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Exhibition Museo del Prado - Fundación AXA

Paret

Museo Nacional del Prado. Madrid 5/24/2022 - 8/21/2022

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In the words of Javier Solana, President of the Royal Board of Trustees of the Museo Nacional del Prado: “Luis Paret is possibly the 18th-century Spanish artist who most deserved a major exhibition of the type now opening at the Museo del Prado.” With the invaluable collaboration of private and public lenders and the support of Fundación AXA, the Prado has thus reunited most of the artist’s known paintings. They include Masquerade, The Puerta del Sol, Paret’s Daughters, View of Bermeo and The Annunciation to Zacharias, in addition to a remarkable group of drawings such as Hannibal at the Temple of Hercules in Cadiz and The Oath of Allegiance to don Fernando as Prince of Asturias, which together allow for an appreciation of the richness and variety of a painter alert to the changes of his day and one characterised by a remarkable originality and versatility.

In this first monographic exhibition on Paret organised by the Prado, Gudrun Maurer, the museum’s Curator of 18th-century Painting and Goya and the curator of the exhibition, has surveyed Paret’s professional career with the aim of singling out the excellent technical level and striking originality with which the artist depicted his chosen subjects while also presenting the new information on Paret’s working method obtained from the scientific analysis of his paintings undertaken by the Museum’s technical department.

The exhibition offers a complete survey of Paret’s career and is divided into nine sections. The first provides a unique opportunity to compare a key drawing from his early period with the first documented painting by his celebrated fellow-Spaniard Francisco de Goya, who was born the same year as Paret. The two artists started their careers (Paret in fact five years before Goya) after being singled out in competitions organised by different Fine Arts Academies: Paret by the Academia de San Francisco in Madrid and Goya by the one in Parma, Italy. Those two works which brought the artists recognition - both, in fact on the subject of Hannibal - are now on display in the exhibition, one loaned from the Academia de San Fernando and the other in the Prado’s collection. In general, the two paintings reveal the importance of both academic competitions and the period of training in Italy for artists’ careers. The comparison with Goya also emphasises Paret’s notable technical and compositional skills at this early date while the marked artistic personalities of the two artists are evident in the different styles of their works.

The next section starts with a small group of early drawings by Paret from the collection of the Prado and the Biblioteca Nacional de España. They reveal the artist’s originality in his inventive and versatile approach to the subjects and the modernity of his choices. Subjects include The Necromancer, The Glory of Anacreon and Roman Military Trophy. The principal work in this room is one of Paret’s earliest known paintings, Masquerade of 1767 from the Prado’s collection. It once again reveals Paret’s modernity in the context of his time, as an artist who from the outset was able to respond to the new demand for images of society in the public and private space and which reflected the varied fashions and customs of the different social classes. Displayed here are other small-format cabinet paintings on innovative subjects in the context of Spanish art of this period, such as Scene of a Boudoir (previously Play Rehearsal) from the Prado; The Letter from the Musée Goya in Castres; Geniani’s Shop from the Museo Lázaro Galdiano; and The Puerta del Sol from the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de Cuba. In addition, paintings on rarely depicted episodes from life at the Spanish court, such as The Royal Couples and Charles III dining before the Court (both in the Prado), offer a panoramic view of different facets of contemporary society and also demonstrate the success Paret enjoyed between 1766 and 1775, the year he was exiled.

The third section presents one of the artist’s exquisite coloured drawings of birds alongside Zebra from the Prado’s collection and a private collection respectively, works executed by Paret for the Natural History Cabinet of the Infante don Luis, Charles III’s brother, who appointed Paret his painter in 1774. They reveal the artist’s ability to combine an almost scientific depiction of his subjects with landscape settings of great subtlety and refined beauty.

The fourth section focuses on Paret’s few known portraits, which are notable for their exquisite technique and personal, intimate nature. They also mark the transition between the artist’s Madrid phase and his years in Bilbao. The four known Self-portraits of around 1770-75 to 1780 reflect the painter’s powerful, self-confident personality but also his different states of mind. This is evident during his exile in Puerto Rico when he portrayed himself not just as a jíbaro or local peasant in 1776 but also in the melancholy Self-portrait in the Studio of 1777 which Paret sent to a trusted individual in Madrid, as the inscription detected by the recent X-radiograph reveals. Shown alongside these works are other portraits such as those of the artist’s wife and their daughters, compositions enhanced by complex floral ornamentation; a portrait of a typical Enlightenment gentleman (on loan from the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando); and that of Antonio Sancha from the Biblioteca Nacional de España. Finally, there are compositions on the theme of motherhood, such as the small painting of The Virgin and Child from the Abelló Collection, The Orange Seller from Patrimonio Nacional and the two floral bouquets from the Prado. Flowers were an enormously important motif in Paret’s work and one that reveals the virtuosity characteristic of all the paintings in this section.

The fifth section opens with a painting of The Circumspection of Diogenes which Paret sent from Bilbao in 1780 to the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando and which led to his nomination as an Academician of Merit. His subsequent enhanced reputation is evident in the large-format religious compositions that he executed in Bilbao, such as The Invention of the True Cross painted for the Gortázar family and their family chapel (private collection) and The Martyrdom of Saint Lucy for the parish church of Santa María in Larrabezúa (now in the Museo Diocesano de Arte Sacro in Bilbao). These exceptionally exquisite paintings of great technical and compositional delicacy demonstrate Paret’s importance in the context of 18th-century Spanish art. Their presence in the exhibition makes it possible to appreciate his mastery in devising subjects that were unusual in the context of the day and his ability to create scenes of a monumental nature with extremely dynamic figures. Furthermore, they reveal the artist’s extensive knowledge of classical sculpture and the work of the Old Masters such as Rubens, as well as his exceptional manner of combining grandiose, classical beauty with lighter Rococo resources such as a markedly pastel palette. The juxtaposition of these works with small-format paintings and drawings on religious subjects - including The Apparition of Saint Michael to Charles VIII of France and Saint Francis of Paula (private collection), a unique subject in Spanish art - and with a number of his designs for religious monuments in Bilbao further reveals Paret’s multifaceted nature in this pictorial genre.

The next section is devoted to paintings and drawings on bucolic subjects and classical, erotic ones produced for private clients. These reveal Paret’s enormously original powers of invention, including The Triumph of Love over War from the Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao and the drawings of The Eclogue from the Prado, which are shown together with paintings on similar subjects from real life, albeit with a certain critical element, such as Gallant Scene of High Society and Gallant Scene of Low Life (private collection), Saying the Rosary from Patrimonio Nacional and the drawing of The Procuress and the Lovers from the Prado. The small painting of Young Woman asleep in a Hammock from the Prado establishes a connection between the two worlds through references to classical sculpture and modern society, the latter including the exoticism of the Caribbean.

The seventh section features eight of the nine currently known views of the Basque Country painted by Paret, executed for the Prince of Asturias, for private clients and as commissions for Charles III. These are now divided between museums in Spain, France and the UK. The group constitutes a striking survey of landscape and also of the variety of society of the day, its different working and leisure activities and the region’s ports and coastline. These notably complex paintings in both technical and compositional terms are among Paret’s most important creations from his time in Bilbao. Also on display are the two fine drawings of ports in the Basque country, loaned from private collections, which reveal the artist’s masterly ability in the use of different media, such as black chalk, pen and brush, which he employed to capture the characteristics of these landscapes and the brilliant effects of light observed in nature.

The eighth section focuses on two oils on canvas executed by the artist for the chapel of San Juan del Ramo in the church of Santa María de la Asunción in Viana: The Annunciation to Zacharias and The Visitation of the Virgin to Saint Elizabeth. In these striking paintings, which are among the last produced by Paret during his Bilbao period, the remarkable quality and technical and compositional complexity achieved by the artist reaches its peak. Furthermore, they reveal the original way in which he made use of models to add liveliness and expressivity to his figures and scenes, as well as the excellent technique that he employed to describe all the details in his works with enormous naturalness and variety. Also evident is the way in which Paret applied a modern, art historian’s eye to make use of the Baroque and Neo-classical styles in order to emphasise the era of the scenes depicted. Finally, this section includes a group of excellent preparatory drawings for one of these paintings (private collection) and for the mural decoration of this chapel (Museo del Prado).

Following his return to Madrid in 1789, in 1792 Paret was appointed Vice-secretary of the Academia de San Fernando and Secretary to its Architectural Committee, receiving few commissions for paintings but producing numerous drawings of beautiful scenes and figures for book illustrations and other projects. The paintings from the end of the artist’s career are displayed in this ninth section of the exhibition. They include three allegories of one of the provinces of Spain, works of enormous classical beauty which are the only ones now known from a series of ten paintings executed in 1789 for the headquarters of the Five Major Guilds in Madrid (private collection and Museo del Prado). The one in the Prado was only rediscovered five years ago and was acquired for the Museum. Finally, visitors will be able to appreciate an example of Paret’s creative process through the painting of The Oath of Allegiance to don Fernando as Prince of Asturias, its remarkable preparatory drawing in the Louvre, two preliminary drawings of details for that work (Biblioteca Nacional) and an infrared reflectograph which reveals an excellent underdrawing. Other equally important examples are shown in a video.

The exhibition closes with an unfinished painting of The Botanical Garden from the Paseo del Prado. It depicts the entrance to the garden, located close to the Museo del Prado.

This extremely comprehensive survey of Paret’s career furthers an analysis of his approach and techniques while promoting his recognition as the most important Spanish artist of the 18th century alongside Goya.

The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue by the curator  Gudrun Maruer with texts written by her, by other specialists and by the technical staff of the Museo del Prado and the Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao.

Curator:
Gudrun Maurer, Curator of 18th-century Spanish Painting and Goya at the Museo Nacional del Prado

Access

Room A and B. Jerónimos Building

Sponsored by:
Fundación AXA

Exhibition

The exhibition

The exhibition
The Shop of Geniani
Luis Paret
Oil on panel, 49,2 x 57,3 cm
1772
Madrid, Museo Lázaro Galdiano

Luis Paret (1746-1799) shared his year of birth with Francisco de Goya, whose outstanding career and subsequent influence ultimately overshadowed his role in 18th-century Spanish art. Another reason for this was his unusual life story, marked by long years of banishment in Puerto Rico and Bilbao owing to his ties with his principal patron, the Infante Don Luis, who was condemned by his brother, Charles III, to live remote from the court.

Nevertheless, Paret concluded his solid artistic and humanist training some years earlier than Goya, and he also caused surprise before him with his lively scenes on novel and contemporary themes. In them, he subtly reflected the life of a society that was slowly advancing towards modernity. These were paintings that called for an attentive gaze, inviting reflection at the same time as they delighted viewers.

However, Paret was also a bold creator of religious and allegorical paintings, a delicate portraitist and a sensitive landscape painter, as shown by his splendid views of the Bay of Biscay, in which he depicted nature in an almost scientific manner. To his complex and original compositions and his personal and eclectic style, he added a limpid and iridescent treatment of colour and, in his drawings, a masterly use of pencil, pen and wash.

This exhibition, the first the Museo del Prado has dedicated to Paret, brings together most of his paintings and a select group of his drawings. Laid out both chronologically and thematically, it will allow visitors to discover an artist of singular genius and personality and to enjoy an oeuvre full of diversity and beauty.

The formation of an artistic personality: the subject of Hannibal in Paret and in Goya

The formation of an artistic personality: the subject of Hannibal in Paret and in Goya
The Victorious Hannibal seeing Italy from the Alps for the first Time
Francisco de Goya (1746-1828)
1771
Oil on canvas
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

Luis Paret was born in the same year as Francisco de Goya, and both submitted entries for the painting competitions at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando in the year 1766. While Goya opted for the most difficult category, the first-class competition, and received no votes from the panel, Paret competed in the second-class category and was unanimously awarded the top prize. One of the subjects he had to present was Hannibal at the Temple of Hercules in Cadiz. A very similar subject, Hannibal the Conqueror, viewing Italy from the Alps, was required of participants in the competition held by the Academy of Parma in 1771, which Goya entered during his stay in Italy. Although Goya once more failed to win, he received a special commendation. Here, that thematic coincidence allows us to compare the artistic personalities of two painters, already very strong in this initial phase of their careers.

Paret, painter of novel social and courtly subjects

Paret, painter of novel social and courtly subjects
Masquerade
1767
Oil on panel
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

After receiving a prize from the Academy of San Fernando in 1766, Paret began a promising career at court in Madrid which culminated in 1774, when he was appointed as painter to the Infante Don Luis. A year later, he was banished to Puerto Rico.

The works of this period show how surprisingly modern he was. The painter adapted easily to new artistic trends, successfully tackling novel subjects and designing complex and singular compositions with unfailing technical mastery.

Some of the drawings on display attest to his assimilation of the new Neoclassical style that developed in Rome during the 1760s. Also shown are small paintings in which he reflected the most varied facets of the society of his time, including life at court, which also provides the subject for a larger painting destined for the royal family. With many small figures, these works require close observation and an ability to appreciate the richness of the settings and characters shown, which moreover reveal his skill as a portraitist and landscape painter.

Paret and the Natural History Cabinet of the Infante Don Luis

Paret and the Natural History Cabinet of the Infante Don Luis
Cebra
1774
Lápiz negro, pincel aguada y aguada de pigmentos opacos
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

Paret’s association with the Infante Don Luis de Borbón (1727-1785), the brother of King Charles III, was brief but personally and professionally intense. The artist received a pension from the Infante to train in Italy from 1763 to 1766, and worked for him after his return on various commissions for paintings and drawings, until the artist’s supposed involvement in his patron’s amorous dalliances resulted in his banishment to Puerto Rico in 1775.

Don Luis formed an excellent cabinet of natural history that contained specimens of birds, insects, quadrupeds, minerals and vegetables. Initially installed at the Royal Palace in Madrid, it was later moved to the Infante’s residence in Boadilla del Monte, where there were also live animals.

In 1774, Don Luis engaged Paret to make drawings of the important collection of stuffed birds, which were kept in glass cases and bell jars. The resulting album showed a desire not only to preserve and document the collection but also to create a precious object with drawings that would be valued in their own right.

The intimate Paret: portraits and small-format compositions

The intimate Paret: portraits and small-format compositions
Self-portrait Attired in Blue
Luis Paret
c. 1780
Oil on paper affixed to canvas
Colección Abelló

Paret’s work as a portraitist is scarce, and consists above all of small-format compositions, including both paintings and drawings. However, his great skill at the genre is observable from early on in works like The Royal Couples and Charles III dining before the Court, where the faces of several of the figures portrayed are superbly rendered despite their diminutive size.

Among his most intimate creations are his four self-portraits, painted in Madrid before his banishment, during his exile and after his return to Spain. Reflecting the artist’s passage through different states of mind, they form an unusual set for the time. Alongside them are the delightful and innovative portraits of his wife and daughters, together with those of prominent figures at court.

The virtuosity of all these works is also to be appreciated in his two paintings of flowers, an outstanding element of Paret’s oeuvre as a whole, while his originality finds expression in subjects centred on motherhood, like his Virgin and Child or his imagen of a slave girl in Puerto Rico, shown here in a version made in semi-precious stones by the Laboratory of Pietre Dure of El Buen Retiro.

Paret, member of the Academy. Religious works

Paret, member of the Academy. Religious works
The Circumspection of Diogenes
Luis Paret
1780
Oil on panel
Madrid, Museo de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando

In April 1780, a year and a half after returning from Puerto Rico and settling in Bilbao, Paret was admitted as a member of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando after sending in his picture of The Circumspection of Diogenes. Goya was similarly honoured the same day, in his case thanks to his Christ Crucified (Madrid, Prado).

The title of Academician brought Paret a number of public and private commissions, including several of a religious nature (among them altar designs, ephemeral monuments, etc.). These played an important role in his career.

Thanks to his originality and sensitivity, the painter managed to adapt to the expectations of his clients and develop a new eclectic style, a masterly and harmonious combination of the potent resources of the Baroque with the Neoclassical language demanded by the Academy, though without relinquishing the Rococo elements of his personal style such as the use of pastel tones or adornments like rocailles.

The subject of Love and gallantry: the beautiful and the deceitful

The subject of Love and gallantry: the beautiful and the deceitful
Saying the Rosary
Luis Paret
Oil on copper, 56,5 x 39 cm
c. 1780-84
Colecciones Reales, Patrimonio Nacional, Palacio Real, Madrid

Paret’s ability to conceive original images is especially evident in his works centred on love, whether in its idealised or its everyday form, though the borders between the two are often imprecise.

During this phase in Bilbao (end of 1778 to 1789), paintings and drawings on mythological and bucolic subjects with literary origins alternate with those centred on the deceitful gallantry of real life, with maids or procuresses as accomplices. These pictures reflect the role and destiny of women at that time, and express a more direct social critique than those created during the 1770s.

By contrast with the genre scenes painted by Paret in Madrid, these works are characterised by having fewer but more individualised figures with greater psychological depth. In this respect, the artist moves beyond the sentimentality of contemporary artists like Jean-Baptiste Greuze or Jean-Baptiste Le Prince, frequently cited as referents for his work, and comes closer to the concentrated compositions of Pietro Longhi.

Paret the landscapist: the views of the ports of the Basque Country

Paret the landscapist: the views of the ports of the Basque Country
View of Bermeo
Luis Paret
Oil on copper, 61,5 x 83,2 cm
1783
Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao. Adquirido gracias al patrocinio de BBK y la aportación de los Amigos del Museo en 2017

In 1786, Charles III entrusted Paret with the task of painting two panoramic views each year of harbours on the Bay of Biscay, probably with a view to completing the project commissioned in 1781 from Mariano Sánchez for a visual record of Spain’s most important ports. Paret had already painted several views of Vizcaya before 1786 and had sent some of them to the Prince of Asturias, the future Charles IV. This was perhaps the inspiration for the royal commission, which allowed Paret to recoup not only his salary, suspended with the death of the Infante Don Luis in 1785, but also his prestige at court.

Apart from 18th-century Italian vedute, the most immediate precedent of this type of landscape by Paret, animated with scenes of everyday life, was the series of The Ports of France painted by Claude-Joseph Vernet for Louis XV and disseminated through prints.

Gathered here are eight of the nine views by the artist currently known, and the only two drawings on the subject to have been preserved. This provides an exceptional opportunity for an overall view of a set of paintings of special beauty.

The chapel of San Juan del Ramo in the church of Santa María, Viana: paintings and drawings

The chapel of San Juan del Ramo in the church of Santa María, Viana: paintings and drawings
The Annunciation to Zacharias
Luis Paret
Oil on canvas, 266 x 224,5 cm
1786
Viana (Navarra), parroquia de Santa María

In 1785, shortly before the death of the Infante Don Luis and the repeal of his banishment, Paret received a commission to decorate the chapel of San Juan del Ramo in the church of Santa María de la Asunción in Viana, Navarre. The painter devised an iconographic scheme dedicated to scenes from the life of Saint John the Baptist, which were to be located in the entrance to the chapel and on its dome and pendentives. The laborious process of designing and executing the cycle is revealed by the preserved preparatory drawings. The painter combined the project with the views for Charles III and other commissions from the civic authorities of Bilbao, and so was unable to finish it until August 1787.

The figures on the dome show that Paret had studied not only the prints of Jean-Baptiste Le Prince and Giovanni Battista Tiepolo but also Michelangelo’s paintings for the Sistine Chapel. Specifically, the imposing postures and expressive gestures of Saint John evoke the celebrated figure of Christ in the Last Judgement, a citation that adds a universal quality to the scenes represented.

Last paintings commissioned at court in Madrid

In 1789, Paret went to Madrid to fulfil a royal commission to paint the oath of allegiance to Don Fernando, Prince of Asturias, as heir to the throne, a ceremony held in September that year at the church of San Jerónimo. He also started work on a commission for ten allegories of the domains of Spain for the Hall of the Five Major Guilds. These were also used to decorate the façade of the building during the festivities to commemorate the pledging of the oath to the prince and the proclamation the previous year of King Charles IV and Queen Maria Luisa of Parma.

The picture of the swearing of the oath to Don Fernando, finished in 1791, led to the appointment of Paret in 1792 as vice-secretary of the Academy of San Fernando and secretary of its Architecture Committee. At that time, Charles IV also accepted the artist’s proposal to change the 1786 commission for port views for another of scenes of the court, although the only picture that can be related to this series is the Botanical Garden from the Paseo del Prado. Paret did not succeed in obtaining any more important commissions, probably because of the strong artistic competition at court, prompting him to focus his attention until his death in 1799 on drawings and making illustrations for books and prints on a wide variety of subjects.

Paret’s creative process

Paret’s creative process
The Oath of Allegiance to Ferdinand VII as Prince of Asturias
Luis Paret
Oil on canvas, 237 x 159 cm
1791
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

The works and technical documents exhibited in this section illustrate Paret’s meticulous creative process. Before beginning The Oath of Allegiance to Don Fernando as Prince of Asturias, his prestigious commission for Charles IV, the artist presented the king with the composition in the form of a large and painstakingly executed drawing. On the priming of the canvas, he then made a new drawing with certain compositional changes visible in the infrared reflectogram. At the same time, he developed some details of the final painting in freer drawings. The video shows other examples of his production and working method.

Chronology

1746

Luis Paret y Alcázar is born on 11 February in Madrid. As a child, he studies humanities and Latin and learns drawing with Agustín Duflos, the king’s jeweller.

1757

He is admitted as a pupil to the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando.

1759

Beginning of the reign of Charles III, during which Anton Raphael Mengs is summoned to court by the king and introduces the Neoclassical style.

1763

The Infante Don Luis, the king’s younger brother, finances a three-year period of training in Rome for Paret. On his return, he paints innovative works for the royal family and private individuals.

1774

He is appointed court painter to the Infante Don Luis, for whom he will produce two sets of wash drawings of birds and other animals in his Cabinet of Natural History.

1775

He is banished to Puerto Rico for his supposed involvement in covering up the Infante’s amorous affairs. In Madrid, his wife subsequently takes steps to secure his return.

1778

Charles III allows him to return to Spain, but forbids him to come near the court. He therefore goes to live in Bilbao, where he is rejoined by his family.

1780

He is appointed as a full member of the Academy of San Fernando after submitting The Circumspection of Diogenes. He soon receives a wide range of public and private commissions.

1785

He is contracted to decorate the chapel of San Juan del Ramo in the church of Santa María in Viana, Navarre. The Infante Don Luis dies, whereupon the king rescinds his banishment, although he remains working in the north of Spain.

1786

The king commissions him to paint two views each year of ports on the Bay of Biscay. This allows him to retain the income he had received as painter to the Infante.

1788

In April, he presents some designs for fountains in Pamplona. He finishes the work for the chapel in Viana. Beginning of the reign of Charles IV.

1789

At the request of the new king, he travels to Madrid to paint the oath of allegiance to the Prince of Asturias, the future Ferdinand VII, a picture he completes two years later.

1792

He is appointed vice-secretary to the Academy of San Fernando, and so takes up residence definitively in Madrid. As he receives no more important commissions, he devotes himself at the end of his life to making drawings for prints.

1799

On 14 February, he dies of tuberculosis at the age of 53.

Artworks

1

Hannibal at the Temple of Hercules in Cadiz

Luis Paret

Black pencil and red pencil

1766

Madrid, Museo de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando

5

The Glory of Anacreon

Luis Paret

Black pencil, pen and carbon and brown ink

c. 1766-70

Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España

7

Party Preparing for a Masquerade

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

c. 1767-70

Madrid, Fondo Cultural Villar-Mir

9

Country Dande by the Door of a Tavern

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

c. 1770-75

Private Collection

11

The Letter

Luis Paret

Oil on panel

1772

Castres, Musée Goya – Musée d’art hispanique

12

Scene of a Dressing Room

Luis Paret

Pencil, pen and carbon ink wash

c. 1770-75

Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España

The Shop of Geniani
13

The Shop of Geniani

Luis Paret

Oil on panel

1772

Madrid, Museo Lázaro Galdiano

14

Puerta del Sol

Luis Paret

Oil on panel

1773

La Habana, Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes

20

Mountain Finch

Luis Paret

Black pencil, brush and wash of opaque pigments

1774-75

Madrid, Colección Juan Várez

21

Blue Tanager

Luis Paret

Black pencil, brush and wash of opaque pigments

1774-75

Madrid, Colección Juan Várez

23

María de las Nieves Micaela Fourdinier, the Painter’s Wife (?)

Luis Paret

Black pencil, pen, brush and washes of brown, carbon and coloured inks

c. 1780-85

Madrid, Museo Lázaro Galdiano

24

Slave Girl of Puerto Rico

Real Laboratorio de Mosaico y Piedras Duras del Buen Retiro (?)

Pietre dure

1778-1808

Madrid, private collection

25

Self-portrait as a Peasant of Puerto Rico

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

1776

Puerto Rico, Municipio de San Juan, Museo de San Juan

 

Self-portrait Attired in Blue
27

Self-portrait Attired in Blue

Luis Paret

Oil on paper affixed to canvas

c. 1780

Colección Abelló

29

The Daughters of Paret

Luis Paret

Oil on copper

1783

Private collection

30

Virgin and Child

Luis Paret

Oil on copper

c. 1783

Colección Abelló

33

Portrait of an Enlightened Gentleman

Attributed to Luis Paret y Alcázar

Oil on panel

c. 1789-94

Madrid, Museo de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando

34

Antonio Sancha

Luis Paret

Pencil, pen and wash of carbon ink with highlights of opaque white and blue pigments; frame drawn with light blue wash and gold ink

c. 1789-90

Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España

 

35

The Orange Seller

Luis Paret

Oil on copper

c. 1790

Colecciones Reales, Patrimonio Nacional, Palacio Real, Madrid

The Circumspection of Diogenes
36

The Circumspection of Diogenes

Luis Paret

Oil on panel

1780

Madrid, Museo de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando

37

The Apparition of Saint Michael to Charles VIII of France

Luis Paret

Oil on panel

c. 1780-83

Madrid, private collection

38

Mater Dolorosa

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

c. 1780

Madrid, private collection

39

The Invention of the True Cross

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

1781

Private collection

40

The Martyrdom of Saint Lucy

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

1784

Bilbao, Museo de Arte Sacro

41

The Virgin Nursing the Child with Saint Joseph or The Rest on the Flight to Egypt

Luis Paret

Black pencil, pen, brush and carbon ink wash

c. 1780-82

Madrid, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas

42

Holy Week Monument

Luis Paret

Black pencil, pen, brush and carbon ink wash

1780

Colección Saldaña Suanzes

43

Design of a High Altar for the Church of Santiago in Bilbao

Luis Paret

Black pencil, pen and brown ink, brush and wash of carbon and coloured inks

1786

BBK Fundación Bancaria

45

The Triumph of Love over War II

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

1784

Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao. Adquirido en 1999

46

Gallant Scene of High Society

Luis Paret

Oil on panel

c. 1780-87

Private collection

47

Gallant Scene of Low Life

Luis Paret

Oil on panel

c. 1780-87

Private collection

Saying the Rosary
49

Saying the Rosary

Luis Paret

Oil on copper

c. 1780-84

Colecciones Reales, Patrimonio Nacional, Palacio Real, Madrid

50

Blind Man and Guide Boy Eating Eggs or Costumes of Castile

Luis Paret

Oil on panel

c. 1784

Colecciones Reales, Patrimonio Nacional, Palacio Real, Madrid

View of Bermeo
52

View of Bermeo

Luis Paret

Oil on copper

1783

Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao. Adquirido gracias al patrocinio de BBK y la aportación de los Amigos del Museo en 2017

54

View of El Arenal in Bilbao

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

1783

Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao. Depósito de la Diputación Foral de Bizkaia a través de la dación de BBV en 1996

55

View of El Arenal in Bilbao

Luis Paret

Oil on panel

1784

London, The National Gallery

56

Disembarking on the Estuary

Luis Paret

Pencil, pen and brushed carbon, brown and blue ink washes

1785

Private collection

57

View of Portugalete

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

c. 1784-86

Madrid, Museo Cerralbo

58

Scene of Villagers (fragment of View of Fuenterrabía)

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

c. 1786-87

Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao. Donación de don Plácido Arango en 1996

59

View of Fuenterrabía (fragment)

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

c. 1786-87

Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao. Adquirido en 1986

60

The Port of Pasajes

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

1786

Colecciones Reales, Patrimonio Nacional, Palacio de La Zarzuela, Madrid

61

La Concha in San Sebastián

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

1786

Colecciones Reales, Patrimonio Nacional, Palacio de la Zarzuela, Madrid

62

The Estuary of Bilbao with the Towers of Luchana and the Desert of the Discalced Carmelite Fathers

Luis Paret

Pencil, pen and brushed carbon and brown ink washes

1785

Madrid, Colección Juan Várez

63

View of Fuenterrabía

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

c. 1786-87

Caen, Musée des Beaux-Arts

64

The Annunciation to Zacharias

Luis Paret

Black pencil, pen and carbon ink wash

1785

París, private collection

The Annunciation to Zacharias
65

The Annunciation to Zacharias

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

1786

Viana (Navarra), parroquia de Santa María

66

The Visitation

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

1787

Viana (Navarra), parroquia de Santa María

74

Allegory of Castile

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

1789

Madrid, private collection

75

Allegory of León

Luis Paret

Oil on canvas

1789

Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España

76

The Visitation

Luis Paret

Pencil, pen and carbon ink wash

1789-90

Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España

77

The Flight into Egypt

Luis Paret

Pencil, pen and carbon and brown ink washes

1789-90

Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España

78

The Oath of Allegiance to Ferdinand VII as Prince of Asturias

Luis Paret

Black pencil, pen and carbon ink wash with touches of white lead

1790

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques

79

Foot of the drawing with title, artist and allegorical figure

Luis Paret

Brush, pen and gold, carbon and iron gall inks

1790

Paris, Musée du Louvre, département des Arts graphiques

81

Infrared reflectogram of The Oath of Allegiance to Ferdinand VII as Prince of Asturias

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