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Spanish Drawings from the British Museum: Renaissance to Goya

20.03.2013 - 16.06.2013

The exhibition opens with the oldest drawings by 16th-century Spanish artists working in Castile, including Alonso Berruguete. This section also explores the repercussion on Spanish drawing of the presence of foreign artists in the country, primarily Italians, who were working on the decoration of the monastery at El Escorial. Among them was Pellegrino Tibaldi, represented here by one of the most outstanding architectural drawings of the 16th century, Study for the Decoration of the Library at El Escorial. This section continues with the work of some of the most important 17th-century artists active in the different regions of Spain, which were independent artistic centres. They include Vicente Carducho, Alonso Cano and Francisco Rizi in Madrid; Francisco Pacheco, Murillo and Zurbarán in Seville; Juan Ribalta in Valencia and José de Ribera in Naples. All represent the great burgeoning of drawing that took place in the Golden Age, of which outstanding examples are The Dwarf Miguelito by Rizi, The Archangel Michael by Murillo, A miraculous healing by a Saint attributed to Ribalta and Tityus (or Prometheus) by Ribera. From the 18th century the exhibition includes key works by Luis Paret (Masked Ball at the Teatro del Príncipe) and by José Camarón (Oriental Woman under an Awning) as well as drawings by other masters of this period, demonstrating artists’ increasing use of the medium at this period in response to international trends and influences. The exhibition concludes with the work of Francisco de Goya, who permanently changed the context of Spanish art and contributed to making the country one of the leading artistic centres in Europe. Goya’s drawings explore the imagination, beliefs and human conduct. Eight works that span his entire career and have never previously been seen in Spain (including the magnificent drawing of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington) reveal his incomparable versatility as a draughtsman and the variety of subjects that attracted his interest.
Curator:
Mark P. McDonald, Curator in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum

Access

Room C. Jerónimos Building

Opening time

Monday to Saturday from 10am to 8pm. Sunday and holidays from 10am to 7pm

Supported by:
Fundación de Amigos del Museo del Prado
Organized by:
British Museum
Museo Nacional del Prado

Multimedia

Exhibition

Importing graphic practices: Castile 1550–1600

Importing graphic practices: Castile 1550–1600
Study for the Decoration of the Escorial Library
Pellegrino Tibaldi
Pen and brown ink, with brown wash over black chalk, 332 x 485 mm, c. 1588 - 1592
©The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.176

In 1561 Philip II established Madrid as his capital. Two years later he laid the foundation stone for El Escorial, which was conceived as a monastery, the burial chamber of the Hapsburg dynasty, a library and the repository for Philip’s vast collections of art, relics and natural wonders. Completed in 1584, it required an enormous workforce including engineers, architects and artists from across Europe.

The time he had spent outside Spain during his youth, where he had seen the work of some of the best Flemish and Italian artists, shaped Philip II’s taste for art. Renowned Italian painters such as Federico Zuccaro, Pellegrino Tibaldi and Luca Cambiaso were chosen for their ability as fresco painters and they executed most of the mural decoration of the Escorial. Their drawing styles and techniques and how they used drawings to prepare their compositions had a lasting impact on the Spanish artists working alongside them, as well as on future generations. Other Spanish masters, such as Alonso Berruguete, spent time in Italy. What they experienced during their travels left a deep mark on their work and is visible in the drawings they made on returning home.

Madrid, artistic capital, 1600–1700

Madrid, artistic capital, 1600–1700
The Siege of Rheinfelden
Vicente Carducho
Pen and brown ink, blue and brown wash over black chalk, 318 x 415 mm, 1634
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1850,0713.9

The main developments in prints and drawings in and around Madrid during the late 1500s and early 1600s are related to changes in techniques and practices in an environment receptive to innovation.

The masters who best reflect this transformation are the Italians who came to Spain as children, such as Vicente Carducho, or who belonged to the first generation born in Spain, like Eugenio Cajés. They inherited the belief that drawing was the key to the creative process and acted as an important link between their predecessors and a new generation of artists who would spearhead the golden age of Spanish drawing. From around 1650 we may speak of the existence of a style of painting distinctive to Madrid. Artists of this period, such as Francisco Rizi, Juan Carreño de Miranda, Francisco Camilo and Francisco de Herrera the Younger, used highly varied drawing techniques, with mixed media and larger sheets of better-quality paper. Drawings were put to many uses, such as planning theatre design, triumphal entries and architectural projects.

Andalusia, 1550–1700. Seville, Granada and Cordoba

Andalusia, 1550–1700. Seville, Granada and Cordoba
Design for an Altarpiece
Alonso Cano
Pen and brown ink, brown wash over black chalk, 309 x 232 mm, c. 1660
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1950,0211.16

During the early 1500s Seville became the commercial centre of the Spanish Empire. Like Cordoba and unlike Madrid, it had no court to focus artistic activity and commissions therefore came mainly from the church or private patrons.

It is difficult to form a clear picture of workshop practice in 16th-century Seville. In fact it was not until the 1600s that the city became a centre of artistic production with artists like Francisco de Zurbarán and Bartolomé Esteban Murillo rising to great prominence. In 1660 Murillo and Francisco Herrera the Younger established an academy of drawing in Seville. It operated for fourteen years and taught many students, reinforcing drawing as the basis of artistic practice.

Other masters trained in Seville and went on to have brilliant careers in the capital, such as Diego Velázquez, Herrera the Younger and Alonso Cano. Although these artists’ mobility make it difficult to identity a regional style, dominant figures such as Francisco Pacheco in Seville and Antonio del Castillo in Cordoba had a tremendous influence on those around them.

Drawing in Valencia, 1500–1700. Ribera in Naples

Drawing in Valencia, 1500–1700. Ribera in Naples
A Saint Tied to a Tree
José de Ribera
Red chalk, 232 x 170 mm, 1626
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1850,0713.4

During the 1500s and 1600s Valencia prospered thanks to its thriving commercial trade in the Mediterranean. For many merchants and travellers the city was the point of entry before moving on to other parts of Spain. From the 15th century onwards its wealth and cosmopolitan nature were expressed through extensive artistic patronage and it is no coincidence that it was one of the first places where graphic practices associated with Renaissance Italy took hold.

Francisco Ribalta and Pedro de Orrente established the general guidelines for drawing in Valencia in the first half of the 17th century. Their skill at handling wash sets them apart from artists anywhere else in Spain. From the late 1600s and throughout the whole of the 1700s Valencia produced prominent draughtsmen who trained at private and official academies of drawing, such as Vicente Salvador Gómez, Juan Conchillos and José Camarón.

José de Ribera deserves special attention owing to his outstanding activity as a draughtsman. Although he was born in Játiva (Valencia), he pursued most of his career in Naples, where he practiced drawing as a formal and independent exercise.

Drawing in the 1700s

Drawing in the 1700s
A Masked Ball at the Coliseo del Príncipe
Pen and grey ink and grey wash over black chalk, 304 x 492 mm, c. 1767
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1890,1209.50

The French artists sent for to Madrid by the new Bourbon dynasty had a considerable part in shaping taste during the first half of the 1700s. However, artistic alliances began to be dissolved towards the middle of the century owing to the greater influence of their Italian counterparts and of the Bohemian painter Anton Raphael Mengs.

The event that had the most profound consequences for artistic practice and the professional recognition of the artists working in Spain was the founding of the Academy of San Fernando in Madrid in 1744 where drawing was a fundamental aspect of teaching. The dissemination of academic studies and the wish to bring art up to the standard of other European countries ensured drawing a solid position. By the late 1700s Spanish masters had a thorough knowledge of the latest artistic trends.

Although the drawings made in Madrid in the 1700s were chiefly academic studies or preparatory sketches for paintings or frescoes, this was not their only use. Other varieties were architectural drawings and those preparatory for prints.

Francisco de Goya (1746–1828)

Francisco de Goya (1746–1828)
Don Quijote Beset by Monsters<
Francisco de Goya
Brush drawing in grey-brown ink and wash, 207 x 144 mm, c. 1812 - 1820
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1862,0712.188

Goya died in Bordeaux at the age of eighty-two leaving a body of work remarkable for its imagination, artistic vision and profound humanity. Through his drawings he explored fantasy, beliefs and human conduct and often grouped these works into series in order to explore more complex themes. Goya witnessed major social and political changes ranging from the terrible effects of the Inquisition to the French occupation. The independence of his political thought, his criticism of superstition and his rejection of intellection oppression reflect the ideas of the Age of Enlightenment.

Although his dedication to graphic art makes him an exception, he was far from being a ‘misunderstood genius’ and his work should be interpreted in the context of the scientific, social and artistic development that was taking place in the 18th century.

Goya expressed his most intimate thoughts in his albums, which are rich samplers of his imagery and provide an outstanding insight into his personal world and creative process. He made drawings for all his prints and carried on drawing until the end of his life with a steady hand and boundless imagination.

Spanish drawings in the British Museum

Spanish drawings in the British Museum
Head of a Monk
Atribuido a Francisco de Zurbarán
Black chalk, grey wash with traces of pen and ink, 276 x 195 mm, c. 1635 - 1655
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1895,0915.873

The collection of Spanish drawings in the British Museum is one of the best outside Spain and includes works of exceptional quality. It comprises around 200 works with sheets by artists from the mid-16th to the 20th century. The collection has grown in a sporadic manner. The first acquisitions in the mid-19th century reflect the growing interest in Spanish art in Britain, encouraged, among other factors, by the publication of the two volumes of the Handbook for Travellers in Spain by Richard Ford (1845) and of Annals of the Artists of Spain by William Stirling Maxwell (1848). Both writers were also collectors: Ford assembled a large group of prints and drawings, including some by Murillo that he acquired in Seville, while Stirling Maxwell collected paintings and drawings. Among the first Spanish drawings to enter the British Museum were works from the collection of the Viscount of Castel Ruiz, purchased at auction at Christie’s in 1846. They included The Apotheosis of Saint Francis of Assisi by Teodoro Ardemans and Saint Ildefonso receives the Chasuble from the Virgin by Antonio de Pereda. This first acquisition by the British Museum of drawings from a Spanish collection would be followed by further purchases from Spain during the 19th century. The Castel Ruiz collection constituted an important group of 30 works. Some were attributed to Italian artists at the time but have recently been re-assigned to the Spanish school including Queen Esther fainting by Mosén Domingo Saura. In 1850, four years after the auction of 1846, the Museum purchased a key group of Spanish drawings from the London print dealer and publisher Henry Graves, including The garrotted Man by Goya, Saint tied to a Tree by Ribera, and Carducho’s The Storming of Rheinfelden.

In the second half of the 19th century the growing interest in Spanish drawings in Britain coincided with an increasing appreciation of Spanish art in general, evident in the creation of collections that specialised in other fields such as Spanish painting and the decorative arts. Four of the nearly 60 works attributed to Murillo that belonged to Alleyne Fitzherbert, Baron of St Helens, whose collection was sold in 1840, entered the British Museum, two of them in 1873 as a donation from James Hughes Anderdon. The splendid group of Spanish drawings assembled by the Museum encouraged the arrival of further works and in 1890 the collection was increased with two key drawings by Luis Paret y Alcázar and one by Miguel Jacinto Meléndez, which considerably strengthened the 18th-century holdings.

Among the 1,000 drawings that the Museum acquired in 1895 were some of the most finest Spanish sheets from the collection of John Malcolm of Poltalloch (1805-1893), a wealthy Scottish landowner and magistrate who lived in London. In 1860 Sir John Charles Robinson (1824-1913), director of the art collections at the new South Kensington Museum (later the Victoria and Albert Museum) sold Malcolm his notable collection of drawings. The importance of that group can be reconstructed through the catalogue of Malcolm’s drawings that Robinson produced in 1869. Over the following years Robinson continued to advise Malcolm on his acquisitions, travelling to Spain where, among other items, he acquired a group of drawings with the help of José Madrazo, director of the Museo del Prado and founder and director of the Real Establecimiento Litográfico in Madrid. They included Head of a Monk attributed to Zurbarán and The Assumption of the Virgin by Herrera Barnuevo. In the introduction to the 1869 catalogue Robinson set out the criteria that had guided him in building up Malcolm’s collection. Of the four rules that he considered essential, two were as follows: “Aside from the attribution, only collect examples of indisputable excellence as works of art”, and “In the case of less eminent masters, only acquire the most outstanding and best preserved examples.” It is clear that he applied these criteria in the case of the drawings by Zurbarán, Herrera Barnuevo and others that came to the British Museum from the same source.

In the 20th century a series of important acquisitions and donations further enriched the collection. Drawings from the collection of Sir Thomas Phillipps (1792-1872) donated by Count Antoine Seilern in 1946 through Philipps’s grandson and heir Thomas Fitzroy Fenwick included magnificent drawings by Spanish artists, among them Christ struck by a Torturer by Ribera and The Last Supper by Luis Antonio Planes. This donation also included four sheets considered at the time to be by Velázquez but now attributed to the Florentine artist Jacopo Confortini (1602-1672). In the second half of the century and coinciding with the decline in interest in this field, the Museum was less able to acquire Spanish drawings, thus losing the opportunity to enlarge the collection with works by Goya that were still available at that time. The superb group of prints by that artist in the Museum’s collection arrived relatively late, in 1975, from the collection of the Hispanist Tomás Harris. Since then, Spanish drawings have only been acquired sporadically although there have been some excellent additions including the noteworthy Design for an Altarpiece in a Chapel by Sebastián de Herrera Barnuevo. Despite this and due to the generosity of the Ottley Group that funds the acquisition of Old Master drawings, in the past few years some important drawings have entered the collection, including Study of a male Nude with one Knee on the Ground by Juan Conchillos y Falcó and Christ distributing Bread to his Disciples by Miguel Barroso and Diego López de Escuriaz.

Artworks

1

Study for the Decoration of the Escorial Library

Pellegrino Tibaldi
Pen and brown ink, with brown wash over black chalk, 332 x 485 mm
1588 – 1592
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.176

2

Christ Presented to the People

Pellegrino Tibaldi
Pen and brown ink and brown wash over black chalk, heightened with white, 548 x 293 mm
c. 1587 - 1590
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1946,0713.608

3

Christ Distributing Bread to his Disciples

Attributed to Miguel Barosso and Diego López de Escuriaz
Pen and brown ink, brown wash, white heightening over black chalk, 170 x 270 mm
1587 - 1589
© The Trustees of the British Museum 2011,7109.1

4

Assumption of the Virgin

Alonso Berruguete
Brush and brown ink, brown wash and pen, heightened with white, over black chalk, 319 x 193 mm
c. 1555 - 1561
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1895,0915.866

5

The Adoration of the Magi

Vicente Carducho
Red and black chalk, with brown wash, heightened with white, 195 x 166 mm
c. 1616 - 1622
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1946,0713.1024

6

Saint Bruno Praying in La Torre, Calabria

Vicente Carducho
Pen and black ink, chalk and brown wash, heightened with white, 326 x 285 mm
1626 - 1632
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1875,0710.2621

7

The Siege of Rheinfelden

Vicente Carducho
Pen and brown ink, blue and brown wash over black chalk, 318 x 415 mm
1634
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1850,0713.9

8

Saint Ildephonsus and Recesvinto at the Tomb of Saint Leocadia

Eugenio Cajés
Black chalk and brown wash, 228 x 160 mm
c. 1615
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1973,0721.1

9

The Circumcision of Christ

Eugenio Cajés
Pen and brown ink, brown wash over black chalk, 251 x 172 mm
c. 1600 - 1615
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1938,1210.4

10

The Circumcision of Christ

Hendrik Goltzius
Engraving, 484 x 357 mm
1594
© The Trustees of the British Museum F,3.129

11

Studies of Rearing Horse and Horseman

Attributed to DiegoVelázquez
Black chalk, 247 x 164 mm
c. 1630 - 1640
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1850,1014.101

12

Saint Jerome in the Desert

Antoniode Pereda
Red, black and white chalk with brown and grey wash, 255 x 215 mm
c. 1640 - 1645
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1895,0915.883

13

Saint Ildephonsus receiving the Chasuble from the Virgin Mary

Antonio de Pereda
Red chalk with red wash and white heightening, 320 x 210 mm
c. 1640 - 1660
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.181

14

The Rest of the Holy Family on the Flight into Egypt

Francisco Camilo
Brush with red-brown ink and red wash over red chalk, 266 x 206 mm
c. 1650 - 1670
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1875,0710.2620

15

Assumption of the Virgin

Sebastián de Herrera Barnuevo
Pen and brown ink and brown wash over black chalk, 250 x 198 mm
c. 1650 - 1658
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1895,0915.876

16

Design for an Altarpiece in a Chapel

Sebastián de Herrera Barnuevo
Pen and brush, brown and black ink over black chalk, brown, grey, red and green wash, 517 x 345 mm
c. 1650 - 1660
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1993,0724.2

17

Musical Angels

Francisco de Herrera el Mozo
Pen and brown ink and brown wash, touched with watercolour, 296 x 189 mm
c. 1650 - 1656
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.184

18

The Virgin of Expectation appearing to Saint Simón Rojas

Francisco Rizi
Pen and brown ink, brown and grey wash over black chalk, 196 x 125 mm
c. 1650
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1895,0915.878

19

The Dwarf Miguelito

Francisco Rizi
Black chalk with touches of red chalk, 268 x 161 mm
c. 1680 - 1683
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1850,0713.6

20

Saint Isidore praying

Matías de Torres
Pen and brown ink, grey-brown wash, 217 x 257 mm
1680
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.166

21

The Virgin bestowing the Rosary on Saint Dominic Guzmán

Francisco Ignacio Ruiz de la Iglesia
Pen and grey ink and brown wash over black chalk, 267 x 203 mm
c. 1690
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1850,0713.1

22

The Execution of Jephthah's Daughter

Luis de Vargas
Pen and brown ink, brown wash over black chalk, 280 x 383 mm
c. 1550 - 1568
© The Trustees of the British Museum Nn,7.52.2

23

Saint John the Evangelist

Francisco Pacheco
Pen and dark brown ink, brown wash, heightened with white over black chalk, 330 x 222 mm
1632
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1928,0714.1

24

Saint Matthew and the Angel

Francisco Pacheco
Pen and dark brown ink, brown wash, heightened with white over black chalk, 342 x 236 mm
1632
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1977,0507.11

25

The Infant Christ

Attributed to Juan de Roelas
Pen and brown ink and blue wash, 155 x 106 mm
c. 1600 - 1625
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1920,1116.22

26

Head of a Monk

Attributed to Francisco de Zurbarán
Black chalk, grey wash with traces of pen and ink, 276 x 195 mm
c. 1635 - 1655
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1895,0915.873

27

Saint Thomas

Francisco de Herrera el Viejo
Pen and brown ink, 298 x 184 mm
1642
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1895,0915.871

28

Study of a Seated Male Nude

Circle of Herrera the Elder
Pen and brown ink over black chalk, 418 x 263 mm
c. 1640 - 1650
© The Trustees of the British Museum Pp,4.54

29

The Miracle of Saint Ildephonsus receiving the Chasuble from the Virgin

Alonso Cano
Pen and brown ink and brown wash over black chalk, 183 x 311 mm
c. 1643 – 1652
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1895,0915.877

30

Design for an Altarpiece

Alonso Cano
Pen and brown ink, brown wash over black chalk, 309 x 232 mm
c. 1660
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1950,0211.16

31

Assumption of the Virgin

Alonso Cano
Pen and brown ink, brown wash over black chalk, 234 x 130 mm
c. 1661 - 1662
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1910,0212.43

32

The Virgin and Child Appearing to Saint Francis of Assisi and Saint Teresa of Avila

Pedro Atanasio Bocanegra
Pen and brown ink, brown wash over black chalk, 196 x 286 mm
c. 1660 - 1668
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.183

33

Study of Seven Heads

Antonio del Castillo y Saavedra
Brush and brown ink over black chalk, 286 x 203 mm
c. 1660 - 1668
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1946, 0713.1308

34

Saint Anthony of Padua and the Miracle of the resurrection of the assassinated man

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo
Pen and brown ink, brown wash over black chalk, 345 x 265 mm
c. 1645 - 1646
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1920,1116.20

35

Studies for Saint John the Baptist

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo
Pen and brown ink over black chalk, 220 x 338 mm
c. 1650 - 1655
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1873,0614.212

36

Saint Isidore of Seville

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo
Pen and brown ink, brown and grey wash over black chalk, 260 x 208 mm
1655
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1873,0614.214

37

The Archangel Michael

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo
Pen and brown ink over black chalk, 268 x 189 mm
c. 1655 - 1660
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1873,0614.216

38

Saint Francis of Paola

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo
Black and red chalk, 332 x 232 mm
c. 1670 - 1675
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1850,0713.2

39

The Penitent Saint Peter

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo
c. 1670 - 1680
Pen and brown ink, 187 x 153 mm
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1946,0713.1155

40

Saint Joseph kneeling before the Virgin and the Christ Child

Attributed to Francisco Meneses Osorio
Black chalk, 403 x 282 mm
c. 1665 - 1700
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1895,0915.884

41

A Seated Ecclesiastic

Attributed to Cornelio Schut
Pen and brown ink, brown wash over black chalk, 273 x 196 mm
c. 1660 - 1680
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1946,0713.825

42

A Miraculous Healing by a Saint

Attributed to Juan Ribalta
Pen and brown ink, brush with brown wash over black chalk, heightened with white on prepared paper, 307 x 230 mm
c. 1610 - 1628
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.174

43

San José y el Niño

Vicente Salvador Gómez
Pen and brown ink and greyish watercolour, 262 x 171 mm
c. 1674
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.186

44

The Temptation of Saint Anthony

Agostino Carracci after Jacopo Tintoretto
Engraving, 493 x 328
1582
© The Trustees of the British Museum U,2.93

45

Queen Esther Fainting

Mosén Domingo Saura
Pen and brown ink, brown wash over black chalk, 176 x 266 mm
c. 1680 - 1700
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.202

46

A Partly Kneeling Male Nude

Juan Antonio Conchillos y Falcó
Black charcoal and white chalk on blue prepared paper, 393 x 251 mm
c. 1690 - 1705
© The Trustees of the British Museum 2011,7065.1

47

The Martyrdom of Saint Bartholomew

José de Ribera
Pen and brown ink, 133 x 100 mm
c. 1620 - 1624
© The Trustees of the British Museum T,13.111 (5212-111)

48

The Martyrdom of Saint Bartholomew

José de Ribera
Etching and engraving, 314 x 241 mm
1624
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1874,0808.746

49

Tityus or Prometheus

José de Ribera
Pen and brown ink and wash, 228 x 168 mm
c. 1620 - 1625
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1937,1008.29

50

A Saint Tied to a Tree

José de Ribera
Red chalk, 232 x 170 mm
1626
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1850,0713.4

51

Christ Beaten by a Tormentor

José de Ribera
Red chalk, 185 x 215 mm
c. 1625 - 1630
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1946,0713.1411

52

The Last Supper

Luis Antonio Planes
Pen and brown ink, brown wash over black chalk, 356 x 247 mm
c. 1802 - 1804
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1946,0713.1507

53

Design for the Decoration of the Main Chapel of the Church of the Monastery of San Juan de la Penitencia in Orihuela

Antonio Villanueva
Pen and grey ink and grey wash, 524 x 356 mm
c. 1780
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1946,0713.1519

54

Exaltation of Saint Francis of Assisi

Teodoro Ardemans
Pen and brown ink and grey wash over black chalk, 477 x 324 mm
c. 1700 - 1726
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.175

55

Design for a Diploma with Putti playing Musical Instruments

Matías Antonio de Irala Yuso
Pen and brown ink and grey wash over black chalk, 286 x 189 mm
c. 1730 - 1739
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.167

56

A View of Toledo

Anonymous 18th century
Black chalk and grey wash, 273 x 420 mm
c. 1750 - 1760
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1846,0509.177

57

Isabella Farnesio

Miguel Jacinto Meléndez
Black chalk and brown wash, 195 x 128 mm
c. 1714 - 1720
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1890,1209.48

58

A Masked Ball at the Coliseo del Príncipe

Luis Paret y Alcázar
Pen and grey ink and grey wash over black chalk, 304 x 492 mm
c. 1767
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1890,1209.50

59

Maria Luisa of Parma

Luis Paret y Alcázar
Pen and grey ink and grey wash over black chalk, 350 x 243 mm
c. 1766 - 1768
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1890,1209.49

60

Portrait of a Woman

Antonio González Velázquez
Pen and brown ink, brown and grey wash over black chalk, 230 x 158 mm
1781
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1998,0214.4

61

Saint Vincent Ferrer preaching

José Camarón y Boronat
Brush and grey and brown wash over black chalk, 205 x 151 mm
c. 1752 - 1760
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1973,0120.5

62

An Oriental Woman seated beneath a Canopy

José Camarón y Boronat
Brush and grey ink and wash, 214 x 149 mm
c. 1771 - 1780
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1973,0120.4

63

The Sultana taking Coffe

Jacques Firmin Beauvarlet
Engraving and etching, 480 x 368 mm
c. 1771
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1917,1208.2094

64

The Garrotted Man

Francisco de Goya
Pen and brown ink, 264 x 200 mm
c. 1778
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1850,0713.11

65

The Garrotted Man

Francisco Goya
Etching, 327 x 211 mm
c. 1778
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1875,0612.95

66

Pedro Roldán

Francisco de Goya
Red chalk over black chalk, 173 x 126 mm
1798 - 1799
© The Trustees of the British Museum 2007,7077.4

67

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Francisco de Goya
Red chalk over black chalk and graphite, 235 x 177 mm
1812
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1862,0712.185

68

Don Quijote Beset by Monsters

Francisco de Goya
Brush drawing in grey-brown ink and wash, 207 x 144 mm
c. 1812 - 1820
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1862,0712.188

69

For having Jewish Ancestry

Francisco de Goya
Brush drawing in brown ink and wash, 205 x 142 mm
c. 1808 - 1814
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1862,0712.18

70

Inferno

Francisco de Goya
Lithographic ink wash, 154 x 232 mm
c. 1818 – 1819
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1876,0510.374

71

Lunatics

Francisco de Goya
Black chalk and crayon, 191 x 144 mm
c. 1825 – 1828
© The Trustees of the British Museum 1980,0628.56

72

a) The Siege of Rheinfelden

Vicente Carducho
Oil on canvas, 297 x 357 cm
1634
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

73

b) A Masked Ball

Luis Paret y Alcázar
Oil on panel, 40 x 51 cm
c. 1766
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

Activities

Print on demand

Print artworks available in our catalogue in high quality and your preferred size and finish.

Image archive

Request artworks available in our catalogue in digital format.

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