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Ingres

Museo Nacional del Prado. Madrid 11/24/2015 - 3/27/2016

The work of Ingres, only seemingly rooted in Academic painting, undoubtedly constitutes an important forerunner of the late 19th- and early 20th-century artistic revolutions. The heir to Raphael and Poussin, Ingres’ work anticipates both Picasso and anatomical distortion in art, inspiring the revitalisation of the 19th-century European art schools, particularly the Spanish.

The exhibition to be shown at the Museo del Prado in 2015, which has benefitted from the special collaboration of the Musée du Louvre, offers a precise chronological presentation of Ingres’ work but will also pay particular attention to his complex relationship with portraiture (characterised byhis simultaneous rejection and admiration for it), which will be juxtaposed with his ongoing aim of being primarily recognised as a history painter.

Supported by:
Fundación AXA

Multimedia

Exhibition

A multi-faceted training

A multi-faceted training
The Forestier Family
Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres
Graphite on paper, 233 x 309 mm
1806
Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques: Collection Coutan
Don Hauguet, Schubert et Milliet, 1883

According to one of Ingres’ closest followers: “He was already skilled in the handling of the brush when David took on the task of teaching him.” Although it has frequently been said that Ingres only studied with David, the reality is more complex. His father, a painter of provincial fame but enormous ambition, had already initiated him in the fundamentals of the technique – by the age of ten Ingres could paint and draw like a professional – and was planning his future. He thus accompanied his son to Toulouse where, at the height of the Revolutionary period, the local Academy furthered the abilities Ingres had possessed since childhood. There he acquired a solid training with a focus on antiquity, revealing a precocious and refined sensitivity in which the art of Raphael was preeminent. Having graduated in 1797, his arrival in Paris that same year revealed the extent of his ambitions. He enrolled as a pupil of David and as a student at the École des Beaux-Arts, where he studied “with more persistence and perseverance than most of his fellow pupils” in order to avoid “all the seething madness taking place around him.” He also made use of the short-lived Musée Napoléon, which housed the finest paintings looted from countries occupied by the French during the Napoleonic period, and took part in the aesthetic debates in his master’s atelier. Ingres’ goal was, however, the Grand Prix de Rome, the highest recognition that France awarded its young artists.

Informal portraits. Early official portraits

Informal portraits. Early official portraits
François-Marius Granet
Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
Oil on canvas, 72 x 61 cm
1807
Aix-en-Provence, Musée Granet
inv. 849.1.31

Ingres was a successful portraitist against his own volition. From the outset of his career he accepted commissions for portraits, although claiming to do so reluctantly: “He’s always the same. He always wants to do everything and he always complains about what he’s accepted when he gets down to painting it”, as one of his closest confidants ironically observed. The need to conform to the established hierarchy of the pictorial genres meant that Ingres attempted to postpone his activities as a commissioned portraitist in order to achieve the desired prestige as a history painter. Nonetheless, from his first efforts in Paris, the genre revealed itself as one of the pillars of his art and as the ideal vehicle for presenting his aesthetic ideas. While waiting to receive the prize money for the Grand Prix de Rome of 1801 (which did not arrive until 1806), Ingres needed to both make a living and further his reputation in society. He thus started to become known as a portraitist, albeit of a somewhat controversial nature. His portraits of this period reflect the voluptuousness of Italian models, the colouring of Flemish art and subtle Gothicising influences which reveal his complete assimilation of models derived from the tradition of painting represented in Napoléon’s Louvre. These portraits are also the best indication of the independent course that his art would take during his years in Rome.

Rome and the myths of art

Rome and the myths of art
The Dream of Ossian
Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
Oil on canvas, 348 x 275 cm
1813 (retouched by Raymond Balze in 1835)
Montauban, Musée Ingres
M.I.867.70

Ingres arrived in Rome as a grant student in 1806. He remained to some extent aloof from the intense atmosphere of collaboration characteristic of the lives of the majority of artists there, preferring to concentrate on his own pictorial investigations. Paradoxically, this deliberate isolation resulted in a more open approach but above all in a rigorous focus on his artistic ideals, defined by his study of the classical tradition and by his passionate admiration for Raphael.

The end of his study grant in 1810 coincided with the establishment of Rome as the second capital of the French empire, allowing Ingres to prolong his stay in order to work for Napoleon and the senior government officials who required his services, before leaving for Florence in 1820. The refined tastes of these clients offered Ingres a unique opportunity to experiment with new aesthetic approaches in his ongoing quest for classical Roman monumentality.

The classical challenge

The classical challenge
Virgil reading the Aeneidto Augustus, Octavia and Livia, or“Tu Marcellus eris” [fragment].
Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
Oil on canvas, 138 x 142 cm.
1819
Brussel, Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, inv.1836.

Giving form to the classical tradition was one of the ongoing features of Ingres’ output. In this sense, his interest in Greco-Latin literature played a key role as it allowed him to combine the classicising intent of his aesthetic with the eternal nature of the great themes of antiquity.

In Rome, Ingres painted a composition on Virgil that depicts the culminating moment of the Latin poet’s fame: the moment when he read out his masterpiece, the Aeneid, before the Emperor. The painting was displayed as a pair in the Villa Aldobrandini, the residence of the Napoleonic governor in Rome, with a Coronation of Homer (now lost) by the Spanish artist José Aparicio.

Having returned to Paris, in 1826 Ingres devised a composition for the ceiling of one of the new galleries in the Musée du Louvre. Depicting his own version of The Coronation of Homer, it marks the fulfilment of his desire to root his aesthetic in literary idealism. His depiction of Homer, crowned in the presence of the great myths of classically derived western culture, offers the defining image of classicism.

"Troubadour"

During his time in Italy and while devising his large-format classical compositions, Ingres also produced small commissioned paintings on themes from the new “troubadour” genre. To the horror of the Academy – rooted in the ideals of classical antiquity expressed through exemplary episodes depicted in large-format canvases – these small paintings depicted stories of greater emotional than historical interest, set in the European courts of the Middle Ages or the early modern age. Executed with a technique and palette close to Dutch painting, they expressed a certain degree of melancholic nostalgia for the past characteristic of the taste of the French Restoration of 1814.

Ingres, who assimilated the “troubadour” genre, received commissions to paint anecdotal historical episodes. Going beyond this, however, in a personal exercise of introspection, he also depicted scenes from the lives of the artists whom he most admired, particularly Raphael. Based on literary accounts or on Vasari’s Lives, he frequently repeated these subjects. He also painted episodes of epic emotional intensity taken directly from the great classics of Italian literature such as Dante’s Divine Comedy.

Ingres and the 14th Duke of Alba

Ingres and the 14th Duke of Alba
Self-portrait, half-length
Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres
Graphite on paper, 299 x 219 mm
1835
Paris, Musée du Louvre

At a very early date and before he became a celebrated artist, Ingres benefited from the support of a Spanish patron, Carlos Miguel Fitz-James Stuart (1794-1835), 7th Duke of Berwick, who succeeded his cousin (Goya’s famous Duchess of Alba) to the Alba title. With the aim of adding greater lustre to his dynasty, the Duke assembled a remarkable art collection ranging from Roman statuary and classical ceramics to commissions from living artists for painting and sculpture.

Ingres worked for the Duke after the Napoleonic court left Rome, receiving numerous commissions from him, of which he only completed one: Philip V awarding the Golden Fleece to the Duke of Berwick (Madrid, Fundación Casa de Alba). In contrast to his small history paintings, this canvas depicts an important historical event: the moment when Philip V decorated the Duke of Berwick for his military prowess in defending the Bourbon claim against the Austrian empire in the context of the War of the Spanish Succession. Ingres always prized this canvas, presenting it as one of his works of most academic merit when he entered the Institut de France.

Captive women

Captive women
Grande Odalisque
Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres
Oil on canvas, 91 x 162 cm
1814
Paris, Musée du Louvre, Départment des Peintures, Acquis en 1899

In contrast to his heroic, martial treatment of the male nude, which he had learned from David, Ingres’ approach to the genre of the female nude was entirely based on the erotic charge inherent in the beauty of the female body and he paid no heed to the aesthetic canons of the academic nude. His Odalisque, devoid of any moral argument and not associated with either history or mythology, became famous as a direct invitation to sensual pleasure. As such, it is considered the first great nude in the modern tradition.

Combining eroticism with a certain element of terror, on occasions Ingres located his female nudes in dangerous, hostile environments. Ruggiero rescuing Angelica depicts a recognisable literary fantasy and one that was appreciated by the public of the day.

Bound with chains or captive in a harem, Ingres’ ideal women, appealingly contorted in their leisurely abandonment to a pleasure outside everyday reality, have been seen as the complete but also the complementary antithesis of the moral virtue which masculinity was considered to embody.

New portraits

New portraits
Louis-François Bertin
Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
Oil on canvas, 116 x 95 cm
1832
Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des peintures, acquis des descendants du modèle, en 1897, RF 1071

Aware that history painting would never satisfy the ambitions that he had conceded to it, after his return from Italy Ingres reconsidered his literary and erotic canvases, and in particular his portraits. The latter allowed him to make innovations in a fashionable genre, although he never ultimately accepted the idea of himself as a portraitist.

Together with the portrait of the minister Louis-Mathieu Molé (Paris, Louvre), those of Monsieur Bertin and Ferdinand-Philippe d’Orléans were the key works in Ingres’ rise to fame as the portraitist of Parisian elite society. Both the public and critics closely followed the appearance of new portraits by the painter who immortalised the key figures of French society.

While in his portraits of male sitters the artist concentrated on a psychological description of the sitter, using simple, restrained settings, in his seemingly less introspective female ones he paid great attention to details of dress and fashion. For the modern viewer, however, both correspond to the Baudelarian idea of the “true portrait” as an “ideal reconstruction of individuals”.

Religious painting

Religious painting
Virgin Adoring the Host
Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres
Oil on canvas, 113 cm diam
1854
Paris, Musée du Louvre (Depôt aux Musées d'Orsay et de l'Orangerie)

While for European art critics of the time, religious painting was the preserve of the Nazarenes, led by Johann Friedrich Overbeck (1789-1869), Ingres offered a convincing alternative to that German artist’s Christian painting, making use of it to establish his more solid prestige as a history painter. For an artist who invented the “religion of art” and who venerated Raphael as the first apostle of formal beauty, finding his place in this narrow artistic field was not an easy endeavour. Nonetheless, his ongoing interest in religious subjects, evident throughout most of his career, led him to produce monumental compositions with historical settings, either involving an epic treatment, as in The Martyrdom of Saint Symphorian (Autún, cathedral), or a more iconic one, such as The Vow of Louis XIII (Montauban, cathedral).

In addition, Ingres’ small-format devotional works, the majority depicting the Virgin Mary, enjoyed enormous success with his clients, with critics and with an ever growing public that demanded reproductions of them in the form of prints.

Sumptuous nudity

Sumptuous nudity
The Turkish Bath
Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
Oil on canvas laid down to panel, 108 cm diam
1862
Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Peintures, Don de la Societé des Amis du Louvre, avec le concours de Maurice Fenaille, 1911, RF 1934.

For his celebrated Turkish Bath, Ingres based himself on passages from an 18th-century account by Lady Mary Montagu, wife of an English ambassador, following her visit to a Turkish bath in which she described how the women bathed in preparation for the wedding of one of them. Ingres reproduced the warm, aqueous sensuality of a scene forbidden to male eyes. Completed when the artist was eighty-two, the painting’s execution must have given him numerous sleepless nights as it is known that he worked on it for years, drawing and studying the theme in order to adapt it to his own aesthetic. He first painted it in a rectangular format but the subject’s erotic charge convinced him to transform it into a tondo. This revised format, with its circular shape that functions to emphasise the musical sinuosity of the women’s opulent curves, also encourages a more private gaze.

The culmination of erotic idealisation of the female body in which the abundant curves, arranged in a fragmented manner, reflect an accumulated sexual charge, Ingres’ work is among the most authentic of his entire oeuvre, while it also reveals his love of variations and repetitions of the same subject.

Late portraits

Late portraits
The Countess of Haussonville
Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
Oil on canvas, 132 x 92 cm 
1845
New York, The Frick Collection, 1927

From the outset of his career Ingres venerated the female universe. A voyeuristic spectator of the erotic spectacle of idealised women, he also created the most sophisticated image of society’s most respected ladies. As an artist exceptionally alert to the novelties of the emerging fashion industry, Ingres discussed and decided the smallest adjustments and details with his female sitters. His privileged position, however, allowed him to go much further, as Baudelaire noted: “Monsieur Ingres, it has to be admitted, selects with wonderful perceptiveness the models best suited to bring out his talents. Beautiful women, amply endowed, bursting with serene and flourishing health, these are his triumph and his joy!”.

Ingres, who had endured criticism of his excessive idealism throughout his entire career, now seems to take his revenge with his realistic presentation of the most mundane details and his precise descriptions of the tactile qualities of the materials of his sitters’ clothes, their flesh and hair, resulting in an unprecedented display of artistic virtuosity. Overall, Ingres’ female portraits offer the viewer the pleasure of refined forms and intense colours, provoking a sensual pleasure that consciously competed with the emerging art of photography.

Artworks

1

Portrait of Ingres as a Young Man

Madame Gustave Héquet according to Ingres

Oil on canvas, 86.4 x 69.9 cm

1850-60

New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Bequest of Grace Rainey Rogers, 1943; 43.85.1

2

Antiochus and Stratonice

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite and brown and grey wash on paper, 250 x 400 mm

1806

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques: Collection Coutan. Don Hauguet, Schubert et Milliet, 1883

3

Torso of a Man

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 99 x 88 cm

ca. 1799

Montauban, Musée Ingres, M.I.D. 851.1

4

Study of a Male Nude

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 78 x 56 cm

1801

Montauban, Musée Ingres, MI.875.2.2

5

Antiochus Sending Scipio’s Son back

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Lead pencil and wash on paper, 24.2 x 37.3 cm

1800

Paris, Private Collection

6

Achilles Receiving the Ambassadors of Agamemnon

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 110 x 155 cm

1801

Paris, École Nationale des Beaux-Arts, PRP 40

7

Study of a Male Nude Walking to the Left

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite and wash with white highlights on paper, 222 x 350 mm

1811

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques, legs Gatteaux, 1881

8

Jean-François Gilibert

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 99 x 81 cm

1804

Montauban, Musée Ingres, MI.37.2

9

Napoléon Bonaparte as First Consul

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 227 x 147 cm

1804

Liège, Musée des Beaux-Arts (BAL), AM 873/1

François-Marius Granet
10

François-Marius Granet

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 72 x 61 cm

1807

Aix-en-Provence, Musée Granet, inv.849.1.31

11

Madame Aymon, called La Belle Zélie

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 59 x 49 cm

1806

Rouen, Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Rouen, 870.1.1

12

Portrait of a young Man, known as “Talma’s Nephew”

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 46 x 37 cm

1805

Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des peintures, Donation de la baronne Eva Gebhard-Gourgaud, 1965

Madame Rivière
13

Madame Rivière

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 116.5 x 81.7 cm

1805

Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des peintures, legs Mme Paul Rivière, née Sophie Robillard, belle-fille du modèle, 1870

14

Portrait of Jacques Marquet, Baron de Montbreton de Norvins

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas laid down onto panel, 97.2 x 78.7 cm

1811

London, The National Gallery, NG 3291

Napoleon I on his Imperial Throne
15

Napoleon I on his Imperial Throne

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 260 x 163 cm

1806

Paris, Depôt du Musée du Louvre au musée de l’Armée, 1832, inv. 5420

16

Edme Bochet

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 94 x 69 cm

1811

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Peintures, legado del retratado, 1878

17

The Misses Harvey

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Grey-brown ink on paper, 257 x 180 mm

1804

Paris, Musée du Louvre, RF 12293 recto

Self-portrait, half-length
18

Self-portrait, half-length

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite on paper, 299 x 219 mm

1835

Paris, Musée du Louvre, RF 9 recto

19

The Marchioness of Ariza and her Daughter

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Black chalk or graphite on paper, 355 x 252 mm

ca. 1818-19

Florence, Gabinetto dei Disegni e Stampe degli Uffizi, inv. 118568

The Forestier Family
20

The Forestier Family

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite on paper, 233 x 309 mm

1806

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques: Collection Coutan. Don Hauguet, Schubert et Milliet, 1883

21

Niccolò Paganini

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite on paper, 298 x 218 mm

1819

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques, RF4381

22

Madame Destouches

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite on paper, 430 x 285 mm

1816

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques, legs Destouches, 1891, RF 1747 Recto

23

Charlotte-Madeleine Taurel

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite on paper, 169 x 128 mm

ca. 1825

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques, legs R. Galichon, 1918, RF 4624

24

Oedipus answers the Riddle of the Sphinx

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 189 x 144 cm

1808

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Peintures, Legs comtesse Duchâtel, 1878

The Dream of Ossian
25

The Dream of Ossian

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 348 x 275 cm

1813 (retouched by Raymond Balze in 1835)

Montauban, Musée Ingres, M.I.867.70

26

The Dream of Ossian

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Pen and grey-brown ink with coloured wash, squared up in pencil, 227 x 236 mm

1813

Paris, Private Collection

27

Study of feet for the Apotheosis of Homer

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on paper mounted on canvas, 17.1 x 22.4 cm

1826-27

Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des peintures, RF 3773

28

Nude studies for The Apotheosis of Homer

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Charcoal and graphite on paper, 462 x 355 mm

1826-27

Montauban, Musée Ingres, MI. 867.886

Virgil reading the Aeneid to Augustus, Octavia and Livia, or “Tu Marcellus eris” [fragment]
29

Virgil reading the Aeneid to Augustus, Octavia and Livia, or “Tu Marcellus eris” [fragment]

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 138 x 142 cm

1819

Brussels, Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, inv.1836

30

Antiochus and Stratonice

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite, coloured wash, oil and varnish on paper laid down onto canvas, 610 x 920 mm

1866

Montpellier, Musée Fabre, Montpellier Agglomération, 884.1.1

31

Raphael and La Fornarina

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 35 x 27 cm

1840

Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio: Bequest of Frederick W. Schumacher

32

Raphael and La Fornarina

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

1825

Graphite with white highlights on paper, 180 x 140 mm

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques: Collection Coutan. Don Hauguet, Schubert et Milliet, 1883

33

François I at the Deathbed of Leonardo da Vinci

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 40 x 50.5 cm

1818

Paris, Petit Palais, Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris, Inv. PDUT 01165

34

The Death of Leonardo da Vinci

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite, pen, grey-brown and black ink, grey-brown wash, partly reworked with metalpoint on paper, 380 x 482 mm

1818

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques, RF 1442 recto

35

Paolo and Francesca

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 48 x 39 cm

1819

Angers, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Legs. Turpin de Crissé. 1859, MTC 19

36

Philip V of Spain awarding the Golden Fleece to the Duke of Berwick in 1707

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite, coloured wash and wash of opaque pigments on paper, 387 x 495 mm

1864

Paris, Petit Palais, Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris, PPD 1282

37

Study for the Armour in Philip V awarding the Golden Fleece to the Duke of Berwick

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Lápiz compuesto, difumino y realces de clarión sobre papel pardo parcialmente decolorado, 273 x 180 mm

ca. 1819

Montauban, Musée Ingres, inv. 867.2050

38

Study for the Armour in Philip V awarding the Golden Fleece to the Duke of Berwick

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Conté crayon, stumping and white highlights on partly discoloured grey-brown paper, 207 x 244 mm

ca. 1819

Montauban, Musée Ingres, inv. 867.2049

39

Angelica, study for Ruggiero rescuing Angelica

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 84.5 x 42.5 cm

1819

Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des peintures, Legs Paul Cosson, 1926, RF 2520

Ruggiero rescuing Angelica
40

Ruggiero rescuing Angelica

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 147 x 190 cm

1819

Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des peintures, acquis en 1819, Inv. 5419

41

Ruggiero rescuing Angelica

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 54 x 46 cm

1841

Montauban, Musée Ingres, MI 844.1

42

Study of two Helmets and a Gauntlet for Ruggiero rescuing Angelica

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Conté crayon and barium titanate white on partly discoloured grey-brown paper, 143 x 197 mm

Montauban, Musée Ingres, MI. 867.2117

43

Study for Ruggiero rescuing Angelica

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Black chalk, 291 x 235 mm

Montauban, Musée Ingres, MI. 867.2107

44

The Grande Odalisque in Grisaille

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 83.2 x 109.2 cm

1824 - 1834

New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Catharine Lorillard Wolfe Collection, Wolfe Fund, 1938 (38.65)

Grande Odalisque
45

Grande Odalisque

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 91 x 162 cm

1814

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Peintures, Acquis en 1899, RF 1158

46

Two studies for the Grande Odalisque

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite on paper, 245 x 265 mm

ca. 1814

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques: Collection Coutan. Don Hauguet, Schubert et Milliet, 1883, RF 1451 recto

47

Odalisque with Slave

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite, sepia ink, watercolour and white highlights, 345 x 475 mm

1858

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques, RF 4622 recto

48

The small Bather or Interior of a Harem

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 35 x 27 cm

1828

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Peintures, acquis en 1908, RF 1728

49

Portrait of Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis, Duke of Orleans

Jean-August-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 218 x 131 cm

1844

Versailles, Musée national des châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon, MV 5209

50

Madame L.F. Bertin

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite on paper, 321 x 231 mm

1834

Paris, Musée du Louvre, RF 4380 recto

51

Madeleine Ingres wearing a floral cap

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite on paper, 271 x 218 mm

1841

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques, don E. Cartler, 1938, RF 29100

Louis-François Bertin
52

Louis-François Bertin

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 116 x 95 cm

1832

Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des peintures, acquis des descendants du modèle, en 1897, RF 1071

53

Amédée-David, the Count of Pastoret

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 103 x 83.5 cm

1826

Chicago, Chicago Art Institute, Estate of Dorothy Eckhart Williams; Robert Allerton, Bertha E. Brown, and Major Acquisitions funds, 1971.452

54

Madame de Senonnes

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 106 x 84 cm

1814

Nantes, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Inv.1028

55

Joan of Arc at the Coronation of Charles VII in Reims Cathedral

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 240 x 178 cm

1854

Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des peintures, Acquis en 1854

56

Christ among the Doctors

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 265 x 320 cm

1862

Montauban, Musée Ingres, M.I.867.71

57

Study for Christ among the Doctors

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil, graphite, red chalk and white chalk highlights on various canvases adhered to another canvas, 59 x 45 cm

1866

Montauban, Musée Ingres, M.I.867.72

Virgin Adoring the Host
58

Virgin Adoring the Host

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 113 cm diam.

1854

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Depôt aux Musées d'Orsay et de l'Orangerie, Inv. 20088

The Turkish Bath
59

The Turkish Bath

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas laid down to panel, 108 cm diam.

1862

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Peintures, Don de la Societé des Amis du Louvre, avec le concours de Maurice Fenaille, 1911, RF 1934

60

Study for The Turkish Bath or Woman with Three Arms

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on paper mounted on canvas, 249 x 259 mm

1852-59

Montauban, Musée Ingres, Inv. 867.1220

61

Study of nude figures for the Turkish Bath

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Black chalk on paper, 620 x 490 mm

1859

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques, RF 12292

62

Study for theTurkish Bath

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Pen and grey-brown ink, graphite on paper, 170 x 121 mm

1828-30

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques, don L.M. Guérin, 1932, RF 23354, recto

63

Madeleine Ingres Pregnant

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Black chalk, black ink wash and coloured washes, 215 x 148 cm

1814

Montauban, Musée Ingres,MI. 867.227

64

Madame Brazier

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite on paper, 259 x 191 mm

1828

Lyon, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, inv. MAD 1825

65

Madame Moitessier

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 147 x 100 cm

1851

Washington, National Gallery of Art, Samuel H. Kress Collection, 1946.7.18

Madame Moitessier
66

Madame Moitessier

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 120 x 92 cm

1844-56

London, The National Gallery. Bought, 1936. NG 4821

The Countess of Haussonville
67

The Countess of Haussonville

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 132 x 92 cm.

1845

New York, The Frick Collection, 1927, 1927.1.81

68

Madame Marcotte de Sainte-Marie

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 93 x 74 cm

1826

Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des peintures, Acquis des descendants du modèle, en 1923, avec le concours de D. David-Weill, RF 2398

69

Madame Marcotte de Sainte Marie

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Graphite on paper, 324 x 240 mm

1826

Paris, Musée du Louvre, RF 341393 recto

70

Self-portrait aged seventy-eight

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

Oil on canvas, 64 x 54 cm

1858

Florence, Galleria degli Uffizi, Soprintendenza Speciale per il patrimonio storico, artistico ed etnoantropologico e per il Polo Museale della città di Firenze, 1890, 1948 (1890 post)

 

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