despite the unquestionable authority of this narrative, Tintoretto’s early works bear little resemblance to those of that artist from Pieve di Cadore. His paintings from the late 1530s—The Holy Family with Saint Jerome, the portrait of attorney Girolamo Marcello (private collection, Lucerne), and Jesus among the Elders (Museo del Duomo, Milan)—or the early 1540s—Apollo and Marsias or Mercury and Argos (both at the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford), as well as Bible Stories (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna)—reveal a familiarity with Il Pordenone and Bonifacio Vernonese. He also characterizes Andrea Schiavone’s figures and reflects the sculptural models of Jacopo Sansovino. Besides these elements, young Tintoretto drew on newer practices by the Roman mannerists (Francesco Salviati, Giuseppe Porta and Giorgio Vasari) that he had discovered while in Venice and on a trip to Mantua in 1540. The first indications of his personal approach to painting appear in works commissioned for the church of San Marcuola—The Last Supper and Christ Washing the Feet of the Apostles (Museo del Prado)—where his peculiar arrangement of the figures, his sense of space and his extraordinary mastery of perspective begin to emerge. In 1548, The Miracle of the Slave (Galleria dell’Accademia, Venice) powerfully marked him as one of 16th-century Venice’s great masters, with a new approach that made theatricality an attribute of painting itself: ground-breaking work capable of a dynamic play of aerial perspective that no one before him had ever dared to put on canvas. The years immediately following that painting were marked by both public and private commissions that bore witness to his striking success among Venetians. In 1549, he painted Saint Roch among the Plague Victims (Chiesa di San Rocco, Venice), and between 1550 and 1553 he painted Saint John in Patmos (National Gallery of Art, Washington) and Susanna and the Elders (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna), both for the Scuola della Trinità. In this group of works, he strengthened his style through the use of his own unmistakable resources. In the late 1550s, Tintoretto developed a new approach to light in works such as the doors of the organ at the church of Santa Maria del Giglio, and this culminated in paintings such as The Miracle of Saint Mark (Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan), where light determines the forms, volumes, masses and space of both the architecture and the figures themselves. In 1564, Tintoretto began the first phase of the decoration of the Scuola de San Rocco, which can undoubtedly be considered his largest project. This activity, which also included his workshop, ended in 1587, and some of the paintings it involved forcefully convey a mystical view of their respective Bible episode. In The Vision of Saint Mary of Egypt or Christ Before Pilate (Scuola de San Rocco, Venice), for example, the symbiosis of paint, light and the human figure reaches the absolute zenith of spirituality. During those years, he also painted works for the Ducal Palace, which celebrate Venice’s glory in different way. Outstanding among these works are a series of allegories, including The Three Graces a depiction of Mercury, Ariadne, Venus and Bacchus, and Vulcan’s Forge (1577-1578), as well as denser depictions of historical episodes such as The Taking of Zara and The Battle of Salvore (Palazzo Ducale, Venice). For that same palace, Tintoretto drew on his workshop, and especially his son, Domenico, to make the controversial Paradise for the Council’s main hall. Christ at Martha and Marie’s House (Alte Pinakothek, Munich) is close to the best style of his works for the Ducal Palace, while Christ at the Sea of Galilee (National Gallery of Art, Washington) shows an interest in light that recalls his paintings for the Scuola de San Rocco. Toward the end of the 1570s, Tintoretto was commissioned to paint the Fasti Gonzagheschi (Alte Pinakothek, Munich), a series of canvases to celebrate the great deeds of that important Italian family. The last painting in this series depicts Philip II’s triumphal entry into Mantua but, curiously, despite this direct reference to the Spanish monarchy, Tintoretto received few commissions from foreigners, who generally preferred the work of Titian. It was not until the end of the 16th century that Tintoretto’s growth led him to levels of excellence confirmed, in the Siglo de Oro, by Velázquez’s interest in his painting and the progressive acquisition of his work by the Spanish aristocracy’s leading collectors. Among the works they acquired are numerous portraits, as well as Christ Washing the Feet of the Apostles, mentioned above, The Abduction of Helen and the Bible Stories Series, all of which are now at the Museo del Prado. Tintoretto’s two final works, painted the year he died (1594), were The Miracle of Manna and The Last Supper, for the church of San Giorgio Maggiore. A few years earlier, in 1587, he completed his famous frontal Self Portrait (Musée du Louvre, Paris), which combines stylistic characteristics shared by all his portraits and thus marks his development in that genre from beginning to end (Mancini, M. in Enciclopedia M.N.P., 2006, vol. VI, pp. 2077-2079).

Artworks (26)

La violencia de Tarquino
Oil on canvas, XVI century
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti (Workshop of)
Un magistrado veneciano
Oil on canvas, XVI century
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
Un patricio veneciano
Oil on canvas, XVI century
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
Pedro de Medici (¿?)
Oil on canvas, XVI century
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti (Attributed to)
Retrato de caballero
Oil on canvas, XVI century
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
Un senador o secretario veneciano
Oil on canvas, XVI century
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
Un jesuita
Oil on canvas, XVI century
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti
Retrato de señora joven
Oil on canvas, XVI century
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti (Attributed to)
The Washing of the Feet
Oil on canvas, 1548 - 1549
Tintoretto, Jacopo Robusti

Prado Shop

Print on demand

Print artworks available in our catalogue in high quality and your preferred size and finish.

Image archive

Request artworks available in our catalogue in digital format.

Up