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Exhibition

Zóbel. The Future of the Past

Museo Nacional del Prado. Madrid 11/15/2022 - 3/5/2023

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How can we appreciate the work of the great masters without being mere passive receptors of their appeal? How do we submerge ourselves in the art of the past without renouncing our commitment to the modern and contemporary avant-gardes? The answer according to Fernando Zóbel (Manila, 1924-Rome, 1984) was both simple and enormously sophisticated: study them in order to understand them and then reinvent them.

Forty-two paintings, fifty-one sketchbooks and eighty-five drawings and graphic works loaned from collections in Spain, the Philippines and the USA make up this survey through which the Museo Nacional del Prado, with the collaboration of the Comunidad de Madrid, pays tribute to Fernando Zóbel, a key figure in Spanish painting of the second half of the 20th century. Born into a Spanish family in Manila, Zóbel focused intensively on the paintings in the Prado and was the founder of the Museo de Arte Abstracto in Cuenca. He was an artist who saw his painting as an instrument with which he could navigate the complex routes traced by the history of art in order to both admire and understand them.

Zóbel. The future of the past explores the painter’s work through two themes that are essential for appreciating his unique contribution to contemporary abstract painting. The first revolves around the space between modern art and the legacy of artistic tradition, bringing together the studies that the artist made in museums around the world, in particular the Prado, with the aim of reconstructing his creative process. In addition, the exhibition charts Zóbel’s work through a second theme of a geographical and international nature, showing how drawing was the tool that allowed him in, an original and different way, to access the modernity that he encountered in Asia in the vernacular tradition of the Philippines and in Japanese and Chinese painting. Both themes arise from Zóbel’s own identity: born in Manila, he trained in the United States and then moved to Spain. Possessed of enormous intellectual curiosity and erudition, Fernando Zóbel was also a tireless traveller and an exceptionally cosmopolitan artist.

Zóbel’s work can be seen as a fascinating exercise in artistic education. His drawings teach us to look in a slow, tranquil and analytical manner. His paintings and drawings encompass within them his effort to understand the artistic intention that motivated painters such as Zurbarán, Sánchez Cotán, Van der Hamen and Velázquez.

The exhibition is curated by Felipe Pereda, Fernando Zóbel de Ayala Professor of Spanish Art at the University of Harvard, and Manuel Fontán del Junco, director of Museums and Exhibitions at Fundación Juan March, both closely connected to the artist in professional and institutional terms. Zóbel. The future of the past recreates this modern artist’s long dialogue with the great Old Masters, a dialogue established in museums around the world but perhaps above all in the Prado. Zóbel not only spent countless hours drawing and studying the paintings in the Museum but also generously donated to it a number of important drawings by 16th- to 18th-century Spanish masters.

Structured into five sections, the exhibition reconstructs Zóbel’s poetic and artistic journey, which was bounded by the two ends of a single principle: leaning to look in order to understand the art of the great masters, and applying what he learned to his own work in order to share that knowledge. Zóbel. The future of the past focuses on the artist’s work from a transnational perspective which surpasses the geographical limits of the three continents (Asia, North America and Europe) in which he lived. Rejecting attempts to classify his work within the narrow limits of national traditions, this exhibition offers an extremely innovative interpretation of his oeuvre.

With the aim of completing this survey of the work of Fernando Zóbel, at the end of the exhibition there will be an extensive section of graphic and visual documentary material as well as a projection of the documentary “Memories of the moment. Zóbel’s sketchbooks”. Specially made for the exhibition, its subject is the lengthy conversation with the great masters of the past that fills the almost 200 sketches left to us by the artist.

Curators:
Felipe Pereda, Fernando Zóbel de Ayala Professor of Spanish Art at the University of Harvard, and Manuel Fontán del Junco, director of Museums and Exhibitions at Fundación Juan March

Access

Room C. Jerónimos Building

RDF

RDF

Organized by:
Museo Nacional del Prado
With the collaboration of:
Comunidad de Madrid
Supported by:
Ayala Foundation
Fundación Juan March

Multimedia

Exhibition

The exhibition

The exhibition
Fernando Zóbel at Harvard, Massachusetts, in the 1950s
Photo: unknown photographer

In order to know how to paint, first you have to know how to look. And looking is something that can be learnt. Fernando Zóbel (Manila, 1924–Rome, 1984) gave practical expression to this credo throughout a fascinating, systematic yet creative exploration of painting that spanned a career lasting over forty years. Zóbel – who trained in the Philippines, Europe and America, graduated from Harvard and settled in Spain in the late 1950s – was at once painter, scholar, teacher, translator and collector; among other unusual projects, he also founded two museums: the Ateneo Art Gallery in Manila (1961) and the Museo de Arte Abstracto Español in Cuenca (1966).

Zóbel’s painting offers a singular example of 20th-century avant-garde art; if not unique, his oeuvre may certainly be considered extreme. For an artist with his deep and dazzling knowledge of the artistic and literary traditions both of the West and of Asia, modernism entailed not a break with figuration and the history of painting, but rather their rediscovery; not a forgetting of the past, but rather the revealing of a future embedded in the work of the great masters. Zóbel. The Future of the Past reconstructs the poetic and artistic journey of a painter guided by a twofold principle:

“Teaching to see and learning to see”.

I. The Discovery of the Past

I. The Discovery of the Past
Four drawings for Federico García Lorca’s Amor de don Perlimplín con Belisa en su jardín (The Love of Don Perlimplín and Belisa in the Garden)
1946-47
Pencil, pen, black ink and watercolor on paper
Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University, Houghton Library. Gift of Paul J. Haldeman

Born in Manila into a Spanish family, Fernando Zóbel de Ayala y Montojo arrived in Boston in 1946, leaving behind a city almost wholly destroyed by heavy bombing during the Second World War. For the next four years he devoted himself entirely to studying literature, focusing particularly on the work of Federico García Lorca, on whom he wrote his Harvard undergraduate thesis in 1949. While being introduced to the study of ancient drawing at Harvard’s Houghton Library, the young Zóbel was also fascinated by the work of the avant-garde artists whom the director of the School of Architecture, Walter Gropius, invited to exhibit on campus: from Joan Miró to Josef Albers, from George Grosz to Richard Lippold. Zóbel’s twin passions, painting and literature, converged in his illustrations for his own English translation of Lorca’s Don Perlimplín, drawings clearly influenced by Bauhaus aesthetics.

Cambridge

Fernando Zóbel was twenty-two when he entered Harvard University. By the time he left Manila, the city had been reduced to ruins, amongst which lay buried the memory of a long illness that had kept him confined for months to an orthopedic bed. Academic life in Cambridge “dazzled” him, as he reported in his journal: studying comparative literature – and particularly Lorca – under Harry Levin; being introduced to Goya’s graphic works by Phil Hofer, then a leading Goya specialist; learning about the history of contemporary American art; and finally encountering the Bauhaus aesthetic, brought to the campus by the Dean of the School of Architecture, Walter Gropius, whose projects elicited an amusingly sophisticated response from Zóbel in the student newspaper. Zóbel always retained fond memories of those years: “Scenes we remember as unchanging, because there we changed”, he wrote much later, paraphrasing W. H. Auden.

Manila

The Philippines, which had been a Spanish colony since the 16th century until in 1898 it became a United States protectorate, was declared independent on 4 July 1946. On his return to Manila in 1951, and over much of the following decade, Fernando Zóbel sought to identify the hallmark features of “Filipino artistic expression”. His research into the history of colonial art in the Philippines gave rise to a number of major studies including Philippine Religious Imagery (1963), in which he examined the transcultural identity of Filipino art. The drawings from the Ateneo Art Gallery on show in this room formed part of his research for the book.

The discovery of the “additive” nature of the islands’ art (a blend of vernacular, colonial and Asian influences), was later to prove fundamental in forging his own cosmopolitan approach to painting. At the same time, Zóbel’s intense activity as an avant-garde figure throughout the 1950s culminated in the opening, in 1961, of the Ateneo Art Gallery, the Philippines’ first museum of contemporary art. As a mediator of modernism in his native Manila, Zóbel was keen to decipher his country’s young, ancestral yet remarkably diverse culture.

II. Drawing by Painting: East Asian Calligraphy and Abstract Painting

II. Drawing by Painting: East Asian Calligraphy and Abstract Painting
Self-Portrait with Chinese Seal
1952
Pen and black ink on paper
Fundación Juan March

In the late 1950s, Zóbel began to work on large-format pieces, applying paint in sweeping black strokes on a white canvas, and blending drawing and painting techniques in a single gesture. While the gestural ambition apparent in these large compositions – known as the Black Series – clearly owed much to the great American Abstract Expressionists (Franz Kline, Mark Rothko or Jackson Pollock), his technique was also unmistakably influenced by Asian art, and particularly by Sino-Japanese calligraphy. Inspired by artists such as Munakata Shikō and Morita Shiryū, as well as by his Asian art history classes at the Ateneo de Manila, he explored “calligraphy as a form of abstract art”, seeking a kind of painting that would transcend all geographical boundaries.

III. Conversations with Masters

III. Conversations with Masters
Studies of Diego Velázquez’s The Spinners (Madrid, Museo del Prado)
Sketchbook no. 125, 1982. Pen, black ink and watercolor on paper
Fundación Juan March

“I pick up my copyist’s card (no. 342) at the Prado”, wrote Zóbel in one of his journals. “The main thing is that it entitles me to a chair. I was running out of paintings that happened to have a seat in front of them”. An innate traveler and assiduous visitor of museums, Zóbel always had a sketchbook in his pocket. He saw and looked by drawing, paying close attention in order to tease out the form, composition or texture of works of art. “Drawing from paintings is a way of seeing them”, he wrote, as if the paintings were endowed with some intimate nature that could only be reached by drawing them. Back in his studio, many of these drawings were annotated or colored, thus becoming a kind of “reagent” to be analyzed in his pictorial laboratory. Eventually, many of them served as the starting-point for an abstract composition, turning the whole process into a sort of “conversation” over time with each artist and his work. Zóbel brought to this process – which can be traced back to the earliest history of painting – a sophisticated sensibility and a consistency scarcely paralleled in contemporary art.

Perhaps no painter appealed more to Zóbel than Diego Velázquez. Eschewing the shocking realism regarded by many of his contemporaries (painters as well as historians, both in Spain and abroad) as a hallmark of the Spanish school, Zóbel was far more interested in the sophisticated complexity of Velázquez’s “realism”. Over the years, the Prado became for Zóbel a kind of laboratory, its masterpieces – by El Greco, Goya, Zurbarán, Ribera and of course Velázquez – providing an inexhaustible source of inspiration. Most of the drawings in this sketchbook are devoted to interpreting and systematically deconstructing The Spinners. On page after page, Zóbel analyzes Velázquez’s creative process, seeking to uncover the underlying, in a sense invisible, structure of the composition. Zóbel showed this sketchbook when interviewed for the television series Mirar un cuadro, recorded by Televisión Española in 1982, in which a contemporary artist was invited to comment on a masterpiece of the past.

IV. Dialectic Images

Walter Benjamin – whom Zóbel read and conscientiously quoted – used the term “dialectical image” to denote an image in which different fragments of time were superimposed, overlapping yet achieving no synthesis. From an early stage, working with paintings by the old masters, Zóbel became acutely aware of, and highly sensitive to, the multiple temporality of artworks. He progressively explored this phenomenon, first working with a range of media – from photography to photomontage – and later seeking to translate in his paintings the “instant” in which  the annotated and drawn memory, the memory of the past and the experience of the present met. This singular quest would lead him to develop, among other things, a gestural painting technique in which pigment was squirted onto the canvas from syringes, which he referred to as “paintbrushes for painting fog”. Though swiftly executed, his paintings are the result of a slow process: from sketch or photograph to drawing, and from cartoon to watercolor, until the final painting is achieved.

V. Landscapes of the Past and of the Future

V. Landscapes of the Past and of the Future
The View XXVI
1974
Oil and graphite on canvas
Palma, Colección Fundación Juan March, Museu Fundación Juan March

Landscape played an increasingly important role in Zóbel’'s later work. His works in this genre reflect and enlarge upon some of the overarching interests of earlier years: the grammar revealed in the paintings of past masters (particularly Paul Cézanne and Pierre Bonnard); the mixing of different media in the artistic process (photography, drawing, painting); and, fundamentally, painting not as imitation but as the memory of an experience, filtered through history. His own words, in that sense, are eloquent: “Just finished a picture, a kind of metaphor in abstract terms, of an almond tree in bloom. A step towards that Proustian thing in paint I have so often thought about. A representation not of things, but of their affect in the sensibility. I don’t expect recognition of an almond tree; I hope to convey or reproduce some of it, whatever it is, that made me want to paint it. That has nothing to do with botany or with ‘landscape’ in the normal sense.” (1963).

This exhibition is dedicated to all those who at some point, perhaps as young students, were thrilled and entranced by the genius of a drawing, by the haunting beauty of a figure or a brushstroke, and dreamt – just for a moment – of devoting their lives to art.

Room D, Zóbel: The Cosmopolitan Eye

More than just a traveler, the cosmopolitan – literally, a “citizen of the cosmos” – is one who learns to look beyond borders. Fernando Zóbel was born in Manila of Spanish parents, studied at in the United StatesHarvard, eventually settled in Spain and died suddenly in Rome; his life and work spanned three continents, thus anticipating the best of today’s global world. Well aware that being cosmopolitan is also a privilege, Zóbel devoted himself to fostering culture: as an educator, as a perceptive caricaturist, as a cultural “agitator” in his native Philippines, as a collector in Spain, and as the founder of two museums – the  Ateneo Art Gallery in Manila and the Museo de Arte Abstracto Español in Cuenca. In doing so, he combined his wide-ranging skills with an unstinting generosity.

Complementing the exhibition, Room D contains original documents and graphic material, together with an unreleased film about Zóbel’s sketchbooks, directed by Sonia Prior and produced by La Máquina de Luz (Madrid) and The Charitable Friends of Digamma Building (Cambridge, Mass.).

The 25-minute film “Memoria del instante. Los cuadernos de Fernando Zóbel”, will be screened continuously.

Asia

For Zóbel, unlike many artists of his generation, Asia was not some remote, unexplored region where one might satisfy a taste for the exotic. He was born in Asia, and lived Asia. For Zóbel, therefore, the Philippines were not the vanishing confines of some colonial dream, but rather the natural landscape of his childhood and youth, where he lived, painted and worked until well into his thirties; a setting which – according to the family and friends he often visited – he never completely abandoned. This unique status meant that Fernando Zóbel, whose artistic training had been influenced by European and American modernism, had a highly-personal view of Asia: of the art, traditions and history not just of the Philippines but of the continent as a whole. He was particularly fascinated by Chinese and Japanese art and culture, as familiar, contemporary phenomena. He made an effort to learn Chinese, and his well-stocked library boasted books not only on these cultures, but also on India and Tibet, Zen wisdom and Buddhism.

North America

Fernando Zóbel studied at Harvard University (1946–49) and at the Rhode Island School of Design (1954–55). He exhibited in Boston and later in New York (1960, 1965, 1968), and returned to America whenever he could. The Houghton Library – Harvard University’s rare book depository, where Zóbel worked with the curator Philip Hofer – holds hundreds of letters, photographs, class notes and other documents dating from his college years. They include mementos from friends – artists, lecturers and researchers, as well as students, who enjoyed a growing relationship with  Zóbel over the years – often donated in view of their historical interest or simply of their value as proof of the immediate and lasting affection that Zóbel’s generosity inspired. Many other documents are preserved at the Fox Club, which Zóbel joined in his sophomore year and for which he produced some of his most charmingly irreverent caricatures.

Europe

Though born in the Philippines, Zóbel always held a Spanish identity card and passport. He chose to settle in Spain, where he said he felt “at home”, but often returned to Manila, as well as traveling around the world. His life in Spain was underpinned by family ties, but also by friendships, often with other painters. He continued to paint and exhibit, both in Madrid – in the Biosca and Fortuny galleries, and the Sala Neblí – and elsewhere in Spain; in Seville, he shared a studio with the painter Carmen Laffón. At the same time, as early as 1955 he began to admire and acquire works by contemporary Spanish artists, with the express aim of supporting a generation he regarded as remarkably talented, obliged to live in difficult historical and political times, under a régime indifferent, if not actively hostile, to art. His most ambitious plan came to fruition in 1966: the founding of the Museo de Arte Abstracto Español – in the Hanging Houses of Cuenca – which was to be Spain’s first public collection of contemporary art. Though the museum was his creation, Zóbel included only two of his own works when presenting the collection.

The Educator, the Traveler and the Draughtsman as Ethnographer

“Learning to see and teaching to see”: with this concise formula, Fernando Zóbel summed up what we now term the “planning criteria” for the two museums he founded, the Ateneo Art Gallery in Manila and the Museo de Arte Abstracto Español in Cuenca. That formula also underpins his tireless activity as a lecturer and educator in Manila. The notes for his classes on Chinese and Japanese art and for an early course on contemporary art, like the four volumes of fascinating documents for his seminar on Chinese and Japanese painting and sculpture, testify both to his deep knowledge and to his enviable teaching skills, which combined clarity and rigor with a style at once approachable and amusing.

From his earliest years as an artist, as countless testimonies show, Zóbel broadened his horizons by traveling and drawing. His drawings and sketchbooks – which served as a laboratory for his painting – reveal an illustrator with a sense of humor but also a capacity for observation worthy of an ethnographer. An admirer of Saul Steinberg’s intelligent lines, Zóbel distilled the experience of his travels in drawings, annotations, maps and collages, as well as contributing cartoons to student magazines such as the Harvard Alumni Bulletin and The Advocate.

A Museum without a Library is not a Museum

Books are essential to our understanding of Fernando Zóbel: a lover of Asian calligraphy and Western typography, he was a constant, diligent and attentive reader. A survey of his library – its serried ranks of books meticulously underlined, annotated and appraised – shows that his extensive reading included first editions of titles which went on to become classics, among them Claude Lévi-Strauss’s Tristes tropiques (1955) and Marshall McLuhan’s Understanding Media (1964). Zóbel would soon endow the museum he founded in Cuenca with a library boasting a wealth of volumes on classical, modern and contemporary art, as well as essays and poetry, and an extraordinary collection of books on Asia; the library also subscribed to the international magazines of the time, such as Art in America, Das Kunstwerk or L’Œil. In 1966, in a Spain in many ways cut off from the cultural habits of Western democracies, the library of this small museum in a little provincial town already enjoyed a direct, uncensored window onto the contemporary scene. Zóbel’s library became a place with a “public” educational role, discreet yet hugely effective, and a magnet for young artists and scholars thirsty for knowledge.

Artworks

1

Lecture notes from the Harvard course “American Art from the Revolution to the Present Day” taught by Frederick Deknatel, spring term, 1949

Clothbound notebook. Blue ink on paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University, Houghton Library. Gift of Philip Hofer, 1983

2

Copy of George Grosz’s biography, A Little Yes and a Big No (New York, The Dial Press, 1946) dedicatated to Zóbel by the author

Fundación Juan March

3

“Theme and conflict in Lorcan drama”, Undergraduate Honor Essay Submitted by Zóbel to the Department of History and Literature, Harvard College, March 1949. Typed and bound manuscript

Fundación Juan March

4

Zóbel on the Harvard campus in the 1940s. Photographs by David Perkins

Cambridge, Mass., Houghton Library. Gift of David Perkins, 2012

Four drawings for Federico García Lorca’s Amor de don Perlimplín con Belisa en su jardín (The Love of Don Perlimplín and Belisa in the Garden), 1946–47
5

Four drawings for Federico García Lorca’s Amor de don Perlimplín con Belisa en su jardín (The Love of Don Perlimplín and Belisa in the Garden), 1946–47

Pencil, pen, black ink and watercolor on paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University, Houghton Library. Gift of Paul J. Haldeman

6

Still Life, Variation II, 1953

Oil on wood-pulp board

Manila, Colección Ayala Museum. Donación de Ayala Corporation, 2009

7

Frans Hals sketches

Sketchbook no. 4, 1950–51. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

8

Drawing of Hieronymus Bosch’s Saint John the Baptist in Meditation (Madrid, Museo Lázaro Galdiano)

Sketchbook no. 7, 1951. Pen, black ink and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

9

“Laetabundus rediit”, illustration for Carmina burana

Sketchbook no. 2, 1950. Pen, black ink, watercolor and red ballpoint pen on paper

Fundación Juan March

10

“The Critical Eye”, illustration for Stultifera navis (Ship of Fools)

Sketchbook no. 3, 1950. Pen, black ink and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

11

Carroza, 1953

Synthetic polymer paint on board, with frame designed by the artist

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University. Gift of the artist

12

Rafael Zulueta da Costa, Like the Molave and Collected Poems, s. l. [Manila], 1952

Cover designed by Fernando Zóbel for a limited edition of 150 copies

Colección particular

13

Fernando Zóbel, Philippine Religious Imagery, Manila, Ateneo de Manila, 1963

Fundación Juan March

14

Stilt House (Bahay kubo)

Sketchbook no. 5, 1951. Pen, black ink and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

15

Rural Philippine Hut, Manila

Sketchbook no. 9, 1951. Pen, black ink and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

16

La carroza, Rhode Island, 26 October 1954

Sketchbook no. 13, 1954. Etching, second state, pasted on sketchbook

Fundación Juan March

17

Preparatory drawings for Philippine Religious Imagery (Manila, 1963)

Sketchbook no. 27, 1962. Pencil, pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

18

Merchant ship, Cagayán and Pangasinán, 1950s

Pen and black ink on paper

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University. Gift of the artist

19

Biray in the Port of Pandan, 1950s

Pen and black ink on paper

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University. Gift of the artist

20

Church, Santa Lucía, Ilocos Sur, 1950s

Pen and black ink on paper

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University. Gift of the artist

21

Cabúgao, Ilocos Sur, 1950s

Pen and black ink on paper

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University. Gift of the artist

22

Bus Stop, Narvacán, Ilocos Sur, 1950s

Pen and black ink on paper

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University. Gift of the artist

23

Votive Offerings, 1950s

Pen and black ink on paper

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University, Gift of the artist

24

Silver Votive Offerings, Santa Lucía, 1950s

Pen and black ink on paper

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University. Gift of the artist

25

Votive Offerings and Church of Santa Lucía, 1950s

Pen and black ink on paper

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University. Gift of the artist

26

Funeral Procession, Batac, Ilocos Norte, 1950s

Pen and black ink on paper

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University. Gift of the artist

27

Carving of Saint Michael and Church San Miguel, Ilocos Sur, 1950s

Pen and black ink on paper

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University. Gift of the artist

28

Humming Quietly, n. d.

Kakejiku (hanging scroll). Brush and black ink on rice paper

Manila, Collection of Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University. Gift of the artist

Self-Portrait with Chinese Seal, 1952
29

Self-Portrait with Chinese Seal, 1952

Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

30

Oriental calligraphy seal album, n. d.

Accordion fold. Pencil and red ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

31

Landscape, 1940

Munakata Shikō (1903-1975)

Kakejiku (hanging scroll). Brush, black ink, and black and light color wash on paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Art Museums. Arthur M. Sackler Museum. Gift of Fernando Zóbel de Ayala

32

Stylized Ideograph reading “Tree” or “Upright” (“Ju”), 1973

Morita Shiryū (1912-1998)

Brush and black ink on paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Art Museums. Arthur M. Sackler Museum. Gift of Mrs. Linda Abegglen

33

Stylized Ideograph reading “Fragrance” (“Kō”), 1973

Morita Shiryū (1912-1998)

Brush and black ink on paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Art Museums. Arthur M. Sackler Museum. Oriental Objects Fund

34

Chinese landscape and calligraphy studies

Sketchbook no. 20, 1960–62. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

35

Calligraphy and abstract painting studies

Sketchbook no. 18, 1958–59. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

36

“Thirty lectures on Chinese and Japanese art”, Ateneo de Manila, 1960

 

Typed and bound manuscript

Fundación Juan March

37

Notes for lectures on China and Japan Art at the Ateneo de Manila University, c. 1956–61

Typewritten sheets, handwritten notes, and photomechanical reproductions

Fundación Juan March

38

Navacerrada, 1961

Oil on canvas

Madrid, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía

39

Ornithopter, 1962

Oil on canvas

Cuenca, Colección Fundación Juan March, Museo de Arte Abstracto Español

40

Project for a Monument in Honor of Bernini, 1963

Oil on canvas

Colección particular

41

Melainos I, II, III and IV, 1978

Dark-manner aquatint and drypoint; heliogravure on zinc plate, stamped on handmade paper with the artist’s anagram (series of 6 prints)

Madrid, Colección Fundación Juan March

42

Cuéllar, 1961

Oil on canvas

Colección particular

43

Drawings of Etruscan votive offerings in the Villa Giulia museum, Rome

Sketchbook no. 22, 1962. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

44

Antonio Palomino quotation and drawing of John Singer Sargent’s The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit (Boston, Museum of Fine Arts)

Sketchbook no. 56, 1965–66. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

Allegory of Chastity, 1505
45

Allegory of Chastity, 1505

Lorenzo Lotto (h. 1480-1556/57)

Oil on panel

Washington D. C., National Gallery of Art. Samuel H. Kress Collection

46

Study for The Dream of the Damsel, 1967

Pencil, pen, and black ink on pinkish-gray laid paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Art Museums / Fogg Museum. Gift of Paul J. Haldeman

47

Study for The Dream of the Damsel, 1967

Pen and black ink on white wove paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Art Museums / Fogg Museum. Gift of Paul J. Haldeman

48

Study for The Dream of the Damsel, 1967

Pen and black ink on buff laid paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Art Museums / Fogg Museum. Gift of Paul J. Haldeman

49

Study for The Dream of the Damsel, 1967

Pencil, pen, and black ink on beige laid paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Art Museums / Fogg Museum. Gift of Paul J. Haldeman

50

Study for The Dream of the Damsel, 1967

Pen and black ink on white graph paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Art Museums / Fogg Museum. Gift of Paul J. Haldeman

51

Study for The Dream of the Damsel, 1967

Pen, black ink, and white chalk on blue laid paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Art Museums / Fogg Museum. Gift of Paul J. Haldeman

The Dream of the Damsel, 1967
52

The Dream of the Damsel, 1967

Oil on canvas

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Art Museums / Fogg Museum. Purchase through the generosity of Paul J. Haldeman

53

The Dream of the Damsel II, 1967

Oil on canvas

Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao

54

Conversation with Veronese III, 1984

Oil on canvas

Colección Fundación Cajasol

55

Barocci II, 1977

Oil on canvas

Colección particular

56

Studies of one of Federico Barocci’s preparatory drawings for The Martyrdom of Saint Vitalis (Berlin, Staatliche Museen)

Sketchbook no. 118, 1977. Pen, black ink, and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

57

Studies of Michelangelo’s Rondanini Pietà (Milan, Castello Sforzesco) and Bandini Pietà (Florence, Museo dell’Opera del Duomo)

Sketchbook no. 74, 1980–81. Pen, black ink and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

58

Studies of Paolo Uccello’s Battle of San Romano (London, National Gallery)

Sketchbook no. 107, 1981–84. Pencil, pen, black ink, and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

60

Dialogue with Juan van der Hamen, 1969

Oil on canvas

Colección particular

61

Drawing of Juan van der Hamen’s Still Life with Sweetmeats and Glass Vessels (Madrid, Museo del Prado)

Sketchbook no. 30, 1963. Pen and black ink on Mead bond paper

Fundación Juan March

62

Study of Juan van der Hamen’s Still Life with Basket and Sweetmeats (Madrid, Museo del Prado)

Sketchbook no. 64, 1967–69. Pen and black ink on graph paper glued to the sketchbook

Fundación Juan March

63

Conversation with Saenredam, 1968

Oil on canvas

Colección particular

64

Conversation with a Sketch by Rubens, 1967

Oil on canvas

Manila, Lopez Museum and Library Collection

65

Third Conversation with Coorte, 1968

Oil on canvas

Colección particular

66

Study of Pieter Saenredam’s The Interior of the Grote Kerk at Haarlem (London, National Gallery)

Sketchbook no. 65, 1967–71. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

67

Studies of paintings by Hans van Aachen, Johann Liss, Cecco Bravo, Luca Giordano and Annibale Carracci

Sketchbook no. 88, 1977. Pen, black ink, watercolor, and photomechanical reproductions on paper

Fundación Juan March

68

Studies of Peter Paul Rubens’s Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (Buffalo, Albright-Knox Art Gallery)

Sketchbook no. 61, 1961. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

69

Study of Peter Paul Rubens’s The Rape of Proserpine (Madrid, Museo del Prado)

Sketchbook no. 31, 1963. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

70

Study of El Greco’s Saint Ildefonso (Illescas, Nuestra Señora de la Caridad)

Sketchbook no. 44, 1964. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

71

The Holy Face (Veronica), 1964

Etching, aquatint, and dry point on zinc plate, stamped on Acquabre paper

Madrid, Colección Fundación Juan March

72

The Holy Face II, 1959

Oil and bronze glitter on canvas

Colección particular

73

The Holy Face, c. 1660

Francisco de Zurbarán (1598-1664)

Oil on canvas

Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao

74

Studies of Francisco de Zurbarán’s The Vision of Saint Peter Nolasco (Madrid, Museo el Prado)

Sketchbook no. 21, 1961–62. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

Study of Francisco de Zurbarán’s Saint Serapion (Hartford, Wadsworth Atheneum) and Robert Rauschenberg quotation
75

Study of Francisco de Zurbarán’s Saint Serapion (Hartford, Wadsworth Atheneum) and Robert Rauschenberg quotation

Sketchbook no. 26, 1962–63. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

76

Study of Francisco de Zurbarán’s Portrait of the Devout John de Houghton (Cádiz, Museo de Bellas Artes)

Sketchbook no. 41, 1964. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

Studies of Diego Velázquez’s The Spinners (Madrid, Museo del Prado)
77

Studies of Diego Velázquez’s The Spinners (Madrid, Museo del Prado)

Sketchbook no. 125, 1982. Pen, black ink and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

78

Study of Diego Velázquez’s Christ after the Flagellation contemplated by the Christian Soul (London, National Gallery)

Sketchbook no. 110, 1982. Pen, black ink and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

79

Second of May II, 1984

Oil on canvas

Colección particular

80

Second of May III, 1984

Oil on canvas

Colección Miguel Ramos

81

Second of May IV, 1984

Oil and pastel on canvas

Cuenca, Colección Fundación Juan March, Museo de Arte Abstracto Español

82

Second of May, 1983

Oil on canvas

Colección particular

83

Study of Diego Velázquez’s Vulcan’s Forge (Madrid, Museo del Prado)

Sketchbook no. 38, 1964. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

84

Studies of Francisco de Goya’s Marquise of la Solana (Paris, Musée du Louvre)

Sketchbook no. 102, 1979–81. Pen, black ink and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

85

Study of Francisco de Goya’s Leocadia Zorrilla (Madrid, Museo del Prado)

Sketchbook no. 25, 1962–63. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

86

Dialogue with Degas, 1969

Oil on canvas

Colección Alejandro Padilla y Zóbel de Ayala

87

Kouros III, 1957

Oil and sand on canvas

Cortesía de Galería Cayón

88

Pink Transparency, 1964

Oil on canvas

Colección Antonio Garrote Ortega

89

Las Caldas XII: Color Study in Spring, 1974

Oil, graphite, ink and acrylic on canvas

Cuenca, Colección Fundación Juan March, Museo de Arte Abstracto Español

90

Diogenes Lantern for Eusebio Sempere, 1967

Oil on canvas

Colección Ars Citerior

91

Copies of the catalogue of Fernando Nuño’s photography exhibition in the rooms of the Ateneo de Madrid, November 1962

Madrid, Fundación Juan March, Archivo de Artistas Abstractos de España

92

Syringe used by Zóbel as a painting technique

Fundación Juan March. Depósito Peter Soriano

93

The Pink Cloud, 1968

Oil on canvas

Colección C. Hara

94

Landscape with Mustard Fields, 1972

Oil on canvas

Coleccion Alejandro Padilla y Zóbel de Ayala

95

The Patio III: Calle Vírgenes, 1980

Oil, pastel, and acrylic on canvas

Cuenca, Colección Fundación Juan March, Museo de Arte Abstracto Español

96

Atocha Nightscape, 1983

Oil and pastel on canvas

Cuenca, Colección Fundación Juan March, Museo de Arte Abstracto Español

97

Venetian Darkness, 1984

Oil and pastel on canvas

Cuenca, Colección Fundación Juan March, Museo de Arte Abstracto Español

98

Studies of children in motion

Sketchbook no. 46, 1965. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

99

Studies of Andrea Mantegna’s Saint Sebastian (Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum)

Sketchbook no. 101, 1979. Pen, brown ink and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

100

Study of a figure

Sketchbook no. 48, 1965. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

101

George Kubler quotation and drawing of a painting by Zóbel himself

Sketchbook no. 66, 1968. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

102

Walter Benjamin quotation and drawing of a bicycle

Sketchbook no. 121, 1977–78. Pen, black ink and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

103

Study and collage of Michael Sweerts’s The Drawing Class (Haarlem, Frans Hals Museum)

Sketchbook no. 113, 1984. Pen, black ink, watercolor, and photomechanical reproductions on paper

Fundación Juan March

104

Football 13, 1973

Oil on canvas

Colección de Charles R. de Luzuriaga

105

Football 14, 1973

Oil on canvas

Colección particular

106

Football 15, 1973

Oil on canvas

Colección particular

107

Color studies of trainers and German costume

Sketchbook no. 92, 1977. Pen, black ink, watercolor, and photo collage on paper

Fundación Juan March

108

Studies of children

Sketchbook no. 126, 1982. Pen, black ink, watercolor, and photo collage on paper

Fundación Juan March

109

Study of a child and Juan Ramón Jiménez poem / Juan Ramón Jiménez poem and study of a child

Sketchbook no. 122, 1977–78. Pen, black ink and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

110

Sports Diagonal, 1974

Portfolio containing seven different states of the etched zinc plate Fútbol (1973) stamped on Guarro paper. Folder design by Jaume and Jordi Blassi

Madrid, Colección Fundación Juan March

111

Children playing football

Sketchbook no. 129, 1983. Fold-out photographic collage

Fundación Juan March

112

El Júcar – Autumn

Box with fold-out photographs

Fundación Juan March

113

Study of the Retiro park

Box with fold-out photographs

Fundación Juan March

114

Boy Swinging from a Tree, 1950s

Sepia toned photographic paper mounted on cardboard

Manila, Colección Ayala Museum Collection. Donación de Jaime y Beatriz Zóbel de Ayala

115

Boy atop a Barrel, 1950s

Sepia toned photographic paper mounted on cardboard

Manila, Colección Ayala Museum Collection. Donación de Jaime y Beatriz Zóbel de Ayala

116

Boy Stretching a Handkerchief under an Awning, 1950s

Sepia toned photographic paper mounted on cardboard

Manila, Colección Ayala Museum Collection. Donación de Jaime y Beatriz Zóbel de Ayala

117

Madrid City, 1950s

Sepia toned photographic paper mounted on cardboard

Manila, Colección Ayala Museum Collection. Donación de Jaime y Beatriz Zóbel de Ayala

118

Outdoor Movie, 1950s

Sepia toned photographic paper mounted on cardboard

Manila, Colección Ayala Museum Collection. Donación de Jaime y Beatriz Zóbel de Ayala

119

Boy and Back View of Man Wearing a Dark Coat, 1950s

Photographic paper mounted on cardboard

Manila, Colección Ayala Museum Collection. Donación de Jaime y Beatriz Zóbel de Ayala

120

First Holy Communion, 1950s

Sepia toned photographic paper mounted on cardboard

Manila, Ayala Museum Collection. Gift of Jaime and Beatriz Zóbel de Ayala

121

Self-Portrait above Sinks, 1950s

Photographic paper mounted on cardboard

Manila, Colección Ayala Museum Collection. Donación de Jaime y Beatriz Zóbel de Ayala

122

Fernando Zóbel, Mis fotos de Cuenca, Cuenca, Museo de Arte Abstracto Español, 1975

Fundación Juan March

123

Dummy of the book Mis fotos de Cuenca

Photographs on paper and notes in pencil

Fundación Juan March

124

El Júcar en Cuenca, Madrid, Fernando Zóbel, 1982

Book of photographs by Fernando Zóbel

Fundación Juan March

125

Dummy of the book El Júcar en Cuenca

Photographs on paper and notes in ink

Fundación Juan March

126

Mis fotos de Sevilla, Sevilla, Monte de Piedad y Caja de Ahorros de Sevilla, 1985

Book of photographs by Fernando Zóbel, with a foreword by Rafael Pérez-Madero

Fundación Juan March

127

Children, 1959

Photograph album

Fundación Juan March

128

“Boy facing a wall”, from the series Cuenca y sus niños, c. 1958–69

Photograph

Fundación Juan March

129

The View Times Six, 1974

Portfolio containing six colored prints painted in oil using stencils on a common background stamped in offset. Folder design by Jaume and Jordi Blassi

Cuenca, Colección Fundación Juan March, Museo de Arte Abstracto Español

130

Cuenca Sketchbook, 1963–65

Manuscript bound in leather. Pen and black ink on paper

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University, Houghton Library. Gift of Fernando Zóbel to the Printing and Graphic Arts Collection, 1966

131

Copies of the book by Fernando Zóbel, Cuenca: Sketchbook of a Spanish Hill Town, with a foreword by Philip Hofer, New York, Walker & Co.; Cambridge, Mass., Harvard College Library, Department of Printing and Graphic Arts, 1970

Fundación Juan March

132

Drawing of the Northern Lights, Cuenca, 17 August 1965, 7:45 pm

Sketchbook no. 53, 1965. Pen and black ink on paper

Fundación Juan March

133

Landscape studies, Cuenca

Sketchbook no. 116, 1975. Pen, black ink, and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

134

River Júcar X, 1971

Oil and graphite on canvas

Cuenca, Colección Fundación Juan March, Museo de Arte Abstracto Español

135

Júcar. Four Lines (with a Wang Wei poem), 1972

Oil on canvas

Colección Ayala Corporation

136

Studies of Stonehenge and photograph of the author at the site

Sketchbook no. 86, 1976–77. Pen, black ink, watercolor, and photograph on paper

Fundación Juan March

Study of the Harvard University campus
137

Study of the Harvard University campus

Sketchbook no. 83, 1976. Pen, brown ink, and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

138

Study of two versions of Paul Cézanne’s Mont Sainte-Victoire

Sketchbook no. 97, 1978. Pen, black ink, and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

139

Study of tulip fields seen from the train while travelling from Amsterdam to Rotterdam

Sketchbook no. 82, 1975–76. Pen, black ink, and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

140

Study of the Venetian Lagoon

Sketchbook no. 80, 1975. Pen, black ink, and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

141

The View XXIV, 1974

Oil on canvas

Colección particular

142

Study for The View, 1967

Photo collage, c-print on paper and cardboard

Madrid, Colección Fundación Juan March

143

Hocinos Landscape, Carretera de Palomera, Cuenca

Sketchbook no. 119, 1977. Pen, black ink, and watercolor on paper

Fundación Juan March

144

The View VIII, 1974

Oil on canvas

Colección Jaime Augusto y Elizabeth Zóbel de Ayala

145

Study for The View, 1974

Oil, graphite, and color pencil on paper

Cuenca, Colección Fundación Juan March, Museo de Arte Abstracto Español

146

The View X, 1974

Oil on canvas

Coleccion Alejandro Padilla y Zóbel de Ayala

The View XXVI, 1974
147

The View XXVI, 1974

Oil and graphite on canvas

Palma, Colección Fundación Juan March, Museu Fundación Juan March

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