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Late Raphael

12.06.2012 - 16.09.2012

Late Raphael, is one of the most important exhibitions ever to be devoted to the artist and his studio and the first to focus on his final years, during which time Raphael became the most influential painter in Western art. The exhibition includes a total of 74 works, the majority of them never previously exhibited in Spain. It presents a chronological survey of Raphael’s artistic activities from the start of the pontificate of Leo X (1513) to the artist’s death in 1520, as well as analyze the activities of his principal assistants, Giulio Romano and Gianfrancesco Penni, up to 1524.

Late Raphael is the first major survey exhibition on Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio, 1483-1520) to combine paintings and drawings in order to focus on the last seven years of the life of the artist, who died in Rome on his 37th birthday. This was the period in his career when Raphael produced the work that would have the greatest subsequent impact on European art. Nonetheless, his paintings have not been fully understood due to chronological issues, to their disconcerting diversity and because the artist did not work by himself.The present exhibition aims to establish a clear definition of the boundaries between works executed by Raphael and those produced with the collaboration of his principal assistants, Giulio Romano (ca.1499-1546) and Gianfrancesco Penni (ca.1496-1528). It starts in 1513 by which date Raphael had been working in Rome for five years, decorating the monumental Vatican Stanze alongside other leading Italian artists such as Michelangelo (his principal rival, at that point working on the Sistine Chapel) and Sebastiano del Piombo, firstly during the pontificate of Julius II then for Leo X.

With the change of pope Raphael took on a greater number of commissions both for Leo X and for other patrons and at this point began to employ a considerable number of assistants. His studio was very possibly the largest to date under the direction of a single great painter and eventually counted on 50 pupils and assistants./p>The exhibition presents the visitor with the highly efficient and effective results of this system, led by the remarkably versatile Raphael. In addition to producing easel paintings (the subject of this exhibition) he also executed frescoes such as those for the Vatican Stanze and for the Villa Farnesina, cartoons for tapestries (for the Sistine Chapel), and worked as an architect (continuing the construction of St Peter’s after Bramante’s death).The exhibition includes an unprecedented selection of forty-four paintings, twenty eight drawings, an archaeological item and a tapestry, loaned from around forty different institutions. Visitors can see a chronologically structured survey organised into six sections that cover Raphael’s pictorial and aesthetic evolution and also presents a comparison of his final style with a group of works by his two assistants Romano and Penni, the latter produced both during Raphael’s lifetime and immediately after his death. This unprecedented opportunity for comparison allow for an identification of the degree of participation of Raphael and his assistants in these works while also helps to establish the latter’s intellectual and aesthetic contribution to Raphael’s oeuvre.

In this regard the almost thirty drawings that are displayed alongside the paintings play a key role in helping to identify Raphael’s hand, not only due to their absolute mastery but also because they reveal the original design and conception of his paintings.Among the most outstanding works that have travelled to Spain for the first time are the serene portrait of one of the artist’s friends, Baldassare Castiglione (1519), loaned from the Louvre, and the major altar painting of Saint Cecilia (1515-1516) loaned from the Pinacoteca Nazionale de Bolonia in which the viewer can appreciate the remarkable beauty of the figures and their perfect, harmonious composition, a level of achievement that Raphael attained during his time in Rome.

Also remarkable are the paintings from Raphael’s late period in the Prado’s own collection, including the panel transferred to canvas known as Lo Spasimo di Sicilia (1515-1516), which is on display for the first time since its restoration.

Curator:
Paul Joannides (Cambridge University) and Tom Henry (independent scholar)

Access

Room Rooms A and B of the Jerónimos Building and Room 49 of the Villanueva Building. The Jerónimos and the Villanueva Buildings

Opening time

Monday to Saturday from 10am to 8pm. Sunday and holidays from 10am to 7pm

Supported by:
Fundación Axa
Organized by:
Museo del Louvre
Museo Nacional del Prado

Multimedia

Exhibition

Raphael’s Altarpieces

Raphael’s Altarpieces
Santa Cecilia
Raphael
Oil on panel transferred to canvas, 236 x 149 cm
ca. 1515 - 1516
Bolonia, Pinacoteca Nazionale

The altarpieces that Raphael produced in Rome during Leo’s X’s papacy were all intended for export: to Naples, Palermo, Bologna, and France. They were executed for patrons at the highest level (such as King Francis I of France), or with excellent connections, and they served to spread the artist’s fame across Europe. Although most of these altarpieces were signed raphael urbinas (Raphael from Urbino) despite their role in publicising the artist’s name abroad they frequently involved significant amounts of workshop assistance and sometimes were even assigned entirely to an assistant.

Only the Madonna del Pesce is a traditional Virgin and Child flanked by saints. All the others, with the exception of the Santa Cecilia, are narrative compositions in which Raphael endeavoured to recast the traditional altarpiece in the dramatic new idiom that he was simultaneously bringing to fresco and tapestry design. The cross-over with other media is especially clear in the Vision of Ezekiel, the painted version of which is very small but which was apparently developed while planning a large-scale narrative tapestry for Leo X (recently acquired by the Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid). The small panel and the tapestry will be show together for the first time.

Large Madonnas and Holy Families

Large Madonnas and Holy Families
The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne and the Baptist (The Perla)
Raphael
Oil on panel, 147.4 x 116 cm
1519 - 1520
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

Raphael’s repertory in Rome included a few large paintings of the Madonna and Child, but many more variants on the subject of the Holy Family with the addition of Saint Joseph and sometimes also Saint Anne and the young Saint John the Baptist. The distinction between these larger panels and altarpieces is not always clear and some of the Holy Families were probably installed as altarpieces in private chapels; they could also have been displayed in private residences.

There is much uncertainty regarding the dating of these pictures and the extent to which Raphael’s assistants participated in their execution and planning; although some, such as the Perla, are among his greatest masterpieces. Throughout the period Raphael was under extreme pressure and he often delegated aspects of his work to his shop and especially to his two most trusted assistants, Giulio Romano and Gianfrancesco Penni. However he generally kept firm control of his workshop’s production, at least in the pictures which went out under his name, even if the times and ways in which he delegated were not always straight-forward.

Small Madonnas and Holy Families

Small Madonnas and Holy Families
Visitor contemplating the exhibition

Raphael had even less time for the production of smaller, less important, compositions of the Madonna and Child and smaller Holy Families. As a result, it is in these pictures that one can first identify and best appreciate the individual contributions of Giulio Romano and Gianfrancesco Penni. In addition to producing work in Raphael’s name, such as the Small Holy Family and its cover which was painted for one of Raphael’s closest and most influential patrons, Cardinal Bibbiena, Raphael’s young assistants began to paint pictures which, while frequently based on or assembled from Raphaelesque motives, do not seem to have originated directly with the master but instead represent independent productions. These presage their work after the master’s unexpected death in 1520.

This section opens with Giulio’s independent work on this scale and within this category produced during Raphael’s life-time. It continues on the end and facing walls with Penni’s independent work both before and after Raphael’s death. It shows the individual characters and limitations of these young artists, and allows one to better appreciate their roles in the larger collaborative works in this exhibition.

Giulio Romano

Giulio Romano
Cartoon for The Stoning of Saint Stephen
Giulio Romano
Charcoal and black chalk on paper, mounted on canvas, 411 x 285 cm
1520 - 1521
Vatican City, Musei Vaticani

Giulio’s earliest independent activity was encountered in the previous section, and his work as Raphael’s principal assistant can be seen in pictures throughout the other thematic sections of the exhibition. But while Penni’s independent activity producing easel pictures can be placed in the category of Small Madonnas and Holy Families, Giulio was a more ambitious and versatile painter.

The works in this section are representative of the ways in which Giulio’s work developed when it was not constrained by Raphael’s guidance. The Dëesis (Christ in Glory with Saints) from Parma was probably commissioned from Raphael, but the surface execution is entirely by Giulio. It is the picture that best represents his surface handling at the very end of Raphael’s life. The cartoon of the Stoning of Saint Stephen was made in preparation for an altarpiece in Genoa which was also apparently commissioned from Raphael but only furnished after his death, including numerous changes introduced by Giulio. The Flagellation from the church of Santa Prassede in Rome was commissioned from Giulio by Cardinal Bibbiena, although its attribution remains controversial and some scholars claim that it is a later replacement of a lost painting by Giulio in which execution Caravaggio participated.

Portraits

Portraits
Bindo Altoviti
Raphael
Oil on panel, 59,7 x 43,8 cm, h.
ca. 1516 - 1518
Washington, National Gallery of Art
Samuel H. Kress Collection 1943.4.33

Raphael transformed Renaissance portraiture, expanding the range and possibilities of the genre in ways that had not been anticipated by any other artist. His portraits can be divided into two groups: official portraits and portraits of friends. The official portraits of cardinals, the Pope, and other prestigious sitters were commissioned works, sometimes executed under intense timepressure. Some of these, or some parts of these, were delegated to Raphael’s workshop, and Raphael may not have particularly relished painting these portraits.

The second group comprises portraits that Raphael painted of his friends, perhaps as gifts and possibly without receiving payment. In these portraits, which are of the highest quality and in which workshop assistance cannot be detected, Raphael’s originality is found in the painterly execution rather than in their form. They are predominantly painted on canvas and are amongst the artist’s greatest masterpieces, especially for their exploitation of the properties of painting on a canvas support. In his Self-Portrait with Giulio Romano which was probably the last portrait that Raphael painted and which serves as his artistic testament, Raphael combined compositional inventiveness with innovative execution while also commemorating his quasi-paternal relationship with Giulio Romano.

The Transfiguration

The Transfiguration
Transfiguration
Penni, Giovanni Francesco (Copy Rafael)
Oil on panel, 396 x 263 cm
1520-1528
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

The Transfiguration was commissioned from Raphael by Cardinal Giulio de Medici, probably late in 1516, and was intended for his cathedral at Narbonne. Sebastiano del Piombo persuaded the Cardinal to commission a second, rival, altarpiece for the same location. The Transfiguration was completed just before Raphael died and was retained in Rome as a result of his unexpected death. It is now in the Musei Vaticani. Sebastiano’s picture was sent to Narbonne, and is now in the National Gallery, London. Raphael’s workshop was engaged to produce a replica of Raphael’s original, and this picture made its way to Spain in the seventeenth century. It is shown here with thirteen drawings that were produced by Raphael (and Giulio Romano) as Raphael planned the original painting and which were presumably available to Raphael’s workshop when they were working on this variant. Seventeen drawings, either originals or copies, are known for the Transfiguration and, as a result, one can trace its development in some detail. The sequence shows how Raphael realised that he could increase the drama of his picture by combining the Transfiguration with the appearance of the possessed boy to the apostles who have been left behind as Christ ascends Mount Tabor (the two episodes follow in the gospels, but no previous artist had combined them).

Artworks

2

Compositional study [for the Madonna del Pesce]

Raphael, red chalk with traces of black chalk and ruled stylus lines on paper, 26,7 x 26,3 cm

ca.1513 - 1514

Florence, Galleria degli Uffizi. Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe

3

Modello for the Madonna del Pesce

Raphael, brush, wash over black chalk heightened with white, squared in black chalk on paper, 25,8 x 21,3 cm

ca.1513 - 1514

Edinburgh, Scottish National Gallery. Purchased by Private Treaty with the aid of the Art Fund, 1993

5

Study for two horsemen

Raphael, red chalk over some stylus work on paper, 28,6 x 20,3 cm

1515 - 1516

Vienna, Albertina

6

The Madonna dei Candelabri

Raphael and workshop, oil on panel, 65,7 x 64 cm. Diam. 65,8 cm

ca. 1513 - 1514

Baltimore, The Walters Art Museum. Acquired by Henry Walters, 1901

7

Study for the Child [Madonna dei Candelabri]

Attributed to Gianfrancesco Penni, brush and wash on paper, 16 x 20,3 cm

ca.1513 - 1514

Oxford, The Ashmolean Museum. Presented by a Body of Subscribers

8

Santa Cecilia

Raphael, oil on panel transferred to canvas, 236 x 149 cm

ca.1515 - 1516

Bologna, Pinacoteca Nazionale

9

Modello for Santa Cecilia

Gianfrancesco Penni, brush, wash, white body-colour over indications in black chalk on paper; stylus framing, 27 x 16 cm

ca. 1514

Paris, Petit Palais, Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris

11

he Holy Family of Francis I, known as The Great Holy Family

Raphael and workshop (?), oil on panel, transferred to canvas, 207 x 140 cm

1518

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des peintures. Collection de François Ier

12

Cartoon fragment of Saint Elizabeth, Saint John, the Infant Christ and part of an Angel

Giulio Romano (?), black chalk and white chalk on paper, 70,6 x 52,6 cm

1518

Melbourne, National Gallery of Victoria. Bequest of Howard Spensley, 1939

13

Saint Michael, known as Great Saint Michael

Raphael and workshop (?), oil on panel, transferred to canvas, 268 x 160 cm

1518

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des peintures. Collection de François Ier

14

he Vision of Ezekiel

Giulio Romano on the basis of a design by Raphael

Oil on panel, 40,7 x 29,5 cm

1516 - 1517

Florence, Soprintendenza Speciale per il Polo Museale Fiorentino, Galleria Palatina di Palazzo Pitti

15

God the Father accompanied by Symbols of the Evangelists (The Trinity)

Manufacture by Pieter van Aelst (Brussels) after a cartoon by Tommaso Vincidor, wool, silk and silver thread, 425 x 347 cm

1521

Madrid, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas

16

Saint John in the Wilderness

Raphael (?) and workshop, oil on canvas, 163 x 147 cm

ca. 1517 - 1518

Florence, Galleria degli Uffizi

17

Study after the Saint John in the Wilderness

Gianfrancesco Penni, pen, ink, white body-colour over indications in black chalk on blue paper, 27,5 x 17,1 cm

ca.1517 - 1518

Edinburgh, Scottish National Gallery

18

The Madonna of Divine Love

Raphael and workshop (Gianfrancesco Penni?), oil on panel, 140 x 109 cm

ca. 1516

Naples, Museo di Capodimonte

20

Study for a preliminary versión of the Madonna della Rosa

According to Raphael, pen and ink with brown wash and traces of red chalk on paper, squared, 24,2 x 22,2 cm

ca.1516

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des Arts graphiques

21

The Munro of Novar Madonna

Giulio Romano, oil on panel, 82,5 x 63,2 cm

ca. 1517 - 1518

Edinburgh, Scottish National Gallery. Purchased with the aid of the National Heritage Purchase Grant (Scotland) 1980

23

Studies for The Perla

Raphael and Giulio Romano, red chalk over stylus indentation on paper (and squared with stylus on theverso), 17,3 x 9,7 cm

1519 - 1520

Berlin, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. Kupferstichkabinett

24

Study for the Virgin (The Perla)

Raphael, black chalk and white body-colour over stylus indentation on paper, 23 x 16 cm

1519 - 1520

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des Arts graphiques

26

The base of a candelabra known as the Borghese candelabra

Roman sculptor, pentelic marble,113 height x 61,5 length cm (each side)

25 BC – 25 AD

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des Antiquités grecques, étrusques et romaines

27

The Virgin and Child and Saint John (The Madonnina)

Giulio Romano, oil on panel, 29 x 25 cm

1515 - 1516

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des peintures

28

The Virgin and Child (The Wellington Madonna)

Giulio Romano, oil on panel, 50,8 x 38,8 cm

1516 - 1518

London, The Wellington Collection, Apsley House (English Heritage)

29

The Virgin and Child with Saint John

Giulio Romano, oil on panel, 126 x 85 cm

1518 (?)

Rome, Galleria Borghese

30

The Small Holy Family

Raphael and workshop (?), oil on panel, 38 x 32 cm

ca.1517 - 1518

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des peintures. Collection de Louis XIV (acquis de Loménie de Brienne vers 1663)

31

Study for the Small Holy Family

Giulio Romano, red chalk in two shades over stylus, on paper, 26,7 x 22,3 cm

1517 - 1518

The Royal Collection. Lent by Her Majesty Elizabeth II

32

Ceres / Abundance (‘Dovizia’)

Giulio Romano, oil on panel, 38 x 31 cm

ca. 1517 - 1518

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des peintures. Collection de Louis XIV (acquis de Loménie de Brienne vers 1663)

33

The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne and Saint John (version of The Small Holy Family)

Gianfrancesco Penni

Óleo sobre tabla, 40,3 x 28,9 cm

h. 1518

Colección particular

34

The Hertz Madonna

Giulio Romano, oil on canvas, 36 x 30,5 cm

1516 - 1517

Rome, Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica di Palazzo Barberini

35

Study for the Virgin and Child for The Hertz Madonna

Giulio Romano, black and white chalk over stylus indications on paper, 27,4 x 21 cm

1516 - 1517

Private collection

36

The Spinola Holy Family

Giulio Romano,

Oil on panel, 77,8 x 61,9 cm

1517 - 1518 (or later, ca.1520)

Los Angeles, The J. Paul Getty Museum

37

The Holy Family with Saint John


Gianfrancesco Penni,

Oil on panel, 76 x 53,3 cm

1516 - 1517

Dorset, Kingston Lacy, The Bankes Collection (The National Trust)

38

The Madonna of the Blue Diadem

Raphael (?) or Gianfrancesco Penni (?), oil on panel, 68 x 48 cm

ca. 1512 - 1520

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des peintures. Collection de Louis XV (acquis en 1742)

39

The Holy Family with Saint John and Saint Catherine

Gianfrancesco Penni, oil on canvas, 125 x 93,5 cm

1520 - 1522 (?)

Private collection. Lent Courtesy Childs Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts

40

Saint John the Baptist filling his Bowl in the Wilderness

Gianfrancesco Penni

Oil on panel, 65 x 48,5 cm

ca. 1516

Private collection

41

The Holy Family with a Book (The Virgin and Child with Saint Joseph)

Attributed to Gianfrancesco Penni (?)

Oil on panel, 35,4 x 24 cm

ca. 1512 - 1514

Florence, Galleria Palatina di Palazzo Pitti

42

Nativity

Gianfrancesco Penni

Oil on panel, 90 x 69 cm

1514 - 1518

Rome, Galleria Borghese

43

Nativity

Gianfrancesco Penni

Oil on panel, 76,4 cm. (Diam)

1513 - 1514

Cava dei Tirreni (Campania, Italia), Badia della Santissima Trinità, Museo

44

Study for the Holy Family

Gianfrancesco Penni, brush, wash and white body-colour over black chalk on paper, 19,7 x 24,9 cm

ca.1513 - 1518

Oxford, The Ashmolean Museum. Purchased, 1940

45

he Circumcision

Giulio Romano

Oil on panel, transferred to canvas, 115 x 122 cm

ca.1522

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des peintures. Collection de Louis XIV (acquis en 1684)

46

The Flagellation

Giulio Romano and assistant, oil on canvas, 164 x 145 cm

ca.1520 - 1521

Rome, Basilica di Santa Prassede. Ministero dell'Interno, Dipartimento per le Libertà e l'Immigrazione, Direzione Centrale per l'Amministrazione del Fondo Edifici di Culto

47

The Dëesis (Christ in Glory with Saints)

Giulio Romano, oil on panel. 122 x 98 cm

ca. 1519 - 1520

Parma, Galleria Nazionale

48

The Virgin and Child

Giulio Romano, oil on panel, 105 x 77 cm

ca. 1522

Florence, Galleria degli Uffizi

49

Cartoon for The Stoning of Saint Stephen

Giulio Romano

Charcoal and black chalk on paper, mounted on canvas, 411 x 285 cm

1520 - 1521

Vatican City, Musei Vaticani

50

Study for one of the figures [in The Stoning of Saint Stephen]

Giulio Romano

Black chalk on buff-washed paper, 38,9 x 12,4 cm

1520 - 1521

The Royal Collection. Lent by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

51

Cardinal Bernardo Dovizi da Bibbiena

Raphael (and workshop?)

Oil on canvas, 85 x 66,3 cm
ca.1516 - 1517
Florence, Galleria Palatina di Palazzo Pitti

52

Giuliano de Medici

Raphael and workshop

Oil on canvas (attached to a modern board), 83.2 x 66 cm

1515

Lent by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Jules Bache Collection, 1949

53

Doña Isabel de Requesens y Enríquez de Cardona-Anglesola

Giulio Romano (perhaps with an intervention by Raphael), oil on panel, transferred to canvas, 120 x 95 cm

1518

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des peintures. Collection de François Ier

54

Lorenzo de Medici, Duke of Urbino

Raphael

Oil on canvas, 97 x 79 cm

1518

Private collection

55

Baldassare Castiglione

Raphael

Oil on canvas, 82 x 67 cm

1519

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des peintures. Collection de Louis XIV

56

Self-Portrait with Giulio Romano, known as Self-Portrait with a Friend

Raphael

Oil on canvas, 99 x 83 cm

1519 - 1520

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des peintures. Entré dans la collection royale avant 1625

57

Bindo Altoviti

Raphael

Oil on panel, 59,7 x 43,8 cm

ca. 1516 - 1518

Washington, National Gallery of Art, Samuel H. Kress Collection 1943.4.33

58

Portrait of a Young Woman (Fiammetta Soderini?)

Giulio Romano, possibly reworked by Raphael

Oil on panel, 60 x 44 cm

ca.1518 - 1520

Strasbourg, Musée des Beaux-Arts

59

Portrait of a Boy

Giulio Romano

Oil on panel, 43,8 x 29 cm

1518 - 1519

Madrid, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza

60

Woman at a Mirror

Giulio Romano, oil on panel, transferred to canvas, 105 x 83,5 cm

1523 - 1524

Moscow, Museo Estatal de Bellas Artes Pushkin

62

Study for the composition

Copy after Gianfrancesco Penni after Raphael

Pen and wash over chalk, on beige prepared paper, heightened with white by Michel II Corneille, 41,3 x 27,4 cm

After 1516

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des Arts graphiques

63

Study for Christ, Moses, Elijah, three apostles and two other figures

Raphael

Red chalk over stylus, squared in red chalk, on paper, 24,6 x 35 cm

1518 - 1519 (?)

The Trustees of the Chatsworth Settlement

64

Study for Saint Matthew and another apostle

Raphael

Red chalk over stylus, on paper, 32,8 x 23,2 cm

ca.1518 - 1519 (?)

The Trustees of the Chatsworth Settlement

65

Auxiliary cartoon for the head of a young apostle

Raphael

Black chalk over spolveri on paper, 37,5 x 27,8 cm

1519 - 1520 (?)

The Trustees of the Chatsworth Settlement

66

Study for two apostles

Raphael

Red chalk over stylus, traces of black chalk on left-hand figure, on paper, perhaps counterproofed, 34,1 x 22,3 cm

1518 - 1519 (?)

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des Art graphiques

67

Study for the possessed son and his father

Giulio Romano

Red chalk over stylus (under the father), on paper, 28,6 x 19,2 cm

1518 - 1519 (?)

Milan, Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Pinacoteca

68

Nude study

Copy after Gianfrancesco Penni after Raphael

Red chalk over stylus on paper, 53,4 x 37,6 cm

ca.1550

Vienna, Albertina

69

Study for an apostle

Raphael.

Black chalk with white body-colour on paper, 26,4 x 19,8 cm

1518 - 1519 (?)

Paris, Musée du Louvre. Département des Art graphiques

70

Study for the head of a kneeling woman

Raphael

Black chalk with faint white chalk highlights overspolveri on paper, 33 x 24,2 cm

1518 - 1519 (?)

Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum

71

Auxiliary cartoon for the head of Saint Mathew

Raphael

Black chalk over spolvero on paper, 39,9 x 35 cm

1519 - 1520 (?)

London, British Museum

72

Auxiliary cartoon for the head of an apostle

Raphael

Black chalk over spolverion paper, 26,4 x 19,8 cm

ca.1519 - 1520 (?)

London, British Museum

73

Auxiliary cartoon for the heads and hands of two apostles

Raphael

Black chalk with faint white chalk highlights overspolveri on paper, 49,9 x 36,4 cm

ca.1519 - 1520 (?)

Oxford, The Ashmolean Museum. Presented by a Body of Subscribers, 1846

74

Modello for the first version of The Transfiguration

Copy after Gianfrancesco Penni (?), after Raphael

Brush and wash, with white heightening, on dark grey washed paper, 39,8 x 26,8 cm

1516

Vienna, Albertina

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