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Turner and the Masters

22.06.2010 - 19.09.2010

Organised by Tate Britain, in collaboration with the Réunion des Musées Nationaux, the Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais and the Museo Nacional del Prado.

On 22 June 2010 the Prado will inaugurate the major exhibition Turner and the Masters, from London (Tate Britain, 23 September 2009 to 31 January 2010), and Paris (Grand Palais, 22 February to 24 May). The exhibition looks at the way that Turner produced his work in full awareness of the art of the great Old Masters, whom he studied in depth, while simultaneously paying attention to the artistic activity of a number of his contemporaries.

For the first time, the exhibition establishes a dialogue between Turner’s most important paintings, works by masters of other periods and those contemporary with his own time. The version of the exhibition to be seen at the Museo del Prado, which will comprise 80 paintings loaned from European and American institutions and collections, will include various works not shown in London and Paris. These include Shade and Darkness. The Eve of the Flood,Light and ColourThe Morning after the Flood, and Peace. Burial at Sea, three masterpieces from the end of Turner’s career.

Turner and the Masters aims to offer a complete overview of the artist’s oeuvre in order to reveal his connections with other painters of the stature of Rembrandt, Rubens and Claude Lorraine, among others, as well as the profoundly original way in which he absorbed their influence from the outset of his career to his final compositions.

Curator:
Javier Barón Thaidigsmann

Access

Room A and B. Jerónimos Building

Opening time

Tuesdays to Sundays, from 9am to 8pm. Closed to the public every Monday.

Supported by:
Fundación Axa
Organized by:
Tate Britain
Réunion des Musées Nationaux et Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais
In collaboration with:
Comunidad de Madrid
Turismo Madrid

Videos

Exhibition

Introduction

Introduction
Aeneas and the Sibyl, Lake Avernus
Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 76.5 x 98.4 cm
1798. Londres, Tate

Having already been seen in London and Paris, Turner and the Masters will now be shown at the Museo del Prado in Madrid. Its aim is to reveal to visitors the extent of Turner’s links with other historically important artists and the profoundly original way in which he assimilated their influence. This comparison will assist in an understanding of how Turner’s approach to and assimilation of other artists was intended not just as an homage to them but also involved a subtle and highly original type of transformation of their teachings.

Among the differences between this version of the exhibition and those already seen are the presence of a number of paintings not shown in London or Paris, including Shipwreck of a Cargo Boat, Snowstorm: Hannibal and his Army crossing the Alps, Peace. Burial at Sea, Shade and Darkness: evening of the Deluge, and Light and Colour (Goethe’s Theory): the morning after the Deluge, all absolute masterpieces by Turner.

The works by other painters to be seen in the exhibition include some particularly outstanding masterpieces that have never previously been exhibited in Spain, such as Girl at the Window by Rembrandt, Les Plaisirs du Bal by Watteau, both loaned from Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, and the latter only shown at the Prado, as are the major canvases by Claude Lorraine and Rubens, Port Scene with the Embarkation of Saint Ursula (London, National Gallery), and Landscape with a Cart at Dusk (Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans van Beuningen). Also on display solely in the version of the exhibition at the Prado is An English Ship in a north-west Gale trying to beat windward (National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London) by the 17th-century, English-based Dutch painter Willem van de Velde the Younger.

Sections

Sections
Apullia in Search of Apullus, Learns form the Swain the Cause of his Metamorphosis
 Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas. 148.5 x 241 cm. 1814
London, Tate

During the 19th century Turner was one of the key figures within the modernisation of landscape painting due to the extremely innovative nature of his ideas. The foundations of his approach undoubtedly rest on the profound study of the work of the Old Masters that he undertook. From the outset of his career the artist was aware that to possess a truly broad formation required a knowledge both of the work of the great masters of the past and of the art of his own time.

Within the development of his own style, an extremely important role was played by 16th-century Venetian painting (Titian, Veronese) and, above all, French classical landscape painting (Claude, Poussin), whose models the artist closely followed. In addition to this dual tradition, which was highly appreciated in English academic art circles, he added the influence of northern painting, both the Dutch school (Rembrandt and Ruisdael, among others), and Flemish art (Rubens, Teniers), as well as Watteau and the work of other British painters closer to his own day, such as Gainsborough and Wilkie.

Turner’s interest in Old Master painting led him to pay explicit homage to some of the most important artists of the past, including Raphael, Ruisdael, Watteau and Canaletto, introducing their themes and motifs into his work or making them the actual subjects of his paintings. Throughout Turner’s career the issue of comparison and competition with the British artists of his time is an important one. Their works hung together at the Royal Academy exhibitions, and this confrontation was particularly significant with regard to another great British painter, John Constable.

Towards the end of his career Turner executed works that can be seen as re-thinkings and profound reconsiderations of his entire career, filtered through the dual influence of classical landscape (Claude) and Dutch naturalism (Ruisdael), and resulting in work of a remarkable intensity that led to an authentic transformation of the art of landscape.

Education and emulation

Education and emulation
The Wreck of a Transport Ship
Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 172.7 x 241.2 cm
c. 1805 - 1810. Lisbon, Fundaçao Calouste Gulbenkian

This opening section shows how Turner’s conventional training as an architectural draughtsman and at the Royal Academy’s drawing schools from 1789 laid the foundations of his enormous ambition. It was here that he learnt his craft, and the all-important lesson that artists were meant to aspire to greatness by copying, then trying to rival, those who had come before.

Turner’s growing ambitions are apparent in the pictures he created in the later 1790s and in the first decade of the nineteenth century. He wanted to emulate the elevated poetry of classical landscape painting and the powerful naturalism of the seventeenth-century Dutch masters. These pictures show, too, that he had absorbed the lessons of the most adventurous recent art.

The Academy and the Grand Style

The Academy and the Grand Style
The Decline of the Carthaginian Empire
Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 170.2 x 238.8 cm
1817. London, Tate

Perhaps in response to developments in contemporary French painting, from about 1820 Turner produced a number of pictures dealing with the theme of artistic biography. Around the same time he started to term himself a "Historical Landscape" painter, suggesting the widening range of reference and ambition that he brought to his work.

Turner’s first completed painting in this genre was the impressively large Rome, from the Vatican, showing the Renaissance artist Raphael displaying his masterpieces. Turner went on to create pictures that represented the Venetian artist Canaletto at work and the Flemish-born artist Watteau in his studio. His Port Ruysdael brought that master of Dutch painting to mind by the invention of a place named after him, as well as through an evocative pictorial style. Underlying these pictures is Turner’s growing sense of his own mortality, a questioning of whether he had achieved enough to merit a place alongside the predecessors he most admired. By focusing on celebrated and successful artists from the past, such pictures also implied criticism of the relatively neglected state of the arts in modern Britain.

Turner and the North

Turner and the North
The Forest of Bere.
Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 89 x 119.5 cm
1808. London, Tate.

Turner’s engagement with the Northern European art tradition was central to the formation of his artistic identity. During the nineteenth century, British artists increasingly looked to the technical dexterity and naturalism of Dutch and Flemish painting as a model for their own attempts to depict their native scenery. This was partly a response to the demands of the market, as skilfully rendered, illusionistic Northern canvases were highly prized by collectors and connoisseurs. Although Grand Style Italian works held a higher status within the academic hierarchy, smaller Netherlandish images, and their undemanding subject matter, were better suited for private collections.

Turner engaged with a broad range of Northern traditions. The early years of the nineteenth century witnessed a vogue for paintings of everyday life, by artists such as Rembrandt and David Teniers, whose example was emulated by Turner’s contemporary David Wilkie with great critical (and financial) success. Determined not to miss an opportunity, Turner staged a number of forays into genre painting. He further expanded his repertoire with Rembrandtesque subjects and images evoking Watteau’s decorative park scenes.

Painters painted: the cult of the artist

Painters painted: the cult of the artist
Bridge of Sighs, Ducal Palace and Custom House, Venice: Canaletti Painting.
Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on mahogany, 51.1 x 81.6 cm
1833. London, Tate. Presented by Robert Vernon 1847

Perhaps in response to developments in contemporary French painting, from about 1820 Turner produced a number of pictures dealing with the theme of artistic biography. Around the same time he started to term himself a "Historical Landscape" painter, suggesting the widening range of reference and ambition that he brought to his work.

Turner’s first completed painting in this genre was the impressively large Rome, from the Vatican, showing the Renaissance artist Raphael displaying his masterpieces. Turner went on to create pictures that represented the Venetian artist Canaletto at work and the Flemish-born artist Watteau in his studio. His Port Ruysdael brought that master of Dutch painting to mind by the invention of a place named after him, as well as through an evocative pictorial style. Underlying these pictures is Turner’s growing sense of his own mortality, a questioning of whether he had achieved enough to merit a place alongside the predecessors he most admired. By focusing on celebrated and successful artists from the past, such pictures also implied criticism of the relatively neglected state of the arts in modern Britain.

Competing with contemporaries

Competing with contemporaries
Helvoetsluys.
Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 91.4 x 122 cm
1832, Tokyo, Fuji Art Museum

The late Georgian art world was a fiercely competitive arena, with the heat of battle at its most intense in the summer exhibitions at the Royal Academy. It was here that Turner staged his most audacious attempts to outshine his contemporaries. In a space crowded with a noisy multitude, with hundreds of pictures vying for attention on the walls, painters had to exploit their talent and materials to the limit, if they were to succeed in catching the spectator’s eye.

Key to commanding attention were high colouring and dynamic compositions, both of which Turner exploited to great success. He was also an adept showman, and would take full advantage of the Academy’s ‘varnishing days’ —a short period before the exhibition was publicly open, when artists were allowed to make last-minute adjustments to their pictures— to perform acts of outright confrontation. In so doing, Turner was not only drawing attention to his work, but asking that it be seen as a response and challenge to those around it. If Turner’s engagement with the Old Masters demonstrates the height of his ambition, his rivalry with the moderns proves his determination to dominate his own era.

Turner paints himself into history

Turner paints himself into history
Fishing Boats Bringing a Disabled Ship into Port Ruysdael.
Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 91.4 x 123.2 cm
1844 .London, Tate

Even in his most innovative works, painted in his maturity as an artist, Turner reasserted his faith in the great tradition of European art. The main starting points in his career had been Claude’s classical landscapes and the more empirical approach to nature typical of Dutch masters like Ruisdael. Both influences were still bearing fruit in the late years in works whose execution reveals development towards a radically modern conception. At the same time and as a means to consolidating his place in the history of art, Turner planned the bequest to the National Gallery of two works representative of his way of interpreting that double tradition. Finally, in tackling themes in his mature years from religious history, particularly Genesis and the Apocalypse, he displayed the most universal facet of his art, significantly linked to modern conceptions on colour.

Turner. Chronology

1775 Turner was born in London on 23 April, son of William, a barber and wig salesman, and Mary Marshall, a housewife who died in a mental asylum when Turner was 29.

1786 Turner signed his first known drawings.

1789 He entered the Royal Academy as a student. Its director, Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792) encouraged his students to "study the masterpieces of your predecessors."

1790 Exhibited his first watercolour at the Royal Academy.

1792 Travelled to Wales.

1794 Started to work with Thomas Girtin (1775-1802) at Dr Thomas Monro’s house.

1796 Exhibited his first oil painting, Fishermen at Sea, at the Royal Academy.

1798 During a trip to Wales, Turner visited the birthplace of Richard Wilson (1713-1782), the English landscape artist who most influenced him at this period.

1799 In William Beckford’s collection Turner saw paintings by Claude brought back from Italy.

1800 The Duke of Bridgewater commissioned him to paint a marine view as a pair to a work by Van de Velde.

1801 First trip to Scotland.

1802 Turner was made a member of the Royal Academy. He made his first trip to Europe, visiting Switzerland via France. In Paris he visited the Louvre, where he studied Titian and Poussin.

1804 Turner’s mother died in a mental asylum. The artist opened his own private gallery.

1807 Turner was appointed Professor of Perspective at the Royal Academy. He published the first part of his Liber Studiorum, which he continued until 1819.

1809 He spent the summer at Petworth House (Sussex), residence of the Earl of Egremont.

1811 Turner gave a series of lectures on perspective.

1815 At the Royal Academy he exhibited Crossing the Brook and Dido building Carthage. The Rise of the Carthaginian Empire.

1817 Turner travelled to Belgium, Holland and Germany.

1819 He made his first trip to Italy where he visited Venice, Rome, Naples and Florence. Seconded by the sculptor Canova, Turner was made an honorary member of the Accademia di San Luca in Rome.

1821 The artist travelled to France where he visited Paris, Rouen and Dieppe in order to illustrate The Rivers of France.

1824 He travelled along the Meuse and the Moselle in Luxembourg and northern France.

1825 Turner visited Holland.

1826 He travelled in Normandy, Brittany and along the Loire.

1828 Turner made his second visit to Rome where he exhibited his work. En route, he passed through Paris, Lyons, Avignon and Florence.

1829 He returned from Italy via Turin. Turner visited the Channel Islands, Normandy and Paris. Death of his father. He probably began his trips to Margate that year, staying at the house of Sophia Caroline Booth, with its views of the port.

1832 Travelled to France.

1833 Travelled to Germany, Austria and Venice.

1835 Travelled to Demark and Germany, where he visited the museums in Dresden and Berlin. Visits Bohemia.

1837 Turner’s period as Professor of Perspective at the Royal Academy came to an end. He painted Interior at Petworth, possibly in relation to the recent death of Lord Egremont.

1839 Second trip along the Meuse and the Moselle and around Luxembourg.

1840 Turner met John Ruskin. He read Eastlake’s translation of Goethe’s Theory of Colours.

1843 Turner exhibited Shade and Darkness: evening of the Deluge, and Light and Colour (Goethe’s Theory): morning after the Deluge.

1851 Turner died in his house at Chelsea aged 76. He was buried in Saint Paul’s Cathedral.

Artworks

1

An English Ship in a Gale Trying to Claw off a Lee Shore

Willem Van de Velde The Young
Oil on canvas, 160,2 x 132,8 cm
1672
Greenwich, National Maritime Museum

2

The Wreck of a Transport Ship

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 172.7 x 241.2 cm
c. 1805 - 1810
Lisbon, Fundaçao Calouste Gulbenkian

3

Other Invernal View of the Villa of Maecenas in Tivoli

Giovanni Battista Piranesi
Engraving, 42 x 60 cm
1760 - 1778
Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional

4

The Interior of Durham Cathedral, Looking East along the South Aisle

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Pencil and watercolour on paper, 75.8 x 58 cm
h. 1798
London, Tate

5

Moonlight Landscape with a Road beside a Canal

Aert Van der Neer
Oil on panel, 35.6 x 65.5 cm
c. 1647 - 1650
Madrid, Museo Thyssen Bornemisza

6

Landscape with the Rest on the Flight into Egypt

John Wood after Rembrandt
Line engraving, 44.5 x 57.2 cm
Dublin, National Gallery of Ireland

7

Limekiln at Coalbrookdale

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on panel, 29 x 40.3 cm
c. 1797
New Haven, Yale Center for British Art. Paul Mellon Collection

8

Moonlight, a Study at Millbank

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on panel, 31.5 x 40.3 cm
1797
London, Tate

9

Lake Nemi, or ‘Speculum Dianae’

Richard Wilson
Oil on canvas, 75.6 x 97.2 cm
1758
Trustees of the Hoare Family. On loan to The National Trust, Stourhead

10

Ideal Landscape

Gaspard Dughet
Oil on canvas, 93.6 x 133 cm
c. 1658 - 1660
Glasgow City Council. Culture and Sport Glasgow

11

Aeneas and the Sibyl, Lake Avernus

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 76.5 x 98.4 cm
c. 1798
London, Tate

12

Apullia in Search of Apullus, Learns from the Swain the Cause of his Metamorphosis

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 148.5 x 241 cm
1814
London, Tate

13

Landscape with Jacob, Laban and his daughters

Claude Gelée (Claude Lorrain, Claudio de Lorena)
Oil on canvas, 143.5 x 251.5 cm
1654
Petworth House, The Egremont Collection (The National Trust)

14

Palestrina - Composition

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas 140.3 x 248.9 cm
1828 - 1830
London, Tate. Bequeathed by C.W. Dyson Perrins 1958

15

Landscape with Hermit

Salvatore Rosa
Oil on canvas, 75.8 x 75.5 cm
c. 1662
National Museums Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery

16

Dolbadern Castle, North Wales

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 119.4 x 90.2 cm
1800
London, Royal Academy of Arts

18

The Death of St. Peter Martyr

William Hilton
Oil on canvas, 109.5 x 76 cm
c. 1826, after original of 1530
Lincoln County Council. The Collection: Art and Archaeology in Lincolnshire
(Usher Art Gallery)

19

Venus and Adonis

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 149.9 x 119.4 cm
1803 - 1804
New York, Riverdale. Stanley Moss

20

Landscape with a Roman Road

After Nicholas Poussin
Oil on canvas, 793 x 100 cm
Late seventeenth century (?) after original c. 1648
London, By Permission of the Trustees of Dulwich Picture Gallery

21

Châteaux de St Michael, Bonneville, Savoy

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 91.4 x 121.9 cm
1803
New Haven, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

22

Tenth plague of Egypt

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 143.5 x 236.2 cm
1813
London, Tate

24

Crossing the Brook

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 193 x 165.1 cm
1815
London, Tate

25

Seaport with the Embarkation of Saint Ursula

Claude Gellée (Claude Lorraine, Claudio de Lorena)
Oil on canvas, 112.9 x 149 cm
1641
London, National Gallery, London

26

The Decline of the Carthaginian Empire

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 170.2 x 238.8 cm
1817
London, Tate

27

Jessica

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 122 x 91.5 cm
1830
London, Tate

28

Dutch Girl (`The Window’)

Gilbert Stuart Newton
Oil on panel, 37.1 x 27 cm
1829
London, Tate. Presented by Robert Vernon 1847

29

Girl at a window

Rembrandt
Oil on canvas, 81.6 x 66 cm
1645
London, Dulwich Picture Gallery

30

The Mill

Rembrandt
Oil on canvas, 87.6 x 105.6 cm
1645 - 1648
Washington, D.C. National Gallery of Art. Widener Collection

31

Windmill on Hill: Valley and Winding River in Middle Distance; Sunset Effect

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Pencil and watercolour on paper, 19 x 27.7 cm
c. 1795
London, Tate

32

Windmill and Lock

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Etching and watercolour on paper, 17.8 x 25.9 cm
1811
London, Tate

33

A Herdsman with Five Cows by a River

Aelbert Cuyp
Oil on panel, 45.4 x 74 cm
c. 1650 - 1655
London, The National Gallery

34

Abingdon

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 101.6 x 130.2 cm
1806 (?)
London, Tate

35

A Country Blacksmith Disputing upon the Price of Iron, and the Price Charged to the Butcher for Shoeing his Poney

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on panel, 54.9 x 77.8 cm
1807
London, Tate

36

Two Men Playing Cards in the Kitchen of an Inn

David Teniers the Young
Oil on panel, 55.5 x 76.5 cm
1635 - 1640
London, The National Gallery, London. Salting Bequest 1910

37

The Blind Fiddler

David Wilkie
Oil on panel, 57.8 x 79.4 cm
1807
London, Tate. Presented by Sir George Beaumont Bt 1826

38

The Holy Family at Night (The Cradle)

Circle of Rembrandt
Oil on panel, 66.5 x 78 cm
c. 1642 - 1648
Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum

39

The Unpaid Bill, or the Dentist Reproving his Son's Prodigality

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on panel, 59.4 x 80 cm
1808
The Schindler Family

40

The Forest of Bere

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 89 x 119.5 cm
1808
London, Tate

41

Landscape with a Wagon at Sunset

Peter Paul Rubens
Oil on panel, 49.5 x 54.7 cm
c. 1635
Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans van Beuningen

42

Boy Driving Cows near a Pool

Thomas Gainsborough
Oil on canvas, 58.4 x 76.2 cm
1786
London, Tate. Presented by Robert Vernon 1847

43

What you will!

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 48.2 x 52 cm
1822
Williamstown, Massachusetts, USA. Sterling and Francis Clark Institute. Gift of the Manton Art Foundation in memory of Sir Edwin and Lady Manton

45

A Calm

an van de Cappelle
Oil on canvas, 110 x 148.2 cm
1654
Cardiff, The National Museums & Galleries of Wales

46

Sun Rising through Vapour: Fishermen Cleaning and Selling Fish

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 134 x 179.5 cm
1807
London, The National Gallery. Turner Bequest, 1856

47

François 1er, Charles Quint and the Duchesse d’Etampes

Richard Parkes Bonington
Oil on canvas, 35 x 27 cm
1827
Paris, Musée du Louvre

48

Les Plaisirs du Bal (« Le Bal Châmpetre »)

Jean-Antoine Watteau
Oil on canvas, 52.6 x 85.4 cm
1717
London, Dulwich Picture Gallery

49

Watteau Study by Fresnoy's Rules

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on panel, 30 x 69.2 cm
1831
London, Tate

50

The Molo from the Canal di S Marco

Giovanni Antonio Canaletto
Oil on canvas, 48.5 x 80.5 cm
1733 - 1734
Madrid, Private collection

51

Bridge of Sighs, Ducal Palace and Custom-House, Venice: Canaletti Painting

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on panel, 51.1 x 81.6 cm
1833
London, Tate. Presented by Robert Vernon 1847

52

Rome, from the Vatican. Raffaelle, Accompanied by La Fornarina, Preparing his Pictures for the Decoration of the Loggia

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 177.2 x 335.3 cm
1820
London, Tate

53

Port Ruysdael

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 92.1 x 122.6 cm
1827
New Haven, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

54

Rough Sea at a Jetty

Jacob van Ruisdael
Oil on canvas, 98.5 x 131.4 cm
c. 1652 - 1655
Fort Worth, Texas. Kimbell Art Museum

55

The Canal of the Giudecca, and the Church of the Gesuati, Venice

Clarkson Stanfield
Oil on canvas, 61 x 90.2 cm
1837
London, Tate. Presented by Robert Vernon 1847

56

Venice from the Porch of the Madonna della Salute

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 91.4 x 122.2 cm
1835
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Bequest of Cornelius Vanderbilt, 1899

57

Calais Sands, Low Water, Poissards Collecting Bait

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 73 x 107 cm
1830
Bury Art Gallery and Museum

58

French Coast with Fishermen

Richard Parkes Bonington
Oil on canvas, 64.3 x 96.7 cm
1826
London, Tate

59

Snowstorm: Hannibal and his Army Crossing the Alps

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 146 x 237.5 cm
1812
London, Tate

60

The Fall of an Avalanche in the Grisons

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 90.2 x 120 cm
London, Tate

61

A Waterspout in the Mountains of Switzerland

Philip James de Loutherbourg
Oil on canvas, 106.7 x 157.8 cm
1809
Petworth House, The Egremont Collection (The National Trust)

62

The White House at Chelsea

Thomas Girtin
Watercolour on paper, 29.8 x 51.4 cm
1800
London, Tate. Bequeathed by Mrs Ada Montefiore, 1933

63

Hulks on the Tamar : Twilight

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Gouache and watercolour on paper, 26.2 x 33 cm
c. 1811 - 1813
London, Tate

64

A Ship Aground

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 69.8 x 135.9 cm
c. 1828
London, Tate

65

Yarmouth Jetty

John Constable
Oil on canvas, 32.4 x 50.5 cm
after 1823
London, Tate. Bequeathed by George Salting 1910

66

The Opening of Waterloo Bridge ('Whitehall Stairs, June 18th, 1817')

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 130.8 x 218 cm
1832
London, Tate

67

Helvoetsluys; the City of Utrecht, 64, going to Sea

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 91.4 x 122 cm
1832
Tokyo, Fuji Art Museum

68

The Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 2615 x 3685 mm
1822 - 1824
London, Greenwich, National Maritime Museum

69

The Glorious First of June, 1794

Philip-Jacques de Loutherbourg
Oil on canvas, 266.5 x 373.5 cm
1795
London, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich Hospital Collection

70

Mercury Sent to Admonish Aeneas

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 90.2 x 120.6 cm
1850
London, Tate

71

Seaport at Sunset

Claude Gellée (Claude Lorraine, Claudio de Lorena)
Oil on canvas, 103 x 135 cm
1639
Paris, Musée du Louvre

72

Regulus

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 89.5 x 123.8 mm
1837
London, Tate

73

Fishing Boats Bringing a Disabled Ship into Port Ruysdael

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 91.4 x 123.2 cm
1844
London, Tate

74

Rough Sea

Jacob van Ruisdael
Oil on canvas, 107 x 125.8 cm
1670
Boston Museum of Fine Arts. William Francis Warden Fund

75

Snow Storm – Steam-Boat off a Harbour’s Mouth making Signals in Shallow Water, and going by the Lead. The Author was in this Storm on the Night the Ariel left Harwich

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 91.4 x 121.9 cm
1842
London, Tate

76

Subject from 'Revelations'

Francis Danby
Oil on canvas, 61.5 x 76.8 cm
1829
Rosenblum Family

77

The Angel Standing in the Sun

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 78.7 x 78.7 cm
1846
London, Tate

78

Peace – Burial at Sea

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 87 x 86.7 cm
London, Tate

79

Shade and Darkness - the Evening of the Deluge

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 78.7 x 78.7 cm
1843
London, Tate

80

Light and Colour (Goethe's Theory) - the Morning after the Deluge - Moses Writing the Book of Genesis

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Oil on canvas, 78.7 x 78.7 cm
1843
London, Tate

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