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Fra Angelico and the Rise of the Florentine Renaissance

Museo Nacional del Prado. Madrid 5/28/2019 - 9/15/2019

Fra Angelico and the Rise of the Florentine Renaissance, an exhibition sponsored by the Fundación Amigos del Museo del Prado, analyses the artistic importance of the early Florentine Renaissance between approximately 1420 to 1430, with a particular focus on the figure of Fra Angelico, one of the great masters of this period.

The exhibition, which includes 82 works loaned by more than 40 institutions in Europe and America, centres on The Annunciation in the collection of the Museo del Prado, which is now presented in all its splendour following its recent restoration. Shown alongside it are The Virgin of the Pomegranate, which recently entered the Museum’s collection, and an extensive group of works by the artist and by other painters of this period such as Masaccio, Masolino and Filippo Lippi, as well as sculptors including Donatello and Ghiberti.

Curated by Carl Brandon Strehlke, Curator Emeritus at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and a renowned expert on Fra Angelico and other Florentine Renaissance painters, the exhibition is on display in Rooms C and D of the Jerónimos Building until 15 September.

Fra Angelico trained as a painter in Florence where the public commissions for sculpture and architecture undertaken by Brunelleschi, Donatello and Ghiberti led to a renewed interest in classical antiquity as a source of inspiration. Although he was an apprentice in the studio of the Benedictine monk Lorenzo Monaco, who cultivated a refined and elegant Gothic style, Fra Angelico fully committed himself to the new artistic language and, like his master, entered a religious house, San Domenico in Fiesole, where he took religious orders. His status as a monk did not prevent him from collaborating with other artists or from running a large workshop that provided paintings for both churches and important patrons in the city and elsewhere.

Among the altarpieces painted by the artist for his own monastery was The Annunciation now in the Museo del Prado and the centrepiece of the present exhibition. In that work Fra Angelico reveals his active participation in the renaissance of the arts that was taking place in Florence, given that alongside the younger Masaccio he formulated a new way of seeing which would come to dominate Western art until the modern age.

Dating from the mid-1420s, The Annunciation is the first Florentine altarpiece in the Renaissance style to use perspective to organise the space and in which Gothic arcading is abandoned in favour of a more orthogonal structure, following the precepts favoured by Brunelleschi. Due to his status as a monk, Fra Angelico’s abilities in the depiction of light, space, perspective and narrative have often been eclipsed by his merits as a theological painter.

The Annunciation arrived in Spain in 1611 and was probably the first work by the artist to leave Italy, while The Virgin of the Pomegranate was acquired in 1817 by the 1st Duke of Alba at a time when the importance of the early Florentine Renaissance was being rediscovered. Two accounts thus overlap in the exhibition: Florence as seen by Fra Angelico and Fra Angelico viewed through Spanish eyes.

Curator:
Carl Brandon Strehlke (Curator Emeritus, Philadelphia Museum of Art)

Access

Room C and D. Jerónimos Building

Sponsored by:
Fundación Amigos del Museo del Prado

Multimedia

Exhibition

Room 1

The exact date of birth of Fra Angelico (whose real name was Guido di Pietro) is not known. Around 1408-10 he entered Lorenzo Monaco’s workshop as an apprentice, soon learning to imitate the elegant Gothic style of his master, which Monaco had in turn acquired from Agnolo Gaddi. At this period, during which he became Monaco’s most valuable assistant, Florentine painting (including the work of Starnina, who had worked in Spain for around twelve years) was undergoing a process of change due to the influence of the project on which Ghiberti was currently working, namely the bronze reliefs for the Baptistery doors. The moment when Fra Angelico became an independent painter is recorded in a document of 1417 which notes his affiliation with a religious confraternity as a professional painter. There are also some indications that he set up his own workshop before taking religious orders around 1420 in the monastery San Domenico in Fiesole, adopting the religious name of Fra Giovanni. The name “Fra Angelico” was attached to him after his death due to his fame as a religious painter.

Room 2

Room 2
Stories of the Desert Fathers
Fra Angelico
Tempera and gold on panel, 75 x 207 cm
c. 1419 - 1420
Florence, Gallerie degli Uffizi

In the early decades of the 15th century Florence was a flourishing centre for new public art. Ghiberti was working on the Baptistery doors and Brunelleschi on the dome of the cathedral, while there were also projects for the Ospedale degli Innocenti and the church of San Lorenzo. Monumental sculpture now dominated spaces in the cathedral, on the bell tower and on Orsanmichele. The positive response that these projects aroused is illustrated here in the terracotta reliefs by Donatello which were made for private homes. Fra Angelico was fully aware of what was taking place around him and his first independent paintings on the subject of the Virgin and Child indicate that he had studied those works. In addition, his depiction of The Lives of the Desert Fathers offers a reinterpretation of another earlier painting that was probably in Santa Maria Novella where the new pope, Martin V, lived for a year, thus making Florence a truly international centre for the arts and humanist studies.

Room 3

Influenced by the new vitality of religious life in Italy under the papacy of Martin V, who unified the Church after decades of rival popes, Fra Angelico entered the reformist Dominican monastery in Fiesole. It is possible that he painted the five panels for the predella of the principal altarpiece of its church once he had completed his novitiate, during which he had to memorise the Psalms and other liturgical texts. However, the new monk did not lose touch with the Florentine art world. He knew that in the late 1420s Italy’s most famous painter, Gentile da Fabriano, had arrived in Florence; an artist whose soft flesh tones, delicate, ornamental use of gold and interest in the fall of light on figures and objects had a profound influence on him. He also profited from his conversations with Lorenzo Ghiberti, who stated in his autobiography that Fra Angelico supplied painters with models in wax and clay.

Room 4

Room 4
Coronation of the Virgin, with the Adoration of the Christ Child and Six Angels
Fra Angelico
Tempera and gold on panel, 77 x 43 cm
c. 1429-31
Florence, Polo Museale della Toscana, Museo di San Marco

Florence’s wealth derived from banking and its textile industry. Painters quickly responded to the new Florentine velvets with their gold and silver thread that were exported across Europe and it was above all Fra Angelico and Masaccio who depicted them in their works. At the same time, in the 1420s, colour appeared in sculpture while the lively interaction between the Virgin and Child became more evident with the use of polychromy on terracotta reliefs.

Room 5

Room 5
Annunciation and Expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden
Fra Angelico
Tempera and gold on panel, 190.3 x 191.5 cm
c. 1425-1426
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

The Annunciation altarpiece in the Prado, one of the three that Fra Angelico painted for San Domenico in Fiesole, was installed in the rood screen (the architectural element to the left of the altar) which divided the monks’ area from that of the laity. In the exhibition the principal panel and the predella, comprising five scenes, are displayed separately. They are accompanied by other works of around the same date, including the vigorous Saint Paul by Fra Angelico’s contemporary Masaccio with whom he constantly exchanged ideas. In Robert Campin’s Annunciation, an example from northern Europe, architectural symbolism is used to indicate the transition from the Hebrew Law to the advent of Christianity. Just as Campin made use of the Gothic buildings of his time, for the Virgin’s house Fra Angelico looked to contemporary Florentine architecture. In addition, he precisely depicted the plants in the garden which bring to mind late medieval botanical texts. Fra Angelico’s altarpiece was located at the centre of the daily liturgical ceremonies, like the one to be seen in Berruguete’s painting on the apparition of the Virgin to a Dominican community.

Room 6

Renaissance Florence was notably theatrical in nature. Painters responded to the daily spectacle of its religious processions, rituals and representations, devising their compositions as if directing actors on stage. On occasions paintings were used as backdrops for ceremonies. The reliquary of The Coronation of the Virgin painted by Fra Angelico was carried to the high altar of Santa Maria Novella in the major festivals. The large Crucifixion group in silhouette was executed for an organisation of young people who recited prayers before it. In the late 1430s Fra Angelico painted a series of scenes, all of a similar type, for the monks’ cells in the reformist Dominican monastery of San Marco.

Room 7

Room 7
Christ on the Cross
Pedro Berruguete
Oil on panel, 191 x 136 cm
c. 1493-1498
Segovia, Diputación de Segovia

Some of the works on display in this room demonstrate Fra Angelico’s outstanding powers as a narrative painter. However, as other works reveal, his subsequent reputation was largely based on his ability to create images charged with profound religious sentiment. It was this aspect of his art that other painters attempted to emulate, including the Italian Antoniazzo Romano and the Spaniard Pedro Berruguete in the late 15th century. The tapestry from Zaragoza cathedral was made in the manufactory established in the Vatican by Pope Nicholas V, one of Fra Angelico’s most important patrons. The weavers from northern Europe employed all their technical knowledge to translate the artist’s ideas into textile. This tapestry was acquired by a Spanish cleric in Rome.

Fra Angelico

Vicchio di Mugello, Florence, ca. 1395 - Rome, 1455

At an unknown date Guido di Pietro moved to Florence with his brother Benedetto and both entered the manuscript workshop of the parish church of San Michele Visdomini. Benedetto trained as a copyist and Guido as an illuminator, explaining his subsequent mastery in small-format works. In 1417 he is recorded as a painter and Florentine citizen in the confraternity of Saint Nicholas of Bari, and in 1418 he was paid for a now lost altarpiece for Santo Stefano al Ponte in Florence. By 1423 he had already taken orders as a Dominican in the Observant monastery of San Domenico in Fiesole and had assumed the religious name of Fra Giovanni da Fiesole.

The name of Fra Angelico with which he has passed down to history first appeared fourteen years after his death. It refers to his profound spirituality, which was notably emphasised by his first biographer, Antonio Manetti, around 1494-97. Between 1420 and 1432 Fra Angelico combined his activities as an illuminator (Missal, Ms. 558, Museo di San Marco, Florence) with altar paintings for San Domenico and other houses of the Order, works that employ an exquisite, delicate miniaturist’s technique, as in The Annunciation (Museo del Prado) and The Coronation of the Virgin (Musée du Louvre, Paris). Created at a key moment in Florentine art, these works reveal an assimilation of a range of very diverse influences, from the International Gothic of Lorenzo Monaco, with whom Fra Angelico first trained, to Masaccio’s “revolutionary” art and including Gentile da Fabriano’s elegant and refined artifice. The year 1432 marked a turning point in his career when he painted a triptych for the Arte de’Linaiuoli with a large central panel of The Virgin and Child enthroned (Museo di San Marco, Florence). Completed in 1436, this triptych marks Fra Angelico’s artistic maturity and his firm adherence to the most advanced artistic ideas, interestingly represented by artists of the previous generation, and the work’s approach to space and the monumentality of the figures is in fact closer to Masaccio (who died in 1428) and to sculptors such as Ghiberti (1378-1455) than to contemporaries of Fra Angelico. The Linaiuoli Triptych aroused the interest of two powerful and rival patrons: Palla Strozzi, for whom the artist painted a Deposition (Museo di San Marco, Florence), and Cosimo de’Medici, who commissioned the decoration of the monastery of San Marco in Florence, a colossal project that the artist executed between 1440 and 1445 and which encompassed both the altars and the fresco painting of the building’s principal rooms, including those for 44 cells. This enormous undertaking was only possible due to the existence (already evident in the early 1430s) of a large and well-organised workshop, the members of which included Benozzo Gozzoli, Fra Angelico’s most outstanding pupil.

With the election of Antonio Pierozzi, former prior of San Marco, as Pope Eugenius IV in 1446, Fra Angelico moved to Rome and remained there for four years to paint in the Vatican. Only one of these Roman projects has survived: the fresco cycle on the lives of Saint Stephen and Saint Lawrence in Nicholas V’s private chapel (1448-49), a work that reveals the artist’s profound assimilation of Masaccio in the Brancacci chapel (Santa Maria del Carmine, Florence). After a brief period in Orvieto, in 1450 Fra Angelico returned to Florence to become prior of San Domenico in Fiesole and once more worked for Cosimo and Piero de’Medici. His last commission was for the lost fresco decoration of the cloister of Santa Maria sopra Minerva, the principal Dominican house in Rome, where he followed an iconographic programme devised by Friar Juan de Torquemada, whom Fra Angelico had known since that Spanish prelate’s time in Florence in the 1430s. (Falomir, M.: Enciclopedia Museo Nacional del Prado, 2006, vol. II, pp.383-84).

Artworks

1

Capital of a pilaster

Florentine stonemason

Gray sandstone, 88 x 114 cm

1440s

Florence, Polo Museale della Toscana, Museo di San Marc

2

The Young Saint Anthony Abbot Meets a Hermit outside his City

Attributed to Fra Angelico in the workshop of Lorenzo Monaco

Tempera and gold on panel, 22.3 x 24.6 cm

c. 1411–14

Ciudad del Vaticano, Musei Vaticani

3

Virgin and Child Enthroned, with Saints Anthony Abbot or Romualdo, John the Baptist, Peter, and Paul, and Christ as Man of Sorrows with the Mourning Virgin and John the Evangelist

Fra Angelico in the workshop of Lorenzo Monaco

Tempera and gold on panel, 43 x 22 cm

c. 1411–12

The San Diego Museum of Art. Gift of Anne R. and Amy Putnam, inv.1946.18

4

Saint Paula

Ambrogio di Baldese

Tempera and gold on panel, 94 x 35 cm

c. 1405–10

Ciudad del Vaticano, Musei Vaticani

5

Saint Eustochium

Ambrogio di Baldese

Tempera and gold on panel, 95 x 36 cm

c. 1405–10

Ciudad del Vaticano, Musei Vaticani

6

The Miracle of the Loaves and Fishes in the Initial L

Lorenzo Monaco possibly with Fra Angelico

Pen and ink on parchment, 31.6  x 23.1 cm

1410-12

Copenhaguen, Statens Museum for Kunst

7

Christ Washing the Feet of the Apostles in the Initial D

Lorenzo Monaco possibly with Fra Angelico

Pen and ink on parchment, 29.6 x 23.5 cm

1410-12

Copenhaguen, Statens Museum for Kunst

8

Virgin and Child Enthroned, with Six Angels

Lorenzo Monaco

Tempera and gold on panel, 147.3 x 82 cm

c. 1420

Barcelona, Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya. Colección Thyssen-Bornemisza en depósito en el MNAC, 2004

9

Altarpiece of Bonifacio Ferrer

Gherardo Starnina

Tempera and gold on panel, 31 x 189 cm

1396–97

Museo de Bellas Artes de Valencia

10

Saint Eligius in his Goldsmith’s Workshop

Master of the Misericordia Giovanni Gaddi (?)

Tempera and gold on panel, 35 x 39 cm

c. 1370

Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

11

Creation of Eve

Donatello

Glazed terracota with traces of gilding, 34.5 x 34.5 cm

c. 1406–08

Florence, Museo dell’Opera del Duomo

12

Saint Michael Archangel Makes the Sea Withdraw to Leave a Passage for a Woman who Gave Birth on a Pilgrimage to Mont Saint Michel and Saint Michael Archangel and the Bull of Monte Gargano

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 42.2 x 90.5 cm

c. 1417

New Haven, Yale University Art Gallery. Bequest of Maitland F. Griggs, B.A. 1896

13

Virgin and Child, with Four Angels

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 81 x 51 cm

c. 1417–19

Saint Petersburg, The State Hermitage Museum

14

Virgin and Child Enthroned, with Two Angels

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 80.5 x 47 cm

c. 1420

Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen

15

Stories of the Desert Fathers

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 75 x 207 cm

c. 1419–20

Florence, Gallerie degli Uffizi

16

Crucifixion

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 63.8 x 48.3 cm

c. 1418–20

New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Maitland F. Griggs Collection, Bequest of Maitland F. Griggs, 1943, inv. 43.98.5

17

Virgin and Child Enthroned, with Two Angels and Two Prophets

Donatello

Terracotta, 96.5 x  68 x 14 cm

c. 1420

Prato, Museo di Palazzo Pretorio

18

Nativity of Christ and Annunciation to the Shepherds

Donatello

Terracotta with traces of polychrome and gilding, 47 x 35.6 x 8.3 cm

c. 1415–20

Detroit Institute of Arts. Bequest of Eleanor Clay Ford

 

19

Saint Stephen

Possibly workshop of Fra Angelico for Lorenzo Ghiberti

Tempera and gold on linen, 69.8 x 30.5 cm

c. 1425–27

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des Arts Graphiques

20

Virgin and Child, with Twelve Angels

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 37.5 x 29.7 cm

c. 1421–22

Frankfurt, Städel Museum

21

Saint Nicholas of Bari. Panels from the San Domenico High Altarpiece in Fiesole

Fra Angelico

Tempera, silver and gold on poplar panel, 41 x 15.5 cm

c. 1419 and c. 1421–22

Remagen, Arp Museum Bahnhof Rolandseck. Sammlung Rau für Unicef

22

Saint Michael Archangel. Panels from the San Domenico High Altarpiece in Fiesole

Fra Angelico

Tempera, silver and gold on panel, 41 x 15.5 cm

c. 1419 and c. 1421–22

Remagen, Arp Museum Bahnhof Rolandseck. Sammlung Rau für Unicef

23

Saint Alexander. Panels from the San Domenico High Altarpiece in Fiesole

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 15.9 x 15.6 cm

c. 1419 and c. 1421–22

New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Lucy G. Moses, 1990, 1991.27.2

24

Saint Romulus. Panels from the San Domenico High Altarpiece in Fiesole

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 16 x 15.6 cm

c. 1419 and c. 1421–22

London, The National Gallery. Bequeathed by Lady Lindsay, 1912

25

The Virgin Mary with the Apostles, Doctors of the Church and Monastic Saints. Panels from the San Domenico High Altarpiece in Fiesole

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel

c. 1419 and c. 1421–22

London, The National Gallery- Bought. 1860

26

Christ Glorified. Panels from the San Domenico High Altarpiece in Fiesole

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel

c. 1419 and c. 1421–22

London, The National Gallery- Bought. 1860

27

The Forerunners of Christ (Patriarchs and Prophets) with Martyrs and the Virgins. Panels from the San Domenico High Altarpiece in Fiesole

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel

c. 1419 and c. 1421–22

London, The National Gallery- Bought. 1860

28

Eighteen Blessed of the Dominican Order. Panels from the San Domenico High Altarpiece in Fiesole

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel

c. 1419 and c. 1421–22

London, The National Gallery- Bought. 1860

29

Seventeen Blessed of the Dominican Order and Two Dominican Tertiaries. Panels from the San Domenico High Altarpiece in Fiesole

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel

c. 1419 and c. 1421–22

London, The National Gallery- Bought. 1860

30

The Annunciate Archangel Gabriel. Panels from the San Domenico High Altarpiece in Fiesole

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 25.2 cm

c. 1419 and c. 1421–22

Private Collection

31

The Virgin Annunciate. Panels from the San Domenico High Altarpiece in Fiesole

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 25.6 cm

c. 1419 and c. 1421–22

Private Collection

32

Presentation of Jesus in the Temple

Gentile da Fabriano

Tempera and gold on panel, 26.5 x 62.5 cm

1423

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des Peintures

33

Virgin and Child

Gentile da Fabriano

Tempera and gold on panel, 91.8 x 62.8 cm

c. 1420–23

New Haven, Yale University Art Gallery. University Purchase from James Jackson Jarves

34

The Blessed Margaret of Hungary and Saint Cecilia (?)

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 20.6 x 50 cm

c. 1421-22

London, The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery

35

Saint Mary Magdalene, Christ as the Man of Sorrows, and John the Evangelist

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 21 x 50  cm

c. 1421-22

London, The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery 

36

Saints Catherine of Alexandria and Agnes

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 21 x 51.3 cm

c. 1421-22

London, The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery

 

37

Saint Andrew

Workshop of Lorenzo Ghiberti

Gilt bronze, 20 cm

1415–20

Città di Castello, Pinacoteca Comunale

38

Saint Francis of Assisi

Workshop of Lorenzo Ghiberti

Gilt bronze, 20 cm

1415–20

Città di Castello, Pinacoteca Comunale

39

Carlos Miguel Fitz-James Stuart y Silva, 7th Duke of Berwick, 12th Duke of Huéscar and 14th Duke of Alba

Lorenzo Bartolini

Carrara marble, 73 x 57 x 32 cm

c. 1818–20

Madrid, Fundación Casa de Alba

41

Virgin of the Pomegranate

Donatello

Polychromed terracotta, 90 x 64 x 28 cm

c. 1420–25

Florence, Musei Civici Fiorentini, Museo Stefano Bardini

42

Virgin of Humility, with Five Angels

Fra Angelico

Tempera, silver and gold on panel, 98.6 x 49.2 cm

c. 1425

Barcelona, Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya. Colección Thyssen-Bornemisza en depósito en el MNAC, 2004

43

Virgin and Child, with Cherub

Michele da Firenze

Polychromed and gilt terracotta, 129  x 71 x 22 cm

c. 1424–27

Florence, Museo Nazionale del Bargello

44

Saint Julian the Hospitaller

Masolino

Tempera, oil, silver and gold on panel, 135 x 53.5 cm

c. 1423–25

Florence, Archidiócesis de Florencia, Museo Diocesano di Santo Stefano al Ponte. Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio per la città metropolitana di Firenze e le province di Pistoia e Prato

45

Length of velvet with the Medici palle

Florentine Manufactory

Silk and metal wrapped thread, 119 x 39 cm

c. 1450–75

Florence, Museo Nazionale del Bargello

46

Length velvet with floral motif

Florentine manufactory

Silk and metal wrapped thread, 47 x 28.5 cm

c. 1440–60

Florence, Museo Nazionale del Bargello

47

Dalmatic with embroidered apparels

Venetian (dalmatic) and Florentine (apparels) manufactories

Silk (dalmatic) and silk and metal wrapped thread (apparels), 129 x 108 cm | 26 x 26.5 cm

c. 1430–50

Florence, Museo Nazionale del Bargello

49

Birth and Marriage of the Virgin, Visitation, Nativity of Christ, Presentation of Jesus in the Temple, and Dormition of the Virgin

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 28 x 189.3 cm

c. 1425–26

Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

50

Corbel Capital

Florentine stonemason

Gray sandstone, 47 x 38 cm

1460s

Florence, Polo Museale della Toscana, Museo di San Marco

52

Saint Paul

Masaccio

Tempera, silver and gold on poplar panel, 60 x 35 cm

1426

Pisa, Polo Museale della Toscana, Museo Nazionale di San Matteo

53

Taddeo di Gaddo, Gaddo di Zanobi and Agnolo di Taddeo

Workshop of Fra Angelico

Tempera on panel, 47 x 89 cm

c. 1425–30

Florence, Gallerie degli Uffizi

55

The Sour Pomegranate (Granata acetosa). In Abū al-Hasan al-Mukhtar Ibn Buțlān, Theatrum sanitatis, fol. VIII

School of Giovannino de' Grassi

Tempera on vellum, 34.5 x 24.2 cm

c. 1390–1410

Rome, Biblioteca Casanatense

56

Head and Torso of Saint Francis of Assisi

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 66.7 x 36.8 cm

c. 1427–30

Philadelphia Museum of Art. John G. Johnson Collection, 1917

57

Christ on the Cross with Saints Nicholas of Bari and Francis of Assisi

Fra Angelico

Tempera, silver and gold on panel, 277 x 208 cm

c. 1427–30

Florence, Compagnia del Ceppo. Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio per la città metropolitana di Firenze e le province di Pistoia e Prato

58

Coronation of the Virgin, with the Adoration of the Christ Child and Six Angels

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 77 x 43 cm

c. 1429-31

Florence, Polo Museale della Toscana, Museo di San Marco

59

Saint James the Great Freeing the Magician Hermogenes

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 47.3 x 44.3 cm

c. 1427–28

Fort Worth, Tx., Kimbell Art Museum

60

The Vision of Saint Lucy

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 25.1 x 21.5 cm

c. 1427–28

New York, The Richard L. Feigen Collection

61

Saint Julian the Hospitaller Tricked by the Devil Kills his Parents

Masolino

Tempera and gold on panel, 21 x 39 cm

c. 1427–30

Montauban, Musée Ingres, inv. 867.107

62

Five Studies of a Flagellant

Attributed to Masolino

Ink and pen on paper, 21.6 x 16.6 cm

c. 1427–30

Vienna, The Albertina Museum

63

Annunciation

Paolo Uccello

Tempera and gold on panel, 65 x 48 cm

c. 1424-25

Oxford, University of Oxford, The Ashmolean Museum. Fox-Strangways Gift, 1850

64

Virgin and Child, Saints, Angels and a Donor Greeted by an Angel

Filipo Lippi

Tempera and gold on panel, 47.1 x 36 cm

c. 1430–35

Venice, Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Galleria di Palazzo Cini

65

The Archangel Gabriel

Masolino

Tempera and gold on panel, 76.6 x 57.8 cm

c. 1428–34

Washington, D. C., National Gallery of Art. Samuel H. Kress Collection, inv. 1939.1.225 y 1939.1.226

66

The Virgin Annunciate

Masolino

Tempera and gold on panel, 76 x 57 cm

c. 1428–34

Washington, D. C., National Gallery of Art. Samuel H. Kress Collection, inv. 1939.1.225 y 1939.1.226

67

The Dead Christ

Fra Angelico

Medium brown ink, brown wash, red wash, and lead white on paper, 76 x 57 cm

c. 1432

Cambridge, The Syndics of The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

68

Christ on the Cross

Pedro Berruguete

Oil on panel, 191 x 136 cm

c. 1493–98

Segovia, Diputación de Segovia

69

The Funeral of Saint Anthony Abbot

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 19.7 x 29.3 cm

c. 1430–35

Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado. Donación de Carlos Fitz-James Stuart y Martínez de Irujo, XIX duque de Alba, 2016

70

Saint Anthony Abbot Shunning a Mass of Gold

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 19.7 x 28.1 cm

c. 1430–35

Houston, The Museum of Fine Arts. The Edith A. and Percy S. Straus Collection, 44.550

71

Marriage of the Virgin

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 19 x 50 cm

c. 1435–40

Florence, Polo Museale della Toscana, Museo di San Marco

72

Dormition of the Virgin

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 19 x 50 cm

c. 1435–40

Florence, Polo Museale della Toscana, Museo di San Marco

73

Christ the Saviour

Antoniazzo Romano

Tempera and gold on panels, 87 x 62 cm

c. 1491–95

Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

74

Saints John the Baptist and Peter

Antoniazzo Romano

Tempera and gold on panels, 94 x 35 cm

c. 1491–95

Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

75

Saints John the Evangelist and Columba

Antoniazzo Romano

Tempera and gold on panels, 94 x 35 cm

c. 1491–95

Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

76

Birth of Saint Nicholas of Bari, Vocation of the Saint, and Charity of the Saint

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 35 x 61.5 cm

c. 1437–38

Ciudad del Vaticano, Musei Vaticani

77

Crucifixion with the Virgin Mary and Saint John the Evangelist

Roman tapestry manufactory after a design from the workshop of Fra Angelico

Wool, silk and gold thread, 212 x 125 cm

c. 1455

Zaragoza, Excmo. Cabildo Metropolitano de Zaragoza. Catedral del Salvador (La Seo). Museo de Tapices

78

Virgin and Child, with Four Angels

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 16.2 x 9.8 cm

c. 1430

Detroit Institute of Arts. Founders Society Purchase, Ralph Harman Booth Bequest Fund

79

Saint Dominic and the Stigmatization of Saint Francis of Assisi

Fra Angelico

Tempera and gold on panel, 15.6 x 9.7 cm

c. 1430

Newark, Delaware, The Alana Collection

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